chinaculture <![CDATA[Taste Buds | Heathy desserts exist]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/20/content_1480095.htm

It turns out that sweet and healthy desserts can be derived when Cantonese people look towards Traditional Chinese Medicine as a guide to eating.

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2020-05-20 16:49:03
<![CDATA[Video: This is Hubei]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/20/content_1480034.htm

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2020-05-20 10:31:59
<![CDATA[80 pictures show wonder of Shaanxi in South Korea]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/19/content_1479988.htm

The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

If someone wants to learn the history of China, Shaanxi is a must-visit place. As one of the cradles of Chinese civilization, it was the capital city of 14 dynasties in ancient China.

The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder through 80 photos and videos on May 19. 

The province is a favorite destination for South Korean people. In 2019, Shaanxi received 627,000 South Korean tourists, an increase of 12.02 percent year-on-year. Accordingly, many large enterprises of South Korea have opened branches in Shaanxi.


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition, featuring Shaanxi’s cultural heritage and natural wonder on May 19, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-19 14:59:20
<![CDATA[Online show on ancient Shu Kingdom launched in Sydney]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/19/content_1479989.htm

The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

To celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, the China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization.

The ancient Shu Kingdom is representative of the early civilizations of the upper reaches of the Yangtze River in China.

Bearing both mystery and history, the relics displayed at the online exhibition are the very manifestation of the ancient Shu civilization.


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney launched an online exhibition featuring the ancient Shu civilization to celebrate International Museum Day on May 18, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-19 15:20:39
<![CDATA[Seeking 'A Stitch in Time' at post-COVID art show]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479941.htm

Palestinian artist Bashir Makhoul's installation, Fata Morgana, is on show at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]

After remaining off-limits to the general public for months, the nation's public venues, including art spaces, have finally opened their doors to people seeking cultural enrichment, diversion and recreation in a post-pandemic era.

The past weekend saw visitors stream into the Today Art Museum in Beijing, eager to view its 4th triennial Today's Documents, which opened on Dec 13 but had been put on hold due to the viral outbreak.

Today's Documents, launched in 2007, has evolved to be a major exhibition of international contemporary art, committed to showcasing and promoting the experimental and academic value of contemporary Chinese art, as well as reflecting the latest advances of art in Asia and beyond, said Gao Peng, producer of the art show and the museum's former director.


A visitor views Palestinian artist Bashir Makhoul's installation, Fragile Line at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]

The 2019 triennial, co-curated by Chinese art critic Huang Du and British art historian Jonathan Harris, is themed A Stitch in Time, a saying meaning "it is better to deal with problems early than to wait until they get worse".

Artwork by 37 artists and art groups from 16 countries were brought together to expose the complex social, political, economical and cultural changes fracturing the world and threatening the future of mankind. The show aims to inspire visitors to join hands to "stitch up the fissures" in the world, according to the curators.

The exhibition runs through June 25.

If you go:

10:00-18:00, Tuesday to Sunday. Building 4, Pingod Community, No 32 Baiziwan Road, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-58760600北京市朝阳区百子湾路32号苹果社?号楼今日美术?/em>


Chinese artist Jiang Zhi's video installation, Poetry, is on show at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Project 1336: Life in the Lane, an installation by Nepalese artist Manish Lal Shrestha, is on display at the Today Art Museum in Beijing, on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


A visitor pauses to view Chinese artist Shen Yuan's installation, Homework, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors look at Chinese artist Shang Yang's installation, Remaining Water, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Translocation No. 18, an installation by Chinese artist Xiao Yu, is on view at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese artist Liu Xiaodong's oil painting, Steel 1, is on display at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


South Korean artist Cody Choi's Episteme Sabotage series is on show at The 4th Today's Documents ?A Stitch in Time, at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese artist Zhang Kechun's photograph, People Doing Morning Exercise Under a Dragon Lamp, is on show at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]


Chinese artist Zhang Kechun's photograph, People Fishing by the River, is on show at the Today Art Museum in Beijing on May 16, 2020. [Photo by Yang Xiaoyu/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-05-18 17:00:09
<![CDATA[Exhibition showcases beauty of Wudang Mountains]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479940.htm

The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

China's scenery is renowned for many reasons. One major attraction are the great mountains that lay across the country's land mass.

The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day.

Located near the city of Danjiangkou in central Hubei province, the Wudang Mountains are home to a famous complex of ancient palaces, temples and Taoist buildings dating back to the 7th century.


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The area represents the highest standards of Chinese art and architecture over a period of nearly 1,000 years.

The exhibition displays about 100 photos capturing the beauty of the mountains in four seasons and its cultural heritage, including ancient architecture, Taoist culture and martial arts.


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Tourism Office in Seoul launched an online exhibition on China's Wudang Mountains on May 18 to celebrate International Museum Day. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-18 16:50:58
<![CDATA[Cultural relics exhibited at Nanjing Museum]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479929.htm

A journalist takes photos of the exhibits during a special exhibition with a selection of cultural relics dating from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) to the Qin and Han Dynasty (221 BC-220 AD) at the Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, May 17, 2020. The special exhibition will kick off on May 18.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on May 17, 2020 shows the bronze chariot and horse of Han Dynasty during a special exhibition with a selection of cultural relics dating from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) to the Qin and Han Dynasty (221 BC-220 AD) at the Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, May 17, 2020. The special exhibition will kick off on May 18.[Photo/Xinhua]


A journalist takes photos of the exhibits during a special exhibition with a selection of cultural relics dating from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) to the Qin and Han Dynasty (221 BC-220 AD) at the Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, May 17, 2020. The special exhibition kicks off on May 18.[Photo/Xinhua]


A journalist watches the exhibits during a special exhibition with a selection of cultural relics dating from the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC) to the Qin and Han Dynasty (221 BC-220 AD) at the Nanjing Museum in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, May 17, 2020. The special exhibition kicks off on May 18.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-05-18 16:27:45
<![CDATA[New museum celebrating history of Chinese in Australia planned for Sydney]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479928.htm A new museum dedicated to the history of Chinese people in Australia will open soon in the heart of Sydney, exploring and preserving the two countries' centuries-old shared past.

Plans for the Museum of Chinese in Australia (MOCA) were highlighted by City of Sydney officials on Monday, coinciding with International Museum Day.

"The museum will play an important role in promoting and sharing the story of Chinese settlers and their descendants, as well as understanding and celebrating their challenges, contributions and achievements," Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore said.

It will occupy a Victorian-era three-story sandstone building on the edge of the city's Chinatown in Haymarket, recently vacated by the suburb's library.

"Haymarket is the home of our city's oldest and largest Chinatown, so it's fitting that this is where we will create a centre for the preservation of our Chinese history," Moore said.

MOCA will feature rotating exhibitions, a collection of historic reference materials including books and journals, community spaces for meetings and events and a studio area for artistic programs.

There will also be an attached cafe and shop featuring Chinese-Australian inspired baked goods.

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2020-05-18 15:39:42
<![CDATA[Online photos show Silk Road in Seoul]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479916.htm

The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On May 15, the China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road, part of the Visiting China Online series of virtual shows.

About 40 photos taken by more than 10 photographers are on display at the exhibition, showing a series of provinces in China along the Silk Road. The enduring look of these places shows the long-lasting vitality of the Silk Road.

Once bridging the ancient world through commercial and cultural exchanges, the Silk Road echoes the spirit of China's Belt and Road Initiative that aims to improve connectivity and cooperation on a transcontinental scale.

Click here http://suo.im/6lWhrF to learn more about the exhibition.


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition on the Silk Road on May 15, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-18 14:49:11
<![CDATA[Three Beijing hotels offer free stay for front line medics]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479879.htm

Hotels affiliated to China World Trade Center in Beijing will offer free stay for medic workers who have worked on the front line fighting COVID-19. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Three hotels affiliated to China World Trade Center in Beijing will offer free stay for nearly 3,000 medical workers who once worked on the front line fighting COVID-19.

Starting from May 15, doctors and nurses who stayed in this virus-battling campaign, either in Beijing-based hospitals or as part of the medical teams from Beijing supporting Hubei province, have been or will be invited to have VIP experiences in China World Hotel, Shangri-La China World Summit Wing, and Hotel Jen Beijing, as well as China World Mall, the shopping mall.

Tang Wei, general manager of China World Trade Center Co Ltd, said the bonus project was to express gratitude toward medical workers who made sure people's safety and would like them to relax and take a good rest in the resorts.

Zhao Yu from Xiaotangshan Hospital was one of the earliest medical workers checking in Shangri-La China World Summit Wing in this program. She once stayed away from home for over 40 days and remained glued to her working position.

"Though the virus has been largely contained in China, it's not the end," she said. "People still need to follow rules to protect themselves well. I wish COVID-19 could pass sooner, and people can thus freely enjoy their time staying with their families."

Hotels affiliated to China World Trade Center in Beijing will offer free stay for medic workers who have worked on the front line fighting COVID-19. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-05-18 13:29:10
<![CDATA[Ceramist works on replica of Bakohan in Longquan, Zhejiang province]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479869.htm

Liu Jie works on the replica of Bakohan at his studio in Longquan, East China's Zhejiang province, May 7, 2020. Liu Jie, 35 and a renowned ceramist in Longquan, began to replicate Bakohan since 2019. He has so far made over 500 replicas in an effort to approach perfection. "I wish to replicate its beauty." said Liu. Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on May 17, 2020 shows Liu Jie's replica of Bakohan. Liu Jie, 35 and a renowned ceramist in Longquan, began to replicate Bakohan since 2019. He has so far made over 500 replicas in an effort to approach perfection. "I wish to replicate its beauty." said Liu. Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]


Liu Jie works on the replica of Bakohan at his studio in Longquan, East China's Zhejiang Province, May 7, 2020. Liu Jie, 35 and a renowned ceramist in Longquan, began to replicate Bakohan since 2019. He has so far made over 500 replicas in an effort to approach perfection. "I wish to replicate its beauty." said Liu. Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on May 17, 2020 shows Liu Jie's replica of Bakohan. Liu Jie, 35 and a renowned ceramist in Longquan, began to replicate Bakohan since 2019. He has so far made over 500 replicas in an effort to approach perfection. "I wish to replicate its beauty." said Liu. Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on May 17, 2020 shows Liu Jie's replica of Bakohan. Liu Jie, 35 and a renowned ceramist in Longquan, began to replicate Bakohan since 2019. He has so far made over 500 replicas in an effort to approach perfection. "I wish to replicate its beauty." said Liu. Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]


Bakohan is a tea bowl made in Longquan, China, and gifted to Japan during the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279). During the era of Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Bakouhan was found to have cracks and was then sent to China to be fixed. The bowl is now displayed in the Tokyo National Museum.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-05-18 11:07:13
<![CDATA[Cultural revenue stream]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479843.htm

Scenes from Love Forever, a Chinese musical adapted from The Legend of the White Snake, in which Fahai, a Buddhist monk, tries to capture the snake's spirit; Xu Xian, a kind young man, marries Bai Suzhen, the White Snake spirit, which is played by Sun Yuan, a singer with the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In a bid to beat the effects of the pandemic, two Chinese theater institutions have teamed up with streaming platform Youku to premiere their first online musical, Chen Nan reports.

Months after being forced to shut its doors to the public to curb the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater and China Performing Arts Agency Theaters launched a Chinese musical, titled Love Forever, which will premiere on Youku, China's major streaming platform, on Tuesday.

Based on the famous Chinese fairytale, The Legend of the White Snake, which is the love story between a male human and a female snake spirit, the musical is directed by Mao Weiwei from the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater, written by composer Li Xiaobing, who is also a professor of the Central Conservatory of Music, and Chen Xiaoqi, a renowned music producer.

The Legend of the White Snake has been adapted into plays, Peking opera productions, television shows and films. The story is well-known among Chinese audiences.


Scenes from Love Forever, a Chinese musical adapted from The Legend of the White Snake, in which Fahai, a Buddhist monk, tries to capture the snake's spirit; Xu Xian, a kind young man, marries Bai Suzhen, the White Snake spirit, which is played by Sun Yuan, a singer with the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"For the first time, we premiere a theatrical production online rather than in a theater, which is very exciting and fresh for all of us," says Tian Yan, head of the opera troupe of the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater, adding that the idea of the musical started three years ago and it has been postponed due to the viral outbreak. "We had no idea if the audiences would accept the new way of premiering a show online or not, but once the news of the musical's premiere was released, they reacted warmly."

According to One World Culture Communication Co Ltd, a company under CPAA Theaters, the musical will cost 6 yuan ($0.85) for viewers who have a Youku membership and 12 yuan for non-members.

"When they reopen, we will take the musical back to the theaters, with shows touring around the country," says Yu Tingting, deputy general manager of One World Culture Communication, adding that the online premiere wouldn't affect the ticket revenues of theaters. "For theatergoers, watching a show inside a theater is an experience which cannot be replaced by watching shows online. When the outbreak ends, everything will be up and running again and will soon get better."


Scenes from Love Forever, a Chinese musical adapted from The Legend of the White Snake, in which Fahai, a Buddhist monk, tries to capture the snake's spirit; Xu Xian, a kind young man, marries Bai Suzhen, the White Snake spirit, which is played by Sun Yuan, a singer with the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Singer Zheng Qiyuan, who has gained a large fan base with his appearances in popular reality show Super Vocal Season II and performance at the CCTV Spring Festival Gala on Jan 24, will play the leading role of Xu Xian, a humble and kind young man. He falls in love with, and gets married to, the White Snake, which transforms into a woman. However, the marriage is opposed by Fahai, a Buddhist monk in Jinshan Temple, who maintains that coexistence of the human and the evil spirit is not allowed. He then imprisons the snake spirit under Leifeng Pagoda on the bank of the West Lake and the couple have to overcome many obstacles to be together.

"Performing in front of empty seats is challenging, yet fulfilling. I missed the feeling of performing on-stage when I had to stop performing due to the pandemic. It's a creative solution for theaters to get through this difficult time," says Zheng, 40, who graduated from Shenyang Conservatory of Music and joined the China National Opera and Dance Drama Theater in 2002.

Singer Sun Yuan will play the role of the White Snake (Bai Suzhen), while her fellow vocalist, Chen Mengzi, will play the role of her companion, the Green Snake, another snake spirit who transforms into a woman.

Tian notes that the dancers and singers of the theater had to get used to training and keeping in shape at home when the outbreak began. They shared their training sessions with fans online in a bid to help satisfy the audiences' thirst for cultural content during the lockdown.

"Of course, it's a very difficult time for us. We really rely on performances to keep in touch with our audience," Tian says. "The first attempt at staging online performances might help and offer us a different way of sharing our work. As for the audiences, they will be recharged with art."

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2020-05-18 08:15:39
<![CDATA[Restorers of Xumishan Grottoes prove to be picture of dedication]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479844.htm

Relic restoration experts repair murals in the No 48 cave of Yuanguang Temple at the Xumishan Grottoes in Ningxia on April 27. It's the first repair and recovery project carried out at the 1,500-year-old grottoes since the Qing Dynasty.[Photo/Xinhua]

Even during the scorching summer, the team of seven had to wear layers of thick clothes and knee pads to stay warm in a freezing and damp grotto. The dark space is dimly illuminated by their headlights and is home to wall paintings dating back hundreds of years.

They are not adventurers, but seven restorers who are helping to bring back the luster of the artwork found in more than 160 grottoes that dot the red cliffs of Xumishan in Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region.

The Xumishan Grottoes, first built in the late period of the Northern Wei Dynasty (386-534), house 162 caves and more than 1,000 statues, along a main stretch of the ancient Silk Road.

The murals, which total 185 square meters, are now in dire need of repair due to destructive human behavior and natural factors such as erosion that have occurred over the course of a millennium.

"I got goosebumps when the whole pattern of the painting showed up clearly after we had spent some 20 days cleaning it," says 60-year-old Wang Minquan, an expert in the group who has been participating in the year-long repair program-the largest of its kind since the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)-since April.

The work can be tedious and demanding, Wang says, adding that young people these days do not have the patience to climb up and down the scaffolds, fix cracks and clean flaky walls all day.

On some steep rocky slopes, the team has to scramble a few dozen meters to reach a higher stone statue, with ropes tied around their waist like a climber.

Years of work in the freezing and dark grottoes has resulted in cervical spondylosis and cold legs for Wang and his colleagues.


Relic restoration experts repair murals in the No 48 cave of Yuanguang Temple at the Xumishan Grottoes in Ningxia on April 27. It's the first repair and recovery project carried out at the 1,500-year-old grottoes since the Qing Dynasty.[Photo/Xinhua]

To take the chill off their bodies, they usually take a break every two hours to bathe in the sunshine and sip a cup of hot tea. "Over an hour of work in the cave can chill one to the bone," 69-year-old Wang Xiaosheng says.

Wang Xirong, 40, son of Wang Xiaosheng, is the youngest member of the team. He started his career in his 20s, around the same age that his father followed in the steps of his grandfather.

"It was not easy for me to stick to the job at the very beginning, as we often spend months or years away from our families, and sometimes it is like living in the wilderness," says the 40-year-old.

Together with his father, Wang has traveled half of the country to repair mural paintings, including in the relic-rich Shanxi and Shaanxi provinces, as well as Sichuan province after the 2018 earthquake.

"The past decades have polished my edges, as I have been truly impressed by the craftsmanship and patience of the ancient artisans who left the treasures for us," he says.

"Those who make it a lifelong career are those who have a passion for cultural relics and history," says Wang's father.

Decades of life in grottoes make it hard for the seven experts to keep up with the pace of modern life, but they always keep themselves updated with the latest knowledge and techniques of their craft.

"It's my dream to repair works at the Mogao Grottoes in Dunhuang (Gansu province) which is heaven for craftsmen like me," Wang says.

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2020-05-18 08:15:06
<![CDATA[Ballerinas unite to help lessen impact of outbreak on fellow dancers]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479845.htm

Misty Copeland  performs The Dying Swan, from a video to support the global community of dancers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Thirty-two dancers from 14 countries came together to give a performance for a virtual audience, in a bid to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on members of the ballet community.

They performed the iconic piece, The Dying Swan, set to the music of Le Cygne (The Swan) written by Camille Saint-Saens and performed by cellist Wade Davis.

The video, titled Swans For Relief, saw ballerinas in their pointed shoes dancing indoors and outdoors, against the varying backgrounds of living rooms, dining rooms, kitchens and garden lawns.

"Today, my fellow ballerinas and I launch Swans For Relief, a fund to support the many dancers in our global community that are no longer able to work due to the coronavirus," said American Ballet Theater principal dancer Misty Copeland, on her Twitter account on May 6. She came up with the initiative with her former colleague, Joseph Phillips.

Copeland was also the first ballerina featured in the video, who, in her tutu and toe shoes, performed the dance near her TV and couch.

"I made a point to name it by its original name, Le Cygne, The Swan. The significance of this iconic variation is in the choreography. The purpose of the dance is not to display technique but to create the symbol of the everlasting struggle in this life and all that is mortal," she said on her Twitter account.

Born in Kansas City, Missouri and raised in San Pedro, California, Copeland began her ballet studies at 13. She joined the American Ballet Theater as a member of the corps de ballet in 2001, and in 2007, she became the company's second African-American female soloist and the first in two decades, according to Copeland's official website. In June 2015, she was promoted to principal dancer, making her the first African-American woman to ever achieve the position in the company's 75-year history.


Chinese dancer Xu Yan performs The Dying Swan, from a video to support the global community of dancers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

The dancer wanted to have a diverse group for the video, so the 32 ballerinas represent 22 companies from all around the world, including China, Russia, Europe, Cuba, Mexico, the Philippines, South Africa, Canada and the United States.

One of the ballerinas featured in the video is Xu Yan, a 25-year-old Chinese dancer with the National Ballet of China, who performed the piece at the company's rehearsal rooms in Beijing.

"About two weeks ago, I was invited to join in the project through a friend. Since the performance venues are closed due to the outbreak, the performing arts market is suffering. It's a great idea to interact with ballet fans and raise funds for ballet dancers, who are facing challenges now," says Xu, who joined the National Ballet of China in 2011 after she graduated from the dance school affiliated to the Shanghai Theater Academy the same year.

The dancer plays leading roles in the productions of the National Ballet of China, such as Dunhuang, inspired by the Mogao Grottoes in Northwest China's Gansu province, and Russian choreographer George Balanchine's classic three-act ballet, Jewels.

According to Xu, though Copeland has never performed with the National Ballet of China, she is well-known among Chinese dancers since she is a star ballerina.

The National Ballet of China and the American Ballet Theater have held cultural exchange events, which enabled the two companies to build a friendship. In 2015, dancers of the two companies performed Swan Lake at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing.

"Art brings people together. This project certainly proves how powerful art is when we are experiencing shared emotions resulting from the spread of COVID-19," Xu says.

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2020-05-18 08:14:33
<![CDATA[High-class service back on menu for guests to reopened Ritz-Carlton]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/16/content_1479842.htm

The Ritz-Carlton, Tianjin reopens on April 24. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The Ritz-Carlton, Tianjin has seen a steady rise in room bookings and guests to its luxury restaurants and open-kitchen restaurant, Zest, since reopening on April 24.

"Though the May Day holiday period was not what it has been in the past, we did reach an occupancy above 50 percent with respectable rates," said Radek Cais, general manager of The Ritz-Carlton Tianjin Hotel and The Ritz-Carlton Executive Residences. "The performance was not supported by discounted products," he added.

"At The Ritz-Carlton, we prefer not to work with discounts," he said. "We pledge to provide the finest personal service and facilities for our guests who will always enjoy a warm, relaxed yet refined ambience."

To show the hotel's appreciation for dedicated medical professionals around the globe who are fighting the novel coronavirus, "we have carefully prepared a special complimentary lunch for two at Zest, available to all of the superheroes who choose to stay overnight at our hotel," Cais said.

Located in the heart of Tianjin, the hotel has architecture that reflects the city's long history and robust modern development. It has become a landmark hotel in Tianjin.

With the COVID-19 outbreak well under control in China, the hotel is giving priority to its commitment to working harder under the company's motto "we are ladies and gentlemen serving ladies and gentlemen". It is part of the Ritz-Carlton Gold Standards, which were created in 1983, the general manager said.

"Service is our profession and we are proud of our profession. It stresses hospitality is a people-oriented business?from deep in the hearts of our ladies and gentlemen. We care about our guests and we care about each other," he noted.


Radek Cais, general manager of The Ritz-Carlton Tianjin Hotel and The Ritz-Carlton Executive Residences [Photo provided to China Daily]

For example, the hotel's executive Chinese chef Goh Wooi-cheat and Tianjin cuisine chef Zhang Weijin collaborated to create a modern, luxurious interpretation of traditional baozi steamed stuffed buns during the closure of the hotel in late January.

They tried many times and finally created recipes that provide guests with an unforgettable dining experience. By combining high-end ingredients, such as Australian scallops, and Black Angus beef with foie gras, the culinary artists at the hotel have crafted comfort food and the "gourmet signature buns" of the hotel.

"We want to bring our services and products to the next level," the general manager emphasized.

During its closure, the hotel has spent a lot of time on training its staff members to work in the "ladies and gentlemen" spirit and provide a safe environment for guests.

"In addition, we have expended tons of effort to create a new dining experience," Cais said.

At Zest, each culinary station is a cooking showcase of visual experiences as chefs prepare fresh dishes. Several signature dishes are presented to guests at the table, creating a storytelling and refined-dining experience.

"We have open kitchens so that the guests can see how the dishes have been prepared," Cais said. "Instead of guests going to get their own food, such as with a traditional buffet, our chef will bring the dishes to the guest and tell the story of each dish so that the guest understands the authenticity behind each one."

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2020-05-16 10:50:00
<![CDATA[Major hotels now open for business after virus brought under control]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/16/content_1479841.htm International hospitality groups are gradually resuming trade in China as the country has entered a phase of regular epidemic prevention and control.

As of May 8, all of Hilton's 250 hotels in the Chinese mainland had resumed business, said Qian Jin, area president for Hilton Greater China and Mongolia. He added that there were 150 Hilton hotels temporarily closed to new bookings during the COVID-19 outbreak.

"Reopening all our hotels in the Chinese mainland is the first step in a measured global recovery process," said Chris Nassetta, president and CEO of Hilton. "We are confident that there are brighter days ahead."

Many of Hilton resorts were fully booked during the May Day holiday earlier this month. They also reported an improvement in their daily occupancy rate, Qian told Beijing Business Today newspaper.

More than 98 percent of the 470-plus hotels owned by InterContinental Hotels Group in China have been operating since May 5. This is despite nearly one-third of them being temporarily closed due to the epidemic, said Jolyon Bulley, CEO of IHG Greater China. Other hotels in the pipeline have also resumed construction work, Bulley added.

"China is IHG's second-largest market and the fastest growing one. We're confident of the long-term outlook of China's hospitality industry," he said. According to Bulley, the development of urbanization, growing disposable income of residents, and the improvement of tourism infrastructure and other factors will promote the continuous growth of China's hotel market demand.

Catering services offered by hotels, including Hyatt Regency Beijing, Wangjing; Shangri-La Hotel, Beijing; and China World Summit Wing, have also begun to resume, Beijing Business Today reported. Out of health, safety and operation cost concerns, buffet dinner services are suspended, according to the newspaper.

Zhao Huanyan, chief knowledge officer at Huamei Consulting, told the newspaper that on the global hotel industry landscape, China is expected to be among the first rallying markets, because of the country's effective control of COVID-19.

However, foreign travelers have long been a key targeted client group for most international franchised business hotels in the country. Such operations have been affected by overseas developments of the pandemic, Zhao said. As a result, the entire hospitality industry still has a long way to go before a full recovery so cost control still remains a crucial issue for hoteliers, he added.

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2020-05-16 10:10:00
<![CDATA[Culinary marvels]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/16/content_1479839.htm

[Photo provided to China Daily]

An author, lawyer and wine critic, Ch'ng Poh Tiong writes about cuisine from a cultural and historical point of view. In his 100 Top Chinese Restaurants of the World 2020, just published as its second edition, the restaurants aren't ranked. However, there are accolades for Restaurant of the Year, Dish of the Year (for Dong Shunxiang at Wei Zhuang Hangzhou and his braised sliced pork pyramid), Chinese Cuisine Ambassador of the Year (for Alfred Leung Chi-wai, the founder of Imperial Treasure Restaurant Group), and separate lists for the Top 10, Top 20 and Top 30.

What's fascinating about this book is that it explores Chinese restaurants around the world-and not just the ones you'd expect in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Among the cities represented are New York, London, Paris, Mumbai, Yokohama, Bangkok, Ipoh, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Foshan, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Yangzhou, Suzhou ?the list goes on.

Beyond the restaurants themselves, the reader will discover numerous things they may not know: that xiao long bao didn't originate in Shanghai but was already very popular in Kaifeng during the Northern Song dynasty; that the best char siew may actually be in Malaysia; and that there's a teahouse in Yangzhou that makes up to 50,000 bao a day. Time to plan a road trip.

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2020-05-16 09:45:00
<![CDATA[Overseas Museum re-opens with postcard exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479878.htm

[Photo by Wang Kaihao/China Daily]

The Overseas Chinese Museum of China reopened on May 15 after a closure lasting over three months due to COVID-19, starting things off with a major exhibition of old postcards.

The 200-odd exhibited postcards, old photos and other articles mostly dating back to the early 20th century, and the exhibition combines them all to show the history of Chinatown in San Francisco.

[Photo by Wang Kaihao/China Daily]

Curators of the exhibition aim to lead through the early history of Chinese immigrants to the city and reflect their contribution to local communities. Particular focus is also brought to their devotion to rebuild the city after it was hit by a devastating earthquake in 1906, as well as bravery during World War II.

Many scenarios from daily life were portrayed in postcards, which serve as important references for historical studies.

[Photo by Wang Kaihao/China Daily]

About 100 pieces were collected by Herby Lam, a Chinese-American who permanently donated 17 of them to the museum.

The exhibition is set to run through July 19.

[Photo by Wang Kaihao/China Daily]

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2020-05-18 13:11:55
<![CDATA[Museums rise to COVID-19 challenge]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479846.htm

A guide at the Memorial Museum of Lao She joins an online host in a livestreaming program in Beijing on Saturday. [Photo/Xinhua]

Museums in many Chinese cities are holding a variety of events to promote culture and get closer to the public, echoing the theme of the 2020 International Museum Day, which is "Museums for Equality: Diversity and Inclusion".

As part of the activities held during International Museum Day, which falls on Monday, more than 20 of China's most renowned museums are providing access on digital platforms to virtual exhibitions from Sunday to Tuesday.

Starting at 9 am on Monday, six major attractions, including the Maiji Mountain Grottoes and Mogao Caves, will be shown on a livestreaming platform for the first time.

Nanjing, capital of Jiangsu province, will host the main event of this year's event in China. Scholars from foreign countries and organizations, including the United Kingdom, the United States and the International Council of Museums, will also join an internet symposium in Nanjing on the future development of the world's museums in the context of cultural diversity.

Wu Xiaolin, deputy director of the Jiangsu Provincial Department of Culture and Tourism, said the province has 302 registered museums that provide diversified and professional exhibitions. The museums in the province received more than 100 million visitors last year.

On Monday, the Nanjing Museum is holding an exhibition showcasing about 200 cultural relics ranging from the Spring and Autumn period (770-476 BC) to the Han Dynasty (206 BC to AD 220).

Many curators of museums, including the Dunhuang Academy, the Nanjing Museum and the Hebei Museum, will also give detailed information about their top collections on livestreaming channels.

As China's cultural center, Beijing is building itself as a "city of museums" with its 187 registered museums.

On International Museum Day, the city's museums will launch 94 events, including 50 online exhibitions and 15 livestreaming broadcasts, to reduce the infection risks from face-to-face contact.

"The online exhibitions and livestreaming can overcome the limits of time and space to provide content equally for all," said Chen Mingjie, head of the Beijing Administration of Cultural Heritage.

"We have organized experts to give high-quality museum interpretations to all online and offline audiences."

He said that cultural heritage authorities in Beijing want to create an atmosphere in which local residents and visitors can access a museum anytime and from any location.

The events will allow people to closely observe cultural relics without being physically present at the museums.

Museums have also adopted popular tools and high-tech to enrich internet-based event experiences.

A group of museums such as the China National Film Museum, the Memorial Museum of Lao She and the Overseas Chinese History Museum of China hold livestreaming broadcasts, while some others such as the China Media Museum will adopt virtual reality technology to provide a more vivid experience.

"Even though we are in the special period of COVID-19 epidemic prevention, we can still connect closely with our audience with the help of VR technology," said Pan Li, head of the China Media Museum.

Owned by the Communication University of China, the China Media Museum focuses on the development of the country's media industry.

"Items in our exhibition are not something ancient. Most of them are just decades old, but they can evoke the memories and emotions of the visitors because these are related to people's lives in some way, which I believe is the most important meaning of museums," he said.

"Going to museums has become fashionable nowadays as the public has a growing appetite for culture."

To enhance communication with the audience, the Capital Museum will launch "Me and Museum" educational projects, soliciting works such as videos, audio recordings, paintings and photography from the public, and the winning entries will be exhibited at the Capital Museum.

Navigation service provider AutoNavi will also provide descriptions of about 600 items that belong to 20 national museums.

Citizens can open the updated AutoNavi app and listen to the descriptions wherever they are.

Guo Ning, vice-president of the company, said the app can play the role of a "smart carrier" to bring culture to a wider audience.

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2020-05-18 09:15:14
<![CDATA[China's Best Museum Exhibitions of 2019]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479852.htm

China's Best Museum Exhibitions of 2019 Awards are unveiled today. Twenty-nine winners distinguish themselves in five categories. The annual event, dubbed the Oscar Awards in China's cultural relics realm, has now completed its 17th run since its inception in 1997, receiving 114 applications from various types of museums.

The winning exhibitions cover a wide range of themes, including art, science, history, natural history, and modern revolutionary history, and offer various perspectives on and interpretations of artistic, historical, or scientific collections. Notably, two categories of awards are dedicated to international joint exhibitions to promote cross-cultural understandings between China and the rest of the world. [BGM from AGM]

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2020-05-18 10:14:42
<![CDATA[Ancient Shu civilization reveals unsolved mysteries]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/18/content_1479848.htm Exploration of museums in ancient Shu ---- unsolved mysteries of thousand-year-old relics

The ancient Shu civilization, originating in Sichuan and environs through the early Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC), is an ancient civilization distinct from the Central Plains civilization but still related to it.

Before the excavation of the Sanxingdui and Jinsha sites, there were no reliable written materials recording the ancient Shu civilization, shrouding this society in mystery. With the excavation of many cultural relics, that mystery has only deepened.

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2020-05-18 09:44:35
<![CDATA[How can a hot soup cool you off?]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/15/content_1479804.htm

How does Traditional Chinese Medicine inform the way Cantonese people eat? Let’s look at their love for soup first.

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2020-05-15 10:07:49
<![CDATA[China's world heritage highlighted in online show in New Zealand]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/14/content_1479763.htm

The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The 14-day online display of world heritage in China, launched by the China Cultural Center in Wellington, saw its end on May 11.

As a part of the Visiting China Online series of virtual shows, the event introduced a variety of world natural and cultural heritage sites in China, attracting many New Zealanders and local Chinese.

A screenshot of the Facebook page of the China Cultural Center in Wellington. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A Facebook user Simon Meikle expressed his fondness of those wonders in China and expected the center could have more similar events to show the beauty of China.

The local Chinese were also amazed by the shows. Some said it is a pity that they haven't visited these heritage sites in the mainland, and they would add them to their future travel plans.

Guo Zongguang, director of the center, said more online events will be launched later on.


A screenshot of the Facebook page of the China Cultural Center in Wellington. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Wellington launched a 14-day online display of world heritage in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-14 13:52:29
<![CDATA[Online exhibition showcases splendid Hubei in South Korea]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/13/content_1479704.htm

The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

After living in the shadow of the COVID-19 epidemic for months, Central China's Hubei province is finally enjoying spring with vigorous and fresh looks.

Under such circumstances, the China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage, trying to help local people to appreciate the beauty of Hubei in a most convenient way.

As one of the important cradles of Chinese culture, Hubei has developed its unique culture and customs.


The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Part of the Visiting China Online series of virtual shows, the exhibition features Hubei in about 60 pictures, from which viewers can see its landscapes, natural resources and cultural heritage.

Dai Shishuang, director of the office, said the event also aims to let more local people know travel in China now is safely guaranteed under strict hygienic measures, preparing for their future visits to China.


The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Tourism Office in Seoul recently launched an online exhibition on Hubei's natural wonders and cultural heritage. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-13 15:55:23
<![CDATA[Hairdresser steps up to make the most out of life]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/02/content_1479240.htm

Fan Guozhi runs at a park in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. [Photo provided to China Daily]

A 46-year-old hairdresser is enjoying the thrill of living different identities in his day-to-day life by being a marathon runner, fitness fanatic and volunteer.

"Just live a happy and bold life. This has always been my motto," said Fan Guozhi who gets fun from workouts besides his ordinary role as a hairdresser.

Fan recently shared his attitude toward life via WeChat Moments on April 21, after finishing a 111.11-kilometer race.

But it wasn't always this way. Fan, who has been working in the hairdressing industry for almost three decades in Hangzhou, capital of East China's Zhejiang province, knew nothing about fitness or workouts six years ago.

"As a hairdresser, I used to work very late at night and usually had midnight meals after work," he recalled. "In 2014, my weight was only 55 kilograms, but I had a pot belly.

"At that time, I felt tired from time to time, but couldn't find any diseases when I went to the hospital."


Fan and his friend pose after running 111.11 km on April 21.[Photo provided to China Daily]

His poor state of health made him decide to make some changes and he started to go to the gym.

"Today, no one can imagine that I had no interest in any exercise in the first 40 years of my life," Fan said. "But I always believe that people should do something we don't like to strengthen our wills."

Driven by a thirst for change and purpose, Fan kept exercising through self-study. Now, he has reached the weight of 61 kilograms and a body fat ratio of less than 10 percent. In October 2018, Fan joined a running event by accident which led to him keeping fit by running.

In the past one and a half years, he has grown into an excellent runner in the eyes of his peers.

"I once participated in an ultra-marathon event, which took me 12 hours to finish the whole race, and also joined some 100-km trail-running competitions," Fan said.


Fan displays his build after a morning exercise. [Photo provided to China Daily]

He added that not long ago, he and his friends ran from Hangzhou to Huzhou, a Zhejiang city 80 km away, in less than seven hours, which usually takes more than two hours by car.

On April 21, Fan and two others decided to run around a 550-meter track in a sports park. They started at around 3 am, when the sky was still dark, and spent 10 and a half hours completing 200 laps, which amounted to 111.11 km.

"We prepared enough food and water to stay energized and this was also the first time that I wore a pair of sandals for such a long distance," said Fan.

Despite the feat, he returned to work at his salon the next morning after a night of rest.

In addition to his roles of hairdresser and runner, he has also done his part to serve society.

Fan has kept a tradition in his salon that people older than 65 are welcome to have free haircuts every Monday morning.

"Some elderly people will wait before the doors open, so we usually open the business earlier on Mondays," he said. "I don't know the exact number of people that we've served, but I will keep offering the service as long as the salon is open."

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2020-05-02 09:52:56
<![CDATA[App helps ring in a better life]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/06/content_1479261.htm

Young entrepreneurs of the Yi ethnic group (from left) Mise Achang, Leku Wuniure and another colleague work in the office of their startup, Yayou app, which offers a series of Yi-language services.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A modern phone can put the world at the user's fingertips. Calls, messaging, photos and information access, all make for an enhanced lifestyle. But sometimes, these phones are of little practical use. Leku Wuniure's 63-year-old mother communicates in the Yi language. She can't read Chinese or speak Mandarin and is unable to read numbers. Consequently, a simple, taken-for-granted feature of any modern phone, say finding a contact, can prove to be difficult. Whenever she wants to call her son, she has to ask someone to help her to dial his number.

Leku, 25, a young man of the Yi ethnic group, naturally, wanted to help. So he created an app that responds to his mother's request to "call my son" in the Yi language. Once this is said, the app will automatically dial his number. The app is called Yayou. It turned out to be a fantastic aid for his mother and has also benefited many among the more than 8 million Yi people in China.

"With the app, I wanted to help my mom, as well as the Yi people," says Leku, a college student at Southwest Petroleum University in Chengdu, the capital of Southwest China's Sichuan province. "Besides my mother's plight, I've also witnessed some villagers, who left to make a living as migrant workers in cities, suffering financial losses or misunderstanding due to the obstacles in communication."

The dream is becoming bigger-after more than two years' development, Leku and his partner Mise Achang are ready to launch an updated version of their app in May. The 2.0 version of Yayou will have several new functions, providing news and entertainment content, as well as online shopping services, in both the Yi and Chinese languages. What's more exciting, some users will be able to test the new voice assistant function and interact with their smartphone in the Yi language, before its final release.


A store run by the company under construction in Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture, Sichuan province.[Photo provided to China Daily]

The two entrepreneurs hope that, like the name of the app-Yayou meaning "potato" in the Yi language, a common, indispensable ingredient for the Yi people living in the Daliangshan area, Sichuan province-the app could be a helpful tool in people's lives.

Four years ago, Leku enrolled in Southwest Petroleum University in Chengdu, majoring in surveying and mapping engineering. Leaving Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture where he has lived for more than two decades, Leku missed cultural richness and the singing and dancing of his people in his hometown.

Leku's childhood friend, Mise, 24, who graduated last year from a vocational school in Chongqing, has felt the same pangs of loneliness when he stayed in the metropolis to study hospitality administration.

The duo decided to develop the app initially to gather audio and video materials of Yi songs. They took a year to create the app and released the first version in December 2018.

More than 6,000 people registered on Yayou in the first three months, which encouraged the duo to further develop their app to serve more people.

While Leku studied in Chengdu and began the startup there over two years ago, his mother could only wait for his call once a week to chat with him for a short time. Leku felt an urgency to develop a voice assistant function to help his mother, and other people in his hometown.

With the app, users could listen to more Yi-language songs, and read news presented on the app. They can watch videos in the Yi language about how to fight against the novel coronavirus.


 

The app provides news feeds for users, and is also a platform where users can enjoy listening to songs in the Yi language.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Thinking big

 

The app, apart from bringing greater convenience, can also serve as an important cultural tool. It can be used as a database to collect oral and written records of Yi culture and help preserve it.

"We will ask Yi singers to record songs," Mise says.

"Moreover, for the elderly people who still remember our traditional songs, we will help them have the old songs recorded or filmed.

"For example, there are some beautiful songs that I heard shepherds singing when I was a kid. I hope such songs will be recorded and passed down to future generations."

Currently, their automatic speech recognition for the Yi language only has 60 to 70 percent accuracy. Technicians have to update the program when sentences can't be recognized by the system. The team now has 12 technicians.

"My plan is to develop this Yi language voice assistant in two or three years, and we will only launch it when it's ready. We don't want to provide any half-done products," Leku says.

Their work and goals were ably assisted by the Yi people. Singers and directors promised to support the app by posting their audio and video materials for free. Some Yi students also volunteered to help test the voice assistant function and offer their version of Yi oral materials.

Professors of the Yi language from Southwest Minzu University and Minzu University of China also helped them check on the translation into Mandarin. "New words keep coming, especially recently concerning COVID-19," Leku says.

The app now boasts more than 400,000 registered users. "Most of them are Yi people, but some are people who want to know more about Yi culture," Leku says.

Money is always an issue for any entrepreneur. So far they have accumulated debts of more than 200,000 yuan ($28,230) each in order to keep their team running.


The app provides news feeds for users, and is also a platform where users can enjoy listening to songs in the Yi language.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"Our resources are limited. If we can have some investment, the development of the app, especially the voice assistant function, can be sped up," Leku says.

Each month brings a paycheck day, and that can be stressful. He has to take some part-time photography work to get extra income, and sometimes, he has to borrow money from friends, to pay the team's wages.

Luckily the Yayou app has won him several college venture capital contests with some prize money that can help him ease the financial stress.

He says he won't give up even if there is no investment, and he believes that what he's been doing has benefited many.

Besides the voice assistant function, Leku also added an online shopping function on the app, through which he hopes to help his hometown sell its products to a wider market. "Our wooden lacquerware is well-crafted, and our buckwheat is also quite good," Leku says.

He also started to open brick-and-mortar stores in his village and plans to open one in each large village in Daliangshan.

"It has been an impoverished area for a long time and the country has helped us a lot. I feel that I have a responsibility to contribute to the process as well, by doing something for my hometown," he says.

 

 


The app provides news feeds for users, and is also a platform where users can enjoy listening to songs in the Yi language. CHINA DAILY

 

 

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2020-05-06 09:00:07
<![CDATA[Culinary guide reveals best Chinese cuisine around the planet]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/09/content_1479411.htm

The 100 Top Chinese Restaurants of the World guide publishes its second edition, giving the reader a chance to explore Chinese cuisine all over the planet.

 

An author, lawyer and wine critic, Ch'ng Poh Tiong writes about cuisine from a cultural and historical point of view. In his 100 Top Chinese Restaurants of the World 2020, just published as its second edition, the restaurants aren't ranked. However, there are accolades for Restaurant of the Year, Dish of the Year (for Dong Shunxiang at Wei Zhuang Hangzhou and his braised sliced pork pyramid), Chinese Cuisine Ambassador of the Year (for Alfred Leung Chi-wai, the founder of Imperial Treasure Restaurant Group), and separate lists for the Top 10, Top 20 and Top 30.

What's fascinating about this book is that it explores Chinese restaurants around the world –and not just the ones you'd expect in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Among the cities represented are New York, London, Paris, Mumbai, Yokohama, Bangkok, Ipoh, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore, Foshan, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Yangzhou, Suzhou?the list goes on.

Beyond the restaurants themselves, the reader will discover numerous things they may not know: that xiao long bao didn't originate in Shanghai but was already very popular in Kaifeng during the Northern Song dynasty; that the best char siew may actually be in Malaysia; and that there's a teahouse in Yangzhou that makes up to 50,000 bao a day. Time to plan a road trip?/p>

Print versions of100 Top Chinese Restaurants of the World 2020(in English and Traditional Chinese) are available at 13 major bookshops across Hong Kong, while e-versions (English, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese) are available at 100chineserestaurants.com.

Made in China, Beijing

[Photo provided to China Daily]


Dong Shun Xiang's pyramid of braised sliced pork

[Photo provided to China Daily]


Steamed egg white stuffed with crabmeat

[Photo provided to China Daily]


Imperial Treasure, Paris

[Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-05-09 09:06:00
<![CDATA[China's tourism market sees strong recovery: official]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/09/content_1479406.htm

Visitors take photos inside the Palace Museum in Beijing, on May 6, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

China's tourism market saw a strong recovery during the five-day May Day holiday, an official said Friday.

With regular epidemic control measures in place, the tourism market basically recovered to 50-percent of the level in same period last year, Wang Xiaofeng, an official with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, said at a press conference.

China received a total of 115 million domestic tourists during the holiday, generating a revenue of 47.56 billion yuan (about $6.72 billion), he said.

During the holiday, scenic spots across the country were asked to control the number of visitors to no more than 30 percent of their maximum capacity, while launching an online reservation system to receive visitors at staggered time periods and timely dispersing crowds at key areas, Wang said.

The official added that the ministry also urged the strict implementation of control measures including checking temperature and health QR codes, as well as keeping social distancing.

With measures carried out in a prompt and proper manner, scenic areas maintained safe and orderly operation in the five-day holiday, Wang said.

No epidemic outbreaks occured at tourist attractions during the holiday, and no major safety accidents related to holiday travel or major complaints were reported, he said.

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2020-05-09 08:40:00
<![CDATA[Self-driving trips popular in holiday as Chinese embrace outdoors]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/08/content_1479354.htm Self-driving trips have become an increasingly popular choice for Chinese during the past May Day holiday as they embraced the open air after a relaxation of travel restrictions amid the waning COVID-19 epidemic, a report showed.

The index measuring the enthusiasm toward self-driving trips on the first day of the five-day holiday has doubled the level recorded on the first day of the Qingming Festival holiday in early April, according to a report jointly compiled by Kuaishou, a popular short-video sharing platform, and Chinese mapping service provider AutoNavi, or Gaode Map.

This indicates a recovery to 60 percent of the level in the same period last year, according to the report.

The report said visitors were more enthusiastic about traveling by car as they believe it would be safer to visit wide-open outdoor sites due to the COVID-19 epidemic.

During the holiday that ended Tuesday, Chinese tourism authorities required indoor tourist sites to remain closed while setting a 30-percent cap on the daily visitor capacity for outdoor sites that have resumed operations.

Inter-city traveling has also been popular for car trips, the report said, citing city clusters in regions such as the Yangtze River Delta, the Pan-Pearl River Delta and the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area.

A surge in short videos posted online also indicated a rebound in overall tourism. On May 1, the number of sightseeing-themed short videos posted on Kuaishou jumped 45 percent compared with the first day of the Qingming Festival holiday.

An earlier survey jointly carried out by the China Tourism Academy and Trip.com Group, a leading Chinese online travel agency, showed 41 percent of the respondents would choose to travel by car once the COVID-19 epidemic came to an end, while more than 90 percent of them would choose domestic tours.

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2020-05-08 09:15:00
<![CDATA[Remake of Leslie Cheung's 1987 classic film an online hit]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/08/content_1479352.htm

A still image of The Enchanting Phantom features the protagonist Ning Caichen, starring actor Chen Xingxu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The fantasy film The Enchanting Phantom, a remake of late Hong Kong megastar Leslie Cheung's 1987 classic A Chinese Ghost Story, has become a runaway hit on streaming sites during the just-concluded Labor Day holiday.

Authorized to use the 1987 film's theme song, sung by Cheung, the new film has stirred up a storm of nostalgia, earning around 18 million yuan ($2.5 million) at the online box office -- revenue shared between streaming sites and producers -- in merely four days since its release on the streaming giant Tencent Video on May 1.

Exemplifying its popularity, the film has been ranked in the most-searched topics list on the Twitter-like Sina Weibo six times, seeing its soundtrack broadcast over 100 million times online and accumulating 460 million clicks on related topics on Sina Weibo.


Actress Li Kaixin stars Nie Xiaoqian, the ghost protagonist in The Enchanting Phantom. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Costing a total of around 40 million yuan, the film -- which was shot in a soundstage covering 8,000 square meters in Zhejiang province and featured 1,423 special-effect shots -- has raised the bar of online films, which have surged in recent years thanks to the fast development of the internet industry in China.

Liu Chaohui, the film's producer and CEO of Jinhua Wudao Nanlai Culture Media Co Ltd, released a public letter yesterday to express his gratitude to those dedicated to online films, a sector that had been looked down upon for a long time.

Online films, or movies tailored for streaming platforms, usually involve a much lower budget and a cast receiving less pay than films targeting cinemas.


Hong Kong veteran Norman Chui plays a cruel demon in The Enchanting Phantom. [Photo provided to China Daily]

As some such films portray clichéd stories with lousy visual effects, or even borrow ideas from hit movies, some domestic industry insiders have developed a bias, unfairly believing online films mostly want to make money fast instead of creating quality works, says Liu.

"But I believe the online film industry is new, interesting and full of vitality. In some sense, it's like a game for daredevils, as it is very challenging and unprecedented. Besides, producers are facing a completely C2C, or customer-to-customer, market, making it more difficult and financially risky than the traditional business," explains Liu.

A veteran who has worked in the film and television industry for more than two decades, Liu recalls he shifted to the emerging market of online content since late 2015.

He says he believes online films have big potential in the future, wishing the industry will attract more talent and produce more popular titles to change the industry bias.


Poster of The Enchanting Phantom. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-05-08 09:00:33
<![CDATA[Nonprofit so wing a literal seed for children]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/07/content_1479318.htm

Zhang Mingzhou, president of the International Board on Books for Young People.[Photo provided to China Daiy]

With schools closed, no playing with friends allowed and parents working at home amid the COVID-19 pandemic, many youngsters around the world have a lot of questions about what's going on.

To help them better understand and cope with the situation, as well as learn about the people on the front line fighting against the virus, a website called Life Tree Books (www.lifetreebooks.org.cn) was launched on April 2-International Children's Book Day-offering free access to quality children's books.

Eleven children's books have so far been translated into more than 10 languages and are available on the website. They can help to explain COVID-19 and the long and complicated relationship between humans and viruses, and offer practical advice about how to prevent the disease from spreading.

Within its first week, the website was visited about 20,000 times by visitors from 53 countries and regions.

"We hope that the platform can answer children's questions about the disease and help them become lifetime readers and learners," says Zhang Mingzhou, the project's initiator and president of the International Board on Books for Young People.

Established in 1953 in Switzerland, IBBY is a nonprofit organization committed to bringing books and children together. With its secretariat in Basel, it is known for inaugurating the Hans Christian Andersen Awards, the world's highest recognition for children's literature creators, IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award and IBBY-iRead Outstanding Reading Promoter Awards. IBBY is also known as the organizer of the International Children's Book Day and the International children's literature journal, Bookbird. Elected in September 2018, Zhang is the first Chinese person to chair the organization.

A recent UN report shows that as of mid-April, more than 1.5 billion youngsters have been affected by the school closures that have been enacted in around 188 countries.

"Facing the unprecedented challenge, we must take action to protect our children. We are family, and they are our future," Zhang says.

"Our global project can help children worldwide get through the coronavirus and enhance international communication and understanding," Zhang says.

When explaining the website's name, he says the website has been created because of the pandemic, but "like a seed, it will grow into a giant tree when the coronavirus is over". As for the website's poster and logo, he feels very grateful to the designer, Brazilian illustrator Roger Mello, laureate of the 2014 Hans Christian Andersen Award, for his excellent work, his passion and generosity.

Zhang says that, as time goes on, more children's books on COVID-19 are being sent to him for multiple language translation.

Iranian writer Ali-Asghar Seyyedabadi's Hannah, Our Hero is one example, teaching children how to take care of themselves during the pandemic.

Elena Perikleous, writer and president of IBBY Cyprus, has translated her latest children's book into English and emailed it to Zhang, hoping the book can be translated into multiple languages to reach more children.

"As the pandemic spreads across the world, an increasing number of publishers and writers are creating books full of color and life to help children understand and get through the pandemic," Zhang says.


The poster and logo for the Life Tree Books' website designed by Brazilian illustrator Roger Mello.[Photo provided to China Daiy]

Joint efforts

As the first country to report the disease, Chinese publishers have swung into action, creating many coronavirus-themed children's books, which is impressive, Zhang says.

Inspired by these books, Zhang initiated the program on Feb 29, calling for Chinese publishers to donate their international copyrights of the published COVID-19 children's books and calling for translators to help translate the books for free.

Within a week, Zhang received copyright donations for around 60 books from more than 50 publishers, writers and illustrators. More than 400 translators applied, with about 200 from Shanghai International Studies University.

"I have been deeply touched by their devotion in the past month. We have 'fought' shoulder-by-shoulder in our way to combat the virus," Zhang says, adding that it is "a miracle" for the website to be launched with just a month's preparation.

For the translation work, Wu Gang, deputy dean of the Graduate Institute of Interpretation and Translation of Shanghai International Studies University, is the head of the program's translation team.

"All the students and teachers from the Graduate Institute of Interpretation have taken part in the project. Using their translation skills, they have made their own contribution in the global fight against the virus," Wu says.

Zhang Yanran, head of the Spanish translation group and a student at the Institute, says she has always believed that children's books have a magic power to give readers the courage to conquer difficulties.

Ma Ainong, well-known for her translation of the Harry Potter series, translated Virus, Virus, You Cannot Scare Me!, which is a pop-up book, enabling parents and children to learn about how viruses spread and what people can do to protect themselves effectively.

She tells Beijing Daily that books always provide children the best company, especially during difficult times, such as the pandemic.

"These books, in diverse ways, help children gain knowledge and power in the face of the crisis," Liu Lei, a senior publisher and leader of the program's design team, tells China Press Publication Radio Film and Television Journal.

The project will be promoted in IBBY's 81 national sections, Zhang says, adding that there will also be promotion activities at major book fairs, including Bologna Children's Book Fair, Frankfurt Book Fair and Beijing International Book Fair.

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2020-05-07 11:24:01
<![CDATA[The wind of change]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/13/content_1479580.htm

Asheng from Liaoning province, like Lin, is among a group of musicians who contributed to the growing popularity of the ancient instrument.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Traditional Chinese musical instrument, the suona, is enjoying a popular revival thanks to the power of social media, Chen Nan reports.

On Oct 21, a student of the Middle School Affiliated to Xi'an Conservatory of Music, Shaanxi province, shared a video on the internet, in which he performed the iconic piece, Summer, composed by Japanese musician Joe Hisaishi. The piece, which was featured in Japanese director Takeshi Kitano's 1999 movie, Kikujiro, was adapted by the Chinese student for suona, a Chinese traditional wind instrument with a double-reed mouthpiece.

The video became popular online and it inspired another player, Lin Shenli, a Shenzhen-based electrical engineer, to pick up the suona again, an instrument he had learned as a child, but which he had not played for some time.

"In the video, there were other students playing musical instruments, such as piano and the zhongruan (a plucked long-necked lute-like stringed instrument), but the sound of the suona is the most piercing and memorable," says Lin, 29. "After watching the video, I took out my suona and tried to perform the same piece with my own interpretation."

On Nov 4, Lin posted his first video playing the suona on social media platforms, such as video-sharing platform Bilibili and microblogging platform Sina Weibo. His rendition of Hisaishi's Summer received over 1 million views.

"I didn't expect the video to be so popular among the viewers. I did it just for fun," says Lin, who has made several more videos of himself playing his suona since then.

He has performed a variety of musical works, such as the hit song, Ordinary Road, written and performed by Chinese singer-songwriter Pu Shu, and the nostalgic soundtrack of 1992 TV drama, The Legend of White Snake.

Fans applauded at his suona technique and were surprised by the versatility of the musical instrument, commonly seen as one with a bright, full sound and high pitches that can produce mirthful or heartbreaking melodies at both weddings and funerals in rural northeastern China. Although now a traditional instrument, it was introduced into China from Persia or the Arab world in the third century.

Throughout the novel coronavirus pandemic, Lin has been uploading videos every week, hoping to offer entertainment for people who had to stay at home and might be bored. The pieces he selected were usually tracks found on the music charts released by major music streaming platforms, such as QQ Music and NetEase Cloud Music.

"The process of adapting those music works is easy for me because the suona has a wide tonal range," says Lin, who records his content at home after work.

Many viewers left comments for Lin saying that his videos are hilarious. "What makes me happier is that some viewers have gained a different perspective about the age-old musical instrument," Lin says.


Lin Shenli, a Shenzhen-based electrical engineer, plays the suona onstage.[Photo provided to China Daily]

One of the most impressive comments he received is: "The stereotype is wrong. The suona is so commonly seen that its sounds have been ignored. In fact, it's a beautiful musical instrument rather than something simply making a high-pitched sound."

Born and raised in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, Lin graduated with his master's degree in electronic engineering from Zhejiang University in 2017 and has been working in Shenzhen as an electrical engineer since.

Music has always been a part of his life, although Lin never considered taking it as a career.

He learned to play bamboo flute 10 years ago and he also plays the suona and sheng (a traditional Chinese wind instrument).

"It was hard to play the right tones when I learned these traditional instruments, but I played them for fun, so the learning process was full of joy because I was under no pressure," Lin says.

Traditional Chinese musical instruments, such as the suona, have gained a new fan base among the younger generation thanks in part to social media platforms, such as Chinese short video-sharing platform Douyin.

From April 10 to 13, Douyin launched an electronic music festival titled DouLand, during which several young Chinese suona players displayed their musical talent by illustrating what the musical instrument can do.

One of them, named Chuanzi, in his early 30s, adapted a remastered vocal version of Norwegian music producer Alan Walker's hit, The Spectre. To Chuanzi's surprise, Walker left him the message "brilliant, love this" after watching his suona version of the song.

Another suona player who goes by the stage name, Asheng, has been covering hit songs with the instrument since 2016. In one of his videos, clad in a hoodie and cap, Asheng played American singer-songwriter Billie Eilish's Bad Guy with a saxophone and a suona, which was watched over 800,000 times.

In another performance, the 27-year-old from Shenyang, Liaoning province, adapted Lemon, the chart-topping song by Japanese music star Kenshi Yonezu, on the suona, which garnered over 2 million views.

Asheng, who studied in Taiwan, graduating with a major in traditional Chinese music in 2018, learned to play suona when he was in high school.

He admits that people's prejudice against traditional Chinese musical instruments has limited the development of the suona.

"Few people want to learn it, because they consider it 'unfashionable'. Many people don't know the capability of the musical instrument," says Asheng.

He mentions Song of the Phoenix, the final film released in 2016 of the late director Wu Tianming (1939-2014), which depicts a young suona apprentice who wants to form his own musical troupe at a time when the presence of traditional instruments is in decline in contemporary Chinese society.

"The suona is good at depicting joyful, noisy, and grand scenes," Asheng says. "Song of the Phoenix is also the name of the best-known classic piece featuring the suona, which uses the instrument to imitate the sounds of various birds, depicting dynamic nature and a joyous mood. It shows the instrument's versatility."

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2020-05-13 07:59:56
<![CDATA[Theaters adapt to dramatic change of scene]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/13/content_1479579.htm

Gao Xiaopan, left, founder of the Hip-hop Crosstalk Club, performs xiangsheng in Beijing before the pandemic. [Photo/China Daily]

Audiences warm to online shows as venues remain closed

Imagine owning a small theater in downtown Beijing staging xiangsheng, or crosstalk, shows-the most popular comedy performance genre in China. The venue attracts audiences of about 200 every night during the week, and more on the weekends.

More than 100 performers are on the books, and you are making a profit thanks to loyal audiences and xiangsheng fans, who see the theater as a place for fun, relaxation and a chance to meet friends.

Then the novel coronavirus pandemic arrives. Suddenly, your business-and many others like it-has to close to help contain the virus. Even if it could stay open, people self-quarantining at home and practicing social distancing are not going to the theater.

This situation confronted Gao Xiaopan, the owner of a small theater in Beijing and founder of the Hiphop Crosstalk Club in the capital. The xiangsheng performer, who has been practicing the art since he was 8, eventually decided to close the theater.

On April 19, Gao bid farewell to the venue, which he founded at the end of 2013. He shared a photo on his Sina Weibo account, which has more than 2 million followers, of himself sitting on the stage.

The theater is situated in Jiaodaokou-a populous hutong, or alleyway, area near the Gulou, or Drum Tower and Nanluoguxiang, both popular tourist attractions.

"I was depressed when all the shows were canceled due to the viral outbreak. However, I didn't expect the situation to worsen," Gao, 35, said.

He added that the last show his troupe staged was at the Minzu Theater in Beijing on Jan 18, which attracted an audience of more than 1,000. Performances were planned for after Lunar New Year's Eve, which fell on Jan 24.

Gao said he has asked himself several crucial questions in recent weeks, such as what will happen to his business and colleagues? Will they be able to pay their rent? Will the theater business survive the impact of the virus?


The Drum Tower West Theatre in Beijing remains closed during the outbreak. [Photo by Wang Zhuangfei/China Daily]

Born in Baoding, Hebei province, Gao enjoyed watching comedy movies as a child, and one of his favorite film stars is Hong Kong-born Stephen Chow.

His mother took him to a local arts training center, where Gao studied xiangsheng as a form of entertainment. However, she did not expect him to choose it as a career, as the prospects did not appear promising at the time.

Xiangsheng was first staged in Beijing in 1862, when performers began attracting audiences in the Tianqiao area of the capital, a place where street players gathered to perform a variety of shows, such as acrobatics, Peking Opera and pingshu, a traditional Chinese form of storytelling.

Performances of xiangsheng usually feature two performers clad in traditional long robes, standing behind a wooden table and engaging in witty banter, although there are solo productions and those involving three players or more.

Familiar issues, including troubled family relationships and social topics, usually form the main theme of the humorous conversations, the aim being not only to entertain but also to educate. A xiangsheng performer's reservoir of talent runs deep and includes allusions, innuendo, puns, songs, tongue-twisters and liberal doses of fantasy.

Classmates gave up

Young players study with a xiangsheng master for three to five years and perform with the teacher to gain experience in mastering onstage techniques and communicating with an audience. They then strike out on their own. The art form's basic skills include shuo (talking), xue (imitation), dou (teasing) and chang (singing).

"I enjoy making people laugh, and I learned fast," said Gao, who started studying xiangsheng at the National Academy of Chinese Theatre Arts in 2003.

After graduating, 80 percent of his classmates gave up performing xiangsheng, but Gao persevered. To make a living, he did part-time work as a shopping guide, wedding host and house painter.

In 2004, he started to perform xiangsheng regularly at the Chaoyang Cultural Center in Beijing, where he gained a large fan base. With his original pieces, Gao combines the traditional wit with jokes inspired by daily life. His onstage improvisation appeals to young audiences.

In 2008, he founded the Hip-hop Crosstalk Club, along with a dozen young xiangsheng performers, including You Xianchao, Gao's longtime partner. Gao found fame and more fans through appearances in television shows, movies and reality productions.


The Hiphop Crosstalk Club in the Jiaodaokou area of the capital is also closed. [Photo by Wang Zhuangfei/China Daily]

He formed the idea of staging shows at his own theater after his troupe began performing regularly every week. In 2013, he secured a bank loan to launch his first theater in Jiaodaokou, which started to make a profit a year later. In 2017, Gao opened his second venue, a 300-seat theater in Wukesong, western Beijing.

"Although I have other work, such as acting in movies and appearing in reality shows, I really love performing xiangsheng at the two theaters and this has never changed," he said.

During the coronavirus pandemic, many of those working in the performing arts industry have turned to staging shows online, the Hip-hop Crosstalk Club being no exception.

On March 28, Gao and xiangsheng performers from the club held their first online show on Douyin, one of the country's most popular short-video platforms. The debut performance was watched by more than 1.2 million people, way beyond Gao's expectations.

"It was all new to me, as I had rarely watched shows streamed online before I started to do it myself," he said. "But when I realized that this was a way to connect with audiences, I decided to do it every day."

Along with his colleagues, Gao writes scripts for each day's online show. However, unlike theater, where audience reaction provides immediate feedback to his jokes, he adjusts the tempo for online shows and the way of telling stories. He also answers questions from audiences, bringing him closer to fans.

"It's not just me and my company facing a crisis as a result of the virus. Some of my friends, who run film and advertising companies, face the same dilemma-pay the rent or eat first?" Gao said. "The sudden changes to the business made me think about my company's future. If we can survive this, I'll be all the better for it."

He added that staging xiangsheng shows online can never match theater shows, a sentiment with which Yang Lin, a performer from Tianjin, agrees.

"Xiangsheng performances rely on facial expressions and body language to communicate with audiences. It is hard to keep the attention of an audience watching in front of a screen," said Yang, who heads a five-year-old xiangsheng troupe in Tianjin, and faces a similar situation to Gao.


The exterior of the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing. [Photo/China Daily]

Beijing and Tianjin are the two most important centers for xiangsheng. The capital is the hometown of renowned exponents such as Hou Baolin (1917-93), while masters like Ma Sanli (1914-2003) were born in Tianjin. Because of the cities' proximity, performers frequently compare and exchange styles and techniques, and have a common audience base.

Yang's troupe faces no pressure from rental payments, as he leads it in performances at teahouses in Tianjin.

"Obviously, we may gain a fan base with online performances, but I think that theaters are still the main venues to keep xiangsheng alive," he said.

Meanwhile, Li Yangduo, who owns the Drum Tower West Theatre, tucked away in hutongs near the Gulou area of Beijing and which stages contemporary plays, was planning to celebrate its sixth anniversary last month, but had to cancel the arrangements due to the outbreak.

On April 17, Li posted an open letter on the venue's social media platform, stating that it was facing a severe financial struggle, as all shows had been canceled and it had no income.

She then decided to save the theater by selling cherries online, an idea inspired by her friend Li Ge, a theatre producer from a small village in Yantai, Shandong province, which is known for growing and selling the fruit.

With the outbreak affecting the fruit trade, Li Ge uses social media platforms to sell cherries for her family.

Li Yangduo said: "Like many small theater owners, I'm pretty devastated by what's happening. We are all facing extremely difficult circumstances due to COVID-19. We literally don't have a penny of revenue coming through the door.

"The news about selling cherries caught my attention and I was drawn to the idea immediately. I am a big fan of (Russian playwright Anton) Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard. When I saw the pictures of real cherry trees posted by Li Ge, I was touched." She added that she named a bookstore at the Drum Tower West Theatre the Cherry Orchard Bookstore.

"There's never been a situation like this. It's unclear when we will be able to stage shows again, but we will do whatever we can to keep the theater alive," Li Yangduo said.

The theatre's supporters warmed to the idea, and within three days, more than 1,500 kilograms of cherries were sold.


A Peking Opera singer livestreams at the Shanghai Grand Theatre. [Photo/China News Service]

"It was beyond my hopes. We had never sold fruit before. We knew that people wanted to show their support for us and to return to watch plays at the theater, just as we do," Li Yangduo said. "For all of us, the theater is a land full of imagination and joy."

Recruitment plan

The Drum Tower West Theatre has produced 12 plays in the past six years, including The Pillowman, adapted from award-winning Irish playwright and director Martin McDonagh's eponymous story, and Thunderstorm, written by renowned Chinese playwright Cao Yu.

Last year, nearly 300 performances were staged at the theater, attracting total audiences of about 60,000. Plays produced by the venue also toured nationwide, with more than 60 performances drawing some 60,000 people.

To keep in touch with audiences, Li Yangduo has also launched online programs, including those in which theatergoers share their favorite scripts and read them together. She also plans to recruit actors for her theater, in the hope of preparing new works for when it reopens.

"We think we're doing something unprecedented. What we do now is for the future of the theater. The viral outbreak will end, and we just don't want to abandon our dream," Li Yangduo said.

The government has drawn up plans for small theaters and independent cultural companies to weather the pandemic, such as providing subsidies and allowances to performing arts venues as well as increasing loans to cultural enterprises.

Large venues, such as the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing and the Shanghai Grand Theatre, are also connecting with audiences during the outbreak.

According to a report on April 29 by the Beijing Association of Performing Arts, the average operating cost of larger venues in China is about 25 million yuan ($3.53 million) a year. They depend on financial sources such as government support, ticket sales and donations.

On May 2, 100 days after it closed, the Shanghai Grand Theatre launched an online performance featuring the Jin Xing Dance Theatre, China's leading contemporary dance company, the Shanghai Ballet and the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra.

Media platform The Paper quoted Zhang Xiaoding, general manager of the Shanghai Grand Theatre, as saying, "It's heartening to see the warm audience feedback at a time when the performing arts industry remains under enormous pressure as it struggles with the uncertainty of the coronavirus.

"There's still no clear idea of how long the closures will last, but the tradition of going to the theater will never die."

On May 8, the State Council announced that entertainment venues such as cinemas and theaters will be opened gradually, and online appointments will be needed for admission.

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2020-05-13 06:49:50
<![CDATA[Drama rekindles interest in Chinese Renaissance]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479499.htm

The poster for the costume drama Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a number of calligraphy pieces and paintings of the Song Dynasty in the background. [Photo/douban.com]

Serenade of Peaceful Joy (Qing Ping Yue), a historical TV drama about the life of an emperor of the Song Dynasty (960-1279), has become an unexpected hit among viewers of the Chinese mainland.

Unlike the Qing Dynasty (1664-1901), which is more familiar due to its proximity to modern times and has often been used as a backdrop for beloved historical dramas, the Song Dynasty (960-1279), often dubbed the Chinese Renaissance, has somehow become lesser known by today's Chinese viewers, especially younger generations.

But the show, released on April 7, has racked up more than 3.26 billion views online as of Monday, reported Maoyan, a major Chinese TV and film database.

The costume drama -- which stars the popular and seasoned actor Wang Kai, and perfectly blends romance and politics -- has drawn much attention from viewers for its depiction of refined Song culture, local media say.

Chronicling the four-decade reign of the fourth Song Emperor Renzong (1022-1063), the drama offers a glimpse into the arts, culture and social life of his time in a compelling portrayal that has sparked millions of posts and comments on social media.

Now let's take a close look at Serenade of Peaceful Joy and savor the brilliance of the culture and arts that radiate throughout the drama.


A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a lotus-shaped wine-warming bowl, a wine ewer, plates and candle holders, which are all celadon. [Photo/douban.com]

Song ceramics

Many viewers have marveled at the beautiful and elegant porcelain featured in the show. The Song Dynasty saw a great leap in both ceramic art and technology. History holds that there were more than 1,000 kilns around the country. Craftsmen competed with one another to advance kiln technologies as well as search far and wide for fine and new types of clay as well as exotic glaze colors.

A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joyfeatures a celadon incense burner and several celadon utensils. [Photo/douban.com]

Among all the kilns, five –Ru ware, Jun ware, Guan ware, Ding ware, and Ge ware ?stood out for producing the best porcelain for royals to use. Influenced by the aesthetic prevailing among scholar-officials who valued minimalism and nature, Song ceramics are known for their straightforward shapes, muted coloration, glazes in subtle hues, and nature-inspired decorative motifs.

Distinct for its rare light bluish-green glaze, fine craftsmanship and jade-like gloss, Ru ware celadon is heavily featured in the drama along with a smattering of the black-glazed porcelain from the Ding ware.

A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a number of celadon pieces on the table. [Photo/douban.com]


Actors playing famous Song poets –Yan Shu (right) and Fan Zhongyan (left) -- are seen along with the famous lines of their works, which are still familiar to modern people. [Photo/Official Weibo Account of Qing Ping Yue]

Song Ci

The lyric poetry Ci, which enjoys the same renown as another artistic expression form Shi, originated in the late Tang Dynasty (618-907), but flowered and reached its zenith in the Song Dynasty.

Each piece of Ci is based on one of some 800 Ci Pai, originally titles of tunes, which specify the particular fixed pattern of tone, rhythm, number of characters per line and number of lines. Hence, it is common to come across several Ci penned by different poets about different topics sharing the same title.

Qing Ping Yue, the drama's title in Chinese, is a common Ci Pai used in Song poetry. Accomplished Song poets who were also important officials -- such as Yan Shu, Fan Zhongyan and Ouyang Xiu -- were featured in the drama, with several scenes dedicated to portraying them reading their own pieces.


A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a screen painted with a landscape painting of the Song Dynasty in the background. [Photo/douban.com]

Song painting

When it comes to masterpieces in ancient Chinese painting, no connoisseurs would avoid mentioning Along the River During the Qingming Festival (Qingming Shanghe Tu) or A Panorama of Rivers and Mountains (Qian Li Jiang Shan Tu).

Both were created during the Song Dynasty, an era in which, as many scholars believe, Chinese painting reached its pinnacle, with Huizong (1082-1135), the eighth Song emperor, an accomplished painter himself and also a patron of the arts.

A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joy shows a Song Dynasty flower-and-bird painting hung on the wall for decoration. [Photo/douban.com]

With the prevalent aesthetic in that period emphasizing being true to the physical world, landscape and portrait paintings all come across as highly descriptive and even realistic.

In the drama, landscape paintings and portraits of auspicious animals are placed on walls or used as screens, giving an artistic and animated air to the palace's décor.

A poster for the costume drama Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a part of a landscape painting of the Song Dynasty. [Photo/douban.com]


A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features the Fei Bai Shu written by Emperor Renzong of the Song Dynasty. [Photo/douban.com]

Song calligraphy

Along with poetry, calligraphy in Chinese culture is an important means for personal and creative expression. Overshadowing painting, it is also hailed as the supreme visual art form in Chinese culture.

By absorbing merits of legendary calligraphers from earlier times, famed Song calligraphers including Su Shi (1037-1101), Huang Tingjian (1045-1105), Mi Fu (1051-1107) and also Emperor Huizong, invented their own styles, widely imitated by calligraphy buffs even today.

In the drama, Emperor Renzong is keen on practicing calligraphy and excels at the lesser-known but rather characteristic calligraphy style called Fei Bai Shu, aka Flying White, which requires a flat painting brush. As its name suggests, this style places an emphasis on the moving force of the brush and the abundance of the streaks of white within strokes.

A poster for Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a calligraphy piece as the backdrop. [Photo/douban.com]


A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy shows Princess Huirou, Emperor Renzong's daughter, arranging flowers. [Photo/douban.com]

Flower arrangement

Flowers delicately arranged in porcelain vases in the drama are also a huge delight for the eyes.

Traditional Chinese flower arrangement originated from the Northern and Southern dynasties (420-589) and bloomed in the Tang and Song dynasties (607-1279).

Aside from serving the purposes of palace rituals and worship in temple, floral arrangement was revered by Song literati as one of "the four arts of life" along with incense burning, tea drinking and painting appreciation, which they used to express emotions, cultivate character and amuse themselves.

A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy shows Empress Cao, Emperor Renzong's wife, arranging flowers. [Photo/douban.com]


A still from Serenade of Peaceful Joyfeatures a hollowed-out copper incense burner. [Photo/douban.com]

Incense burning

Unlike modern people who spray perfume to scent the air and body, ancient Chinese people were fond of burning incense made of fragrant wood and herbs, for an aesthetically pleasing atmosphere and naturally perfumed bodies.

That's why scenes with incense smoke curling upwards from animal-shaped copper burners or porcelain ones are pervasive in the drama.

Dating from the Shang Dynasty (c. 17th-11th BC), incense burning was initially and also essentially a part of worshipping practices to show respect to gods and ancestors.

In addition, ancient Chinese also burnt incense to tell time, repel insects and promote health with medicinal aromatic blends. Furthermore, literati in the Tang and Song dynasties held incense appreciation gatherings where they might also sip tea, listen to zither tunes, compose poetry and discuss painting.

A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features a copper incense burner and a porcelain one. [Photo/douban.com]


A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features dian cha, a popular tea drinking method during the Song eras. [Photo/v.qq.com]

Innovative tea drinking (dian cha)

Chinese culture has been steeped in tea drinking ever since the legendary Shennong (god of agriculture) serendipitously discovered this drink some five millennia ago.

Built on the rapid progress in tea plantation, tea processing and tea culture studies in previous dynasties, the Song eras saw a huge breakthrough in the way of tea drinking.

A scene from Serenade of Peaceful Joy features the tea-whisking contest during dian cha, a popular tea drinking method during the Song eras. [Photo/v.qq.com]

Unlike the Tang people who cooked tea with spices and ate the tea leaves afterwards, Song people revolutionized the practice with a new tea drinking method called dian cha, which was enjoyed as a recreation by people from all walks of life, as evidenced by a large number of tea houses depicted in the famed painting Along the River During the Qingming Festival (Qingming Shanghe Tu), which reenacted the bustling street scenes of the Northern Song (960-1127) capital Dongjing, today's Kaifeng in Henan province.

Dian cha, which inspired Japan's matcha tea ceremony, involves whipping the mixture of water and ground tea powder with a bamboo brush in a bowl to create a fine frothy drink. Tea connoisseurs were often drawn to tea-whisking contests where the winner was the one whose froth lasted the longest.

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2020-05-12 11:09:16
<![CDATA[Xi's article on cultural protection, exchange to be published]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/01/content_1474804.htm BEIJING -- An article by President Xi Jinping on the protection and exchange of the Chinese culture, especially the Dunhuang culture, will be published Saturday on Qiushi Journal, a flagship magazine of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee.

The article is the transcript of a speech by Xi, also general secretary of the CPC Central Committee and chairman of the Central Military Commission, at a symposium at the Dunhuang Academy in August, 2019.

The article hails the Dunhuang culture as a result of the long-term cultural exchanges and mutual learning between Chinese civilization and other civilizations, and points out that the Dunhuang culture shows the Chinese nation's confidence in its culture.

It also emphasizes the need for advancing the study of Dunhuang culture to serve the joint construction of the Belt and Road.

Efforts should be made to further promote the Chinese culture, cultural exchanges between China and countries along the Belt and Road, as well as people-to-people exchanges, says the article.

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2020-02-01 17:14:30
<![CDATA[Over 1,000 scenic spots waive entry fees for medics]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/28/content_1476376.htm

A visitor takes photos at Baotu spring, Jinan city, Shandong province, Feb 27, 2020. Some tourist attractions in low-risk regions of the novel coronavirus outbreak have gradually reopened to the public.[Photo/Xinhua]

After the novel coronavirus outbreak, many scenic spots in China have decided to waive entrance fees for the country's medical workers in a gesture of gratitude for their efforts and sacrifices at the front line of the epidemic fight.

According to statistics released by Ctrip, China's biggest online travel agency, as of Feb 20, over 1,000 tourist attractions around China have adopted the free-entry policy for the nation's medical workers. The move involves nearly 200 cities and covers a large variety of sightseeing attractions ranging from natural wonders and heritage sites to theme parks, museums and cruise liners.

But specific measures have varied in different regions. Hubei province, the center of the novel coronavirus outbreak, has granted all medical teams that aided the province free admission to its top tourist sites for five years.The provincial cultural and tourism department will issue a card to all outside medical team members that can provide unlimited free visits to the top-rated Class-A tourist sites in the province before Dec 31, 2024. Local medical staff can visit these sites for free using their medical credentials for two years, the department said.

In Southwest China's Sichuan province, a growing number of scenic areas including the Leshan Giant Buddha, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, announced they would open free of charge to the nation's doctors and nurses within a year after they resume business.

Guilin, a southern Chinese city known for its picturesque karst mountains and beautiful rivers, announced that it would waive the entrance fees to 80 tourist sites for medical workers this year, according to the city's culture, radio and television and tourism bureau.

In Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, the free-entry policy will cover 23 scenic areas, four museums and the ancient city wall. Medical workers can take sightseeing buses free of charge in the city.


Fragrant Hills in suburban Beijing witnessed traffic jams last weekend after a large number of tourists swarmed into the forest park. Its management bureau later shut down indoor areas and closed five parking lots from Monday in an effort to limit the number of tourists.[Photo/Xinhua]

Carefully reopening

Some tourist attractions in low-risk regions of the novel coronavirus outbreak have gradually reopened to the public, Liu Kezhi, an official with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, said Wednesday.

Liu further stressed that scenic spots often host large numbers of people, so the resumption should be guided by local governments after an overall assessment of conditions and necessity.

Liu said reopening tourist attractions in regions with a lower risk of infection should be approved by local governments and that such attractions in high-risk areas should remain closed for now.

On Tuesday night, the ministry issued a set of guidelines requiring real-name ticketing along with tourist contact and transportation information and encouraging full use of big data-powered technology to monitor tourist information in real time as scenic attractions have gradually started reopening.

The guidelines also noted that scenic spots that are set to reopen should strictly control the daily maximum capacity and offer online ticket booking services to avoid crowds. Tourists should have their temperatures taken and wear masks before entering as well.

The ministry also required scenic spots to monitor and report their employees' health conditions and beef up hygiene and epidemic control at major sites. Venues or activities that could draw large crowds should remain shut.

Statistics from the online travel agency Ctrip showed that, nationwide, more than 300 major scenic spots were open to the public this week, more than 10 times the previous week.

Fragrant Hills in suburban Beijing witnessed traffic jams last weekend after a large number of tourists swarmed into the forest park. Its management bureau later shut down indoor areas and closed five parking lots from Monday in an effort to limit the number of tourists.

Shanghai also rolled out a guideline for the municipality's A-grade tourist attractions to combat the novel coronavirus epidemic.

Tourist attractions will reopen gradually depending on the city's epidemic prevention and control situation. Temporary isolation spots should be set up and materials such as face masks, gloves, medical alcohol and disinfectant should be prepared in scenic areas, according to the guideline.

Scenic spots are encouraged to introduce an online prebooking system and limit the flow of tourists. The daily maximum capacity should be halved, and relevant information should be made public, the guideline said.

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2020-02-28 15:47:44
<![CDATA[China moves to bail out culture, tourism enterprises hit by virus outbreak]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/27/content_1476231.htm Chinese authorities have rolled out multiple measures to help enterprises weather the storm as the country put on hold all public art, cultural and tourism activities due to the novel coronavirus outbreak, said an official Wednesday.

Halting these activities has helped effectively curb the virus spreading, but also put culture and tourism enterprises in a difficult situation, said Liu Kezhi with the Ministry of Culture and Tourism at a press conference.

The ministry has worked with other authorities to bail out these enterprises, offering special funds, favorable financial policies, tax exemption, cost-reducing measures and better administrative services, he said.

The ministry also worked with the National Development and Reform Commission to earmark nearly 3.34 billion yuan (about $475.98 million) in the central government budget for investment to support 343 projects of tourism infrastructure and public-service facilities, according to Liu.

Liu said the ministry also improved online services to make it more convenient for the enterprises to learn about bail-out measures rolled out by the central and local governments.

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2020-02-27 09:00:00
<![CDATA[China beefs up scenic area management amid coronavirus epidemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476149.htm China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism has asked scenic areas nationwide to continue implementing epidemic control measures and closely monitor tourist information, according to a set of guidelines issued Tuesday by the ministry.

The guidelines required real-name ticketing, registration of tourists' contact and travel information and big data-powered monitoring of tourist information as scenic attractions have gradually started reopening to the public.

Scenic spots in regions with a high risk of the novel coronavirus epidemic, however, should remain closed for the time being, the guidelines read.

The scenic spots that are to reopen should strictly control tourist volume and avoid crowds. Tourists should have their temperatures taken and wear masks before entrance.

The ministry also required scenic spots to monitor and report their employees' health conditions and beef up hygiene and epidemic control at major venues.

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2020-02-26 08:55:00
<![CDATA[China issues guideline on public libraries reopening amid virus battle]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476151.htm China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism issued a guideline Tuesday to direct steady efforts made by public libraries and cultural centers for epidemic prevention and control and their reopening.

There is no "one size for all" policy for site reopenings, of which procedures vary depending on if a site's location is deemed to be a region of high, medium or low epidemic risk, according to the guideline.

In high-risk regions, public libraries and cultural centers will remain closed, while in medium- or low-risk regions, opening sites will be decided by local authorities.

The sites are required to continue to give priority to and make unremitting efforts in epidemic prevention and control.

Venues preparing to reopen should make plans in advance and put in place sound measures, which are subject to timely and dynamic adjustments in accordance with the latest guidance on epidemic prevention and control from local authorities to ensure security, according to the guideline.

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2020-02-26 09:05:00
<![CDATA[Reopening of museums postponed in high-risk outbreak regions]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/02/content_1476464.htm

Museums, memorials and cultural heritage sites in low-risk outbreak regions will be allowed to gradually resume operations with the prior permission of local authorities,according to a circular recently issued by the National Cultural Heritage Administration.[Photo/Xinhua]

All sorts of museums, memorials and cultural heritage sites in high-risk regions of the COVID-19 epidemic should postpone reopening to the public, according to a circular recently issued by the National Cultural Heritage Administration.

The administration also called for implementing strict epidemic prevention measures amid work resumption and avoiding a sweeping approach in resuming the operation of museums and cultural heritage sites.

Museums, memorials and cultural heritage sites in low-risk outbreak regions will be allowed to gradually resume operations with the prior permission of local authorities. And open areas of cultural heritage sites and ruins-based museums in medium-risk regions can resume opening to the public in an orderly manner, while their indoor areas shall remain closed, read the circular.

The circular advised related cultural institutions to employ real name online reservations to control the number of visitors and continue providing a range of online services to the public.

Major cultural heritage protection projects related to the Great Wall, the Grand Canal and the Long March, as well as the urgent salvaging of cultural relics, will be given priority in work resumption after being granted clearance by local authorities, according to the circular.

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2020-03-02 16:03:04
<![CDATA[UNESCO holds first virtual conference with ministers]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/26/content_1478990.htm

Culture ministers from across the world attend a UNESCO meeting to discuss the current challenges brought upon the creative industry by the COVID-19 pandemic, on April 22, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On April 22, culture ministers from over 130 countries shared, through an online meeting organized by UNESCO, their remarks on the impact of the COVID-19 health emergency on the cultural sector, as well as on the responses being initiated within their respective policies frameworks.

UNESCO's Director-General Audrey Azoulay said culture plays a vital role in coping with crisis and reviving economy after the pandemic. She called for deeper international cooperation and an open dialogue sharing experience and knowledge.

Zhang Xu, Chinese vice-minister of Culture and Tourism, introduced the current improvement in China under the most comprehensive prevention and control measures.

According to Zhang, China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism has taken timely steps to soften the blow of coronavirus outbreak in the cultural sector, which include postponement of cultural activities, financial support for culture and tourism businesses, bringing cultural events online, and cultivation of digital culture.

Over the eight-hour session, ministers spoke passionately about the need for global collaboration to ensure the creative sector survived the pandemic. Many considered online operations a crucial pivot for the culture industry, which could now be a permanent fixture for many institutions.

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2020-04-26 10:20:00
<![CDATA[Thai host teaches Mandarin online in Bangkok]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/11/content_1479483.htm

The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On May 10, the China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms.

The 100 classes will be successively held as a general introduction to Mandarin. The course is designed by a professor specialized in Chinese language teaching from a Thailand Mandarin school, based on his decades of teaching experience and the preferences of Thai people.

The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Presented by a well-known host in Thailand, the content of the class is humorous and easy to follow, suitable for people to learn Chinese at home.

The center has produced seven online classes about Chinese language, three on guzheng (Chinese zither) for the convenience of the local people to learn Mandarin and Chinese culture during the COVID-19 epidemic.


The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Bangkok launched an online Mandarin class on Facebook, Line, WeChat and other social media platforms on May 10, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-11 11:18:48
<![CDATA[NCPA launches series of online concerts]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/09/content_1479468.htm

The NCPA has launched a series of online concerts. [Photo provided to China Daily]

The National Centre for the Performing Arts has launched a series of online concerts, which kicks off on May 9.

Titled Sound of Summer Blossoms, the series of online concerts will be held till June 27.

The first online concert on May 9 will have NCPA Orchestra perform under the baton of conductor Lyu Jia, featuring repertories by Ludwig van Beethoven, including Symphony no 6 in F major, Op. 68 Pastoral and Symphony No. 1 in C major, in celebrating the 250th anniversary of the birth of the German composer.

It will be the first concert held at the NCPA concert hall since Jan 22 due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The concert will also be broadcast live through online streaming by 22 art organizations, including theaters, opera houses and symphony orchestras from 16 countries, including Wiener Staatsoper, the Philadelphia Orchestra, and Alexandrov Ensemble.

Conductor Lyu Jia. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-05-09 18:15:41
<![CDATA[Mosaic lamps in Hong Kong]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/13/content_1479583.htm

Learning about Turkey through their famous lamps.

Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-05-13 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Chinese bamboo culture delights Fijians]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479498.htm

"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Fiji has recently put a photo exhibition on its new media platforms highlighting bamboo, a plant that has played a significant role in Chinese culture and people's daily lives since ancient times.

Titled "Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", the show is centered around four different aspects of bamboo: Realm, Voice, Art and Use. Dozens of photographs taken around the country over the past decades showcase how bamboo has evolved into a unique "bamboo culture" in China.

Realizing the diverse practicality of bamboo, Chinese people have made the plant an indispensable part in their daily lives, where it is widely used in food, clothing, housing and transportation.

Bamboo is also valued as a symbol of moral integrity, modesty and loyalty, making it a frequent motif in Chinese literature, music, painting and decorative art.

The photo show, part of the Visit China Online series launched by the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, can be viewed on the center's accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat.


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


"Oriental Aesthetics ?Bamboo Culture", an online photo exhibition, is being held by the China Cultural Center in Fiji on its accounts on Facebook, Twitter and WeChat. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-12 13:36:40
<![CDATA[Visiting Beijing online launched in Mauritius]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/11/content_1479495.htm

A girl walks in the Palace Museum. [Photo/Xinhua]

The China Cultural Center in Mauritius recently launched a series of online exhibitions and film shows about Beijing.

Locals are able to get to know about the capital city's traditional architecture, cuisine, medicine, and its modern look, for example the newly-built Daxing International Airport, from these virtual shows.

As a part of Visiting China Online, the Beijing culture series was very popular on social media and received high praise from the people of Mauritius.

Later, the center will launch other series about more places in China, including Central China's Hubei and Henan provinces, and South China's Guangdong province and Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region.

The Palace Museum. [Photo/Xinhua]


Peking Opera. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-05-11 15:00:53
<![CDATA[Nanjing to host International Museum Day activities]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479503.htm

Nanjing, capital of Jiangsu province, will become the host city for China's main activities during International Museum Day, which falls on May 18. It was announced by the National Cultural Heritage Administration in Beijing on Monday.

Nanjing Museum, one of the biggest provincial-level museums in China, will become this year's home venue and is about to launch a highlighted exhibition on that day showcasing about 200 cultural relics ranging from the Spring and Autumn period (770-476 BC) to Han Dynasty (206 BC to AD 220) on loan from collections across the country. Other special exhibitions will be staged around the city starting that day.

Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, this year's International Museum Day events were once planned to be entirely held "on cloud", but China's containment of the virus enabled the original plan to be largely maintained.

Nevertheless, the number of participants at activities will be controlled, and essential measures will be taken to ensure visitors' safety.

On May 18, a donation ceremony will be held in Nanjing Museum commemorating its collection of artifacts related to the COVID-19 outbreak. A digital platform providing easy access for virtual museum exhibitions around the country will also go online that day.

International Museum Day was initiated by International Council of Museums, or ICOM, in 1977. Since 2009, China has annually chosen a host city for a national celebration of museums in modern life.

For this year's event, a symposium is to be held in Nanjing on the future development of world's museums in the context of cultural diversity. It will also be "attended" by scholars from ICOM, the United Kingdom, South Korea and the United States through webcam.

This is in keeping with this year's theme for the celebration ?"Museums for Equality: Diversity and Inclusion".

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2020-05-12 10:10:01
<![CDATA[Kintsugi in Hong Kong]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479502.htm

This ancient art from Japan revitalizes broken potteries and turns them into something more beautiful.

Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-05-12 10:41:13
<![CDATA[Murray House in Hong Kong]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/11/content_1479496.htm

This fine granite structure is one of Hong Kong's oldest and longest surviving buildings.

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2020-05-11 15:20:44
<![CDATA[Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to students]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479500.htm

The Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students in the country, May 9, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On May 9, the Chinese embassy to Pakistan sent health packages to Chinese students in the country. This is the third time the embassy provided the students with necessities to fight against the COVID-19 epidemic.

Representing the Chinese Ambassador to Pakistan Yao Jing, Zhang Heqing, cultural counselor from the embassy and director of the China Cultural Center in Pakistan, and other Chinese officials and representatives from cultural exchange institutions attended the package handover.

The 600 packages to students included masks, disinfection supplies and patented Chinese medicine, such as Lianhua Qingwen Capsule.

Zhang said the health and safety of the Chinese students in Pakistan is always a concern of the government. He hoped the students could enhance self-protection and keep a sanguine attitude during the epidemic.


The Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students in the country, May 9, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-05-12 13:28:47
<![CDATA[Remembering Tagore on his birth anniversary]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479505.htm

Chinese and Indian students and scholars take part in a micro-documentary to mark the 159th birth anniversary of Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore on Friday.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A micro-documentary that went online on Friday showed students and scholars from various cities in China singing in Bengali and Indian students and academics doing the same in Mandarin. They were marking the 159th birth anniversary of the poet Rabindranath Tagore and the 70th anniversary of the establishment of Sino-India diplomatic ties.

It seems a befitting tribute to a man regarded as "a father figure of India-China cultural relations in the modern era".

The poet was born on May 7, 1861, but his birth anniversary is usually marked according to the Bengali calendar, which fell on Friday.

The micro-documentary, aptly titled Gitanjali, was produced in a week. It's an ensemble of poetry, song, music, dance and art dedicated to a man who was himself a poet, novelist, playwright, musician and artist, and who played a pivotal role in building a golden bridge between the two ancient civilizations and neighbors.

The program was directed by Beijing-based author and media professional Suvam Pal. It has been produced by Pandit Sarit Das, a percussionist who is also a visiting faculty at China's Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing. He has composed or arranged a major portion of the music for the program, complete with popular Indian string instruments like the sitar, percussion instrument tabla, a rare string instrument predominantly used in Rabindra Sangeet called esraj, and a slew of traditional Chinese instruments like pipa, guzheng and yangqin, apart from popular Western instruments like the piano and guitar.


Chinese and Indian students and scholars take part in a micro-documentary to mark the 159th birth anniversary of Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore on Friday.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Beijing-based Bharatnatyam exponent Jin Shanshan has specially created dance moves in the mould of Rabindra Nritya, a dance genre from Santiniketan, for the independent project, while an Indian classical dancer and Tsinghua University scholar, Reshmita Nath, dances to a Tagore classic sung by a group of Chinese students who are studying Bengali.

Shenzhen-based graphics designer Qin Xiaoping, who studied fine arts at Visva-Bharati University in Santiniketan a couple of decades ago, has used the Chinese pen drawing style to draw a portrait of Tagore, who began painting after the age of 60.

The project is a result of the collaboration among students, scholars and faculty members from China's Peking University, Tsinghua University, the Communication University of China, Yunnan Minzu University, the United Kingdom's University of Bath, and India's Visva-Bharati and Doon University, as well as professionals from different cities in India, China and the UK.

The program was separately shot by the performers using their cellphone cameras in Delhi, Mumbai, Dehradun, Bengaluru, Bolpur, Jorhat, Bath, Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Yuncheng and Kunming.

The performers are aged from 9 to 91, indicating how Tagore's works transcend age and generations. Portions of a poem from one of Tagore's anthologies, Stray Birds, a Mandarin translation of which is popular in China, have been recited in Mandarin by Deborshmi Nath, a 9-year-old Indian student from Beijing, while 91-year-old Tan Chung, an eminent historian and son of late professor Tan Yun-Shan, the founder of Cheena Bhavan at Visva-Bharati, shared his thoughts on Tagore, who visited China in 1924 and 1929 and was given the Chinese name Zhu Zhendan by Chinese scholar Liang Qichao.

"This is a special tribute to Tagore by his admirers in both India and China as we have also made an effort to recalibrate our story-telling process under the new normal due to COVID-19," says Pal.

The program's creative producer and editor is Showbhik Chowdhury and advisor is professor Yukteshwar Kumar.

 


Chinese and Indian students and scholars take part in a micro-documentary to mark the 159th birth anniversary of Indian poet Rabindranath Tagore on Friday. CHINA DAILY

 

 

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2020-05-12 09:29:54
<![CDATA[National Art Museum of China to reopen with daily cap of visitors]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/12/content_1479509.htm The National Art Museum of China will reopen from Wednesday with a daily cap of 500 visitors, as the country is opening up its public venues in an orderly manner after the coronavirus epidemic eases.

Reservations via the museum's official website and its WeChat account are essential, and visitors are required to present their identity cards, personal health codes and reservation records for entry, according to a notice issued by the museum on Monday.

During their visits, visitors need to wear masks, keep a distance of at least one meter from others and avoid gatherings, read the notice.

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2020-05-12 08:23:51
<![CDATA[Tai Tam Reservoirs in Hong Kong]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/09/content_1479413.htm

This is the largest water facility built more than a century ago in Hong Kong to help with the urbanization of the island.

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2020-05-09 09:50:44
<![CDATA[Exoskeleton delivery may lead future of industry]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/08/content_1479402.htm

Wearing a robot exoskeleton, a worker for food delivery service Eleme appeared on a Shanghai street on April 20. He carried three take-out boxes on his back. The hashtag "Robot exoskeleton for food delivery" has been viewed more than 20 million times on Sina Weibo as of Thursday.

It comes as no surprise then that a pilot testing program is underway, involving robot developer ULS Robotics and Eleme to explore the potential of exoskeleton suits in the delivery sector. 

Read more: Exoskeleton tech sheds light on future delivery

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2020-05-08 12:51:36
<![CDATA[Nan Lian Garden in Hong Kong]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/08/content_1479400.htm

A stroll in this serene garden will take you back to a thousand years ago.

Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-05-08 12:27:47
<![CDATA[China's first horticulture documentary gains attention]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/07/content_1479398.htm

China's first such horticulture documentary, "The Signature of Flowers'' recently ran on CCTV­1 and CCTV­9 over May 1­5,and brought attention from gardening enthusiasts.

The five-episode documentary series revisits the historical chapters about some plants from China taken overseas a few centuries ago, as well as tracing the latest discoveries by top domestic botanists.

The production was shot over two years, with its crew traveling to 21 provinces and regions in China and nearly 20 cities in Britain, France, the United States, Japan and the Netherlands.

Focused on camellia, rhododendron, Chinese rose, chrysanthemum and peony in each episode, the series displays some scenarios not filmed by domestic television producers earlier.

Such shots include a 15-­day filming of the flowering process of Xueta (snow tower), a variety of camellia which is famous in China; and an expedition team's trek to the highlands of the Tibet autonomous region for rare rhododendrons.

Huang Yinghao, the chief director of the series, says he first had the idea to produce the documentary in 2017, when a friend presented him American writer Michael Pollan's "The Botany of Desire: A Plant's­Eye View of the World''.

"Pollan had a fresh perspective on plants," says Huang, adding that the book taught him to adopt an unprecedented way to observe plants. "Flowers have been on Earth before humans. It's interesting to imagine how they think about us, who appeared on the planet much later."

With the question haunting him, Huang with his TV crew members met Zhou Xiaolin, a self­made horticulturist who has leased a valley covering 800,000 square meters to plant various species of flowers on the outskirts of Chengdu in Sichuan province.

One night in a cabin inside Zhou's garden, Huang shaped the draft, planning to collect interesting stories about flowers that have bridged the East and West by tracing the plants' native areas in China and their presence in foreign lands.

From Paris to London, Huang interviewed some renowned European botanists and gardeners, including Roy Lancaster, vice-president of the Royal Horticultural Society, and Richard Deverell, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

When Huang was shooting an episode of the series in Europe, his colleague, Han Zhen, director of the second episode, was with his team in Karma Valley on the eastern slopes of Qomolangma, or Mount Everest, in 2018.

As the most expensive journey for the documentary, Han had 13 yaks transporting tents and supplies for the filming team of more than 10 members.

In nine days, they hiked nearly 120 kilometers in the valley, climbing several peaks every day, with the highest altitude reaching around 5,300 meters.

The "Signature of Flowers'' marks Han's first attempt at directing a documentary on plants, and it has changed his view of the world.

"Gardening is a way to understand time. You have to slow down to taste the beauty of life and nature," he said.

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2020-05-07 23:50:57
<![CDATA[An ode to friendship between China and Egypt released]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/08/content_1479395.htm

Singer Chen Beibei performs the new song released by the China Cultural Center in Cairo. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The China Cultural Center in Cairo released a new song,Xie Shou Bing Jian(Hand in Hand), dedicated to the coming 64th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relation between China and Egypt on May 30.

Composed by Chinese celebrated musician Wang Li, the song's lyrics were written by Minister Counselor of the Chinese embassy in Egypt and the center's director Shi Yuewen. Singer Chen Beibei sang the song.

The piece highlights not only the long-lasting friendship between the two nations but also the moving stories concerning the fight against the COVID-19 epidemic in both countries.

An Arabic version of the song will be released soon.

Xie Shou Bing Jian ( Hand in Hand), a new song dedicated to the coming 64th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relation between China and Egypt on May 30. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-08 15:01:18
<![CDATA[New Zealand China Culture Center’s tai chi classes go online]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-05/07/content_1479322.htm

The Online Taichi Chains class launched by the China Culture Center in Wellington shows students practicing taijiquan at home during the epidemic.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

Since "staying at home" has become normal for New Zealanders, the tai chi class at the China Cultural Center in Wellington has moved its teaching activities into an online classroom. The Online Tai Chi Chains activity initiated by the center is quietly spreading on Tiktok in the form of short videos.

Zhang Jianyong, the martial arts teacher at the China Cultural Center in Wellington, uploaded the short videos of tai chi, which he shot and edited, to many social media platforms, such as Tiktok and Youtube and won a lot of praise. The cultural center launched two rounds of Online Tai Chi 24 Moves Chains activities for Chinese and English tai chi classes.

Each tai chi participant first signs up in a WeChat work group, and each person receives designated moves according to the number who signed up, and then makes a short video of his practice and sends it to the work group. Zhang, the person in charge of the online classroom will edit a complete short video of the 24 tai chi moves, which will be uploaded to each major social platform. Zhang Jianyong said that the 24 tai chi moves is a set of entry-level taijiquan compiled by the Chinese martial arts circle. It is simple and suitable for all ages and is an excellent course for strengthening the body during the epidemic period.


David Mackenzie of Wellington practices taijiquanduring the epidemic.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

Many students have changed into training clothes, some of which are white and some are red. Tai Chi participants practice in their backyards and living rooms, completing the 24 moves.

David Mackenzie, one of the most active students in tai chi class, loves Chinese tai chi and traditional Chinese medicine culture. He believes that he can continuously improve his immunity through tai chi sports and is more confident in dealing with this unexpected epidemic.

The overseas Chinese leader of Wellington, Zhang Hanhua, is generally fond of taiji sports and tea culture. This time, he not only actively participates in taiji jielong, but also uploaded personal practice videos on Facebook and made a speech: "What should I do to stay like this? Of course, tai chi is the best choice!"


Fen Mackenzie, one of the heads of the Wellington Tai Chi Association, loves Chinese tai chi and practices taijiquanduring the epidemic.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

At present, it is not only tai chi teaching that has been moved online by the Wellington China Culture Center. During the outbreak, the center’s official Facebook displays not only the landscape, customs, flavors, customs of South China’s Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, but also updates many world heritage sites in China every day, so that New Zealand audiences can browse these relics.

Guo Zongguang, director of the China Cultural Center in Wellington, said that the current global state of "staying at home" is a challenge and opportunity for cultural communication and tourism promotion to explore new ways of communication. It is hoped that with the help of the internet, China's rich cultural and tourism resources can effectively spread to all places.


Yi Shusen, a tai chi student at the China Cultural Center in Wellington, insists on practicing taijiquanat home during the epidemic.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


Zhang Hanhu, Wellington overseas Chinese leader, insists on practicing taijiquanat home during the epidemic.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


Zhang Jianyong, teaching director of the Wellington China Culture Center, makes short online teaching videos of "online tai chi".[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

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2020-05-07 16:32:55
<![CDATA[Chinese ethnic costumes dazzle in online exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/30/content_1479213.htm

An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29.

People can access the show on the center's WeChat account and other social media sites, such as Facebook and Instagram.


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

China is a diverse country home to 56 different ethnic groups, each with their own distinctive cultural heritage, which is often beautifully reflected in their costumes.

The exhibition aims to spotlight Chinese ethnic groups and their culture through the embroidery, accessories and patterns on the costumes.


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-04-30 14:24:29
<![CDATA[Chinese ethnic costumes dazzle in online exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/30/content_1479198.htm

An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29.

People can access the show on the center's WeChat account and other social media sites, such as Facebook and Instagram.

China is a diverse country home to 56 different ethnic groups, each with their own distinctive cultural heritage, which is often beautifully reflected in their costumes.

The exhibition aims to spotlight Chinese ethnic groups and their culture through the embroidery, accessories and patterns on the costumes.


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online exhibition featuring Chinese ethnic costumes was launched on the website of the China Cultural Center in Sydney on April 29. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-04-30 14:24:29
<![CDATA[Bird-watching festival to open on Labor Day in Ningxia]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/28/content_1479140.htm

Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migratory birds are spotted at the Sand Lake scenic area in Shizuishan, Northwest China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. From March to October, the region becomes a sanctuary for many species such as sandpipers, herons and pochards. The 9th International Bird Watching Festival will begin during the Labor Day holiday. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-04-28 15:00:00
<![CDATA[Homemade bento box lunches popular with those returning to work]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/28/content_1479138.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

People all over China have gradually returned to the workplace after a long period of home confinement due to the outbreak of COVID­19.

Although people can, for the most part, once again dine at restaurants and order food delivery like they did before the pandemic cut a swath through daily life, some people are choose to make their own lunch ?a practice that started as a safety measure, but has now become a habit. These homemade meals please the eye and the taste buds, as creative cooks use ingredients in imaginative ways.

Zhang Lulu, an office worker from Beijing, believes preparing her bento box has made her more self disciplined. "It's never too late to make a change," she said.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-04-28 17:14:20
<![CDATA[Video: How to make traditional steamed grouper]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/28/content_1479096.htm

Ingredients

1 fresh grouper

(approx. 900g)

2 dried mushrooms

approx.70g lean pork meet

5 - 6 juliennes of ginger

1 stalk each of coriander and scallion

4 - 5 Tbsps cooking oil

Marinade

1 tsp Shaoxing wine

1/2 tsp oyster sauce

1/2 tsp light soy sauce

1 tsp corn starch

1/2 tsp granulated sugar

1 tsp cooking oil

Instructions

1. Scale the grouper with a paring knife. Rinse inside and out and pat dry. Sprinkle a pinch of salt on both sides. Sprinkle the ginger julienne on top.

2. Soak the dried mushrooms in hot water for 1 hour until soft. Remove the stem and julienne.

3. Rinse the pork and cut into shreds. Mix with the mushrooms and marinade in a large bowl. Marinade for 10 mins.

4. When done, briefly stir fry in pan (no need to add oi) and pour on top of the plate of fish.

Traditional steamed grouper. [Photo by Grace Choy/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

To Steam

1. Using electric steamer, steam for 8 mins (whole process); or

2. On the stovetop: wrap in heat resistant cling wrap and put in wok when the water boils, steam on high heat for 8 mins.

3. While steaming the fish, rinse and chop the coriander and scallion.

4. When time is up, take out the fish. Remove the accumulated liquid on the plate. Lay the chopped coriander and scallion on the fish and pour hot oil on top. Finally, drizzle some sweet soy sauce and serve.

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2020-04-28 14:00:00
<![CDATA[Chinese and Egyptian musicians]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/26/content_1478991.htm

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2020-04-26 10:56:39
<![CDATA[Documentary on Wuhan's COVID-19 battle broadcast in Kazakhstan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/26/content_1478989.htm

The documentary Epicenter ?24 Hours in Wuhan, depicting the arduous battle against novel coronavirus in Central China's Hubei province, was translated into Kazakh language and aired on prime time TV on April 18.

Nussipzhanov Yertay, a Kazakhstan producer and translator, led his team to finish the final translated version within only four days, offering Kazakhstani people first-hand information on virus prevention.

Focusing on ordinary Chinese such as medical workers, deliverymen, and volunteers, the documentary celebrates the compassion and immense courage of people in the time of great challenge and difficulty.

"The rigorous precautionary measures adopted by Chinese doctors left a profound impression on me," Yertay said. "China's experience in anti-virus battle proves to be a great asset for other countries."

In the past few month, Sinologists, translators and publishers around the world have been introducing China's effective medical strategy to their own countries, via books, pamphlets and videos. Many, including Nussipzhanov Yertay, are members of the Culture Translation and Studies Support Network.

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2020-04-26 10:30:00
<![CDATA[Solidarity is most powerful weapon against pandemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/21/content_1478860.htm

This film is dedicated to someone who has dedicated himself to the epidemic!

After the night, the sun rises as usual!

The COVID-19 epidemic has affected 200 countries and regions in the world. Many countries have declared a state of emergency and upgraded prevention and control measures. The global fight against the epidemic is urgent.

People in Northwest China’s Gansu province have given help in a timely manner, and donated protective clothing, surgical masks and other medical supplies to the autonomous region of Navarra, Spain, Alba county in Romania, Italy, Qom province in Iran, Germbois city in France, Grodno state in Belarus and other international friendly locations.

Solidarity is the most powerful weapon in the global campaign against COVID 19. China is working with the rest of the world to help each other overcome difficulties, and people will win in the end win against the global epidemic.

The Gansu provincial Department of Culture and Tourism in China released a promotional film, We are the World, to salute and greet anti-epidemic workers from all over the world.

Right now, we can't go out and enjoy the beautiful spring light given by nature. We look forward to an early end of the epidemic.

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2020-04-21 17:43:13
<![CDATA[Free online English course on Shakespeare now available]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/21/content_1478846.htm

British Council, the UK's international organization for promoting cultural relations and educational opportunities, launched a free, six-week online English course earlier this month to look at the life, works and legacy of William Shakespeare, while giving participants the chance to practice their English language skills.

The course, titled Exploring English: Shakespeare, started on April 6. It was created in partnership with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, and looks at Shakespeare's life and works, including five of his most popular plays: Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Much Ado About Nothing, Hamletand The Tempest.

Each week the course looks at the plays with the help of actors and experts from around the world, then examines their lasting influence on the English language, as well as talking about modern songs and films that have been influenced by them. Participants can do listening and reading practice via this online course, and they can also record themselves speaking some of Shakespeare's lines.

This is the seventh run of the course. The program was first launched in 2016 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, as part of the global Shakespeare Lives celebration. To date, more than 230,000 people from all over the world have enrolled in this online course.

To learn more about the course, please click here 

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2020-04-21 14:10:56
<![CDATA[Strings sing online in spring]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/21/content_1478827.htm

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2020-04-21 08:44:18
<![CDATA['A Sunny Day']]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/20/content_1478767.htm

Video provided to China Daily

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2020-04-20 10:10:38
<![CDATA[Zither player strikes right chord in videos of music]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/17/content_1478690.htm

Adorned in traditional Chinese red clothing and seated in front of a guzheng, or a Chinese zither, a young Chinese woman in the streets of France softly yet swiftly strokes her fingers on the traditional Chinese musical instrument and fills the atmosphere with bouncing notes from the song Shanghai Bund, attracting a group of bystanders who tap their feet and enjoy the music.

Such videos by the Chinese internet user Pengpengpengpengpeng have gone viral on the internet, sweeping up more than 6 million fans and 60 million likes.

"That's just amazing, it filled my soul with vitality. I loved the pieces she played, I've only heard this kind of music in Chinese films," a foreign user commented. "So beautiful like a sea glittering in sun and fishes making piruets. For me this sounds like a happy music. The performer is beautiful like a dream and her clothes and the instrument too. Endlessly thanks," commented YouTube user Magdalena.

The 25-year-old zither player, whose name is Peng Jingxuan, is a master's degree candidate in France. The videos were shot prior to the COVID-19 outbreak and she posted them in hopes of cheering people up in these tough times. "Many may be anxious or sad because of the outbreak and I wanted to post some videos to ease the tension. Music can always heal," Peng said.

Peng, a native of Central China's Hunan province, began studying for her master's degree in music in 2017 at the Conservatoire de Bordeaux after graduating from Wuhan Conservatory of Music with a major in Chinese folk musical instruments.

"I've played the guzheng for many years. My studies now don't require me to play it but I didn't want to lose my touch, so I brought it over with me."

Each weekend, Peng would put on traditional Han Chinese garb and play her guzheng on the streets of France, leaving her footprints and notes in front of the Grand Theatre of Bordeaux, the Eiffel Tower and near the banks of the Seine. At first she only wanted to test her courage without ever knowing that the "habit" would accompany her for two years.

"I've played nearly 130 songs. When I hear people clapping for me at the end of a show, I am always filled with national pride. My motherland is strong and we have these cultural treasures. So I always proudly tell them 'This is a guzheng, and it's from China, with more than 3,000 years of history.'" Peng always prepares small pamphlets in front of her whenever she plays so her audiences can learn more about the ancient Chinese instrument.

During her interactions with local audiences, Peng realized that many foreign friends cannot distinguish the difference between Chinese culture and other cultures of Asia. "What I'm doing is miniscule but I hope more people can learn about this instrument. I mostly play traditional Chinese pieces that are pentatonic."

Among her repertoire of traditional pieces, she has also performed her own versions of modern songs, including Shanghai Bund, Descendants of the Dragon or soundtracks from films like Shimian Maifu and the online drama Chen Qing Ling.

When she played Hong Yan Jiu from the popular drama Nirvana in Fire, she was stopped by someone in the audience for a chat. "The granny said this song was full of emotions, reminding her of her friends and family too much, to the point that she could not bring herself to leave. She thanked me for bringing such beautiful Chinese music and clothing to them. They have never visited China and rely on their imaginations, but after seeing me perform, they feel like they've been to China themselves," Peng said.

Peng has studied the guzheng since she was 7 years old. She says she practiced for two hours daily, and when she was admitted to the Middle School affiliated with the Wuhan Conservatory of Music for professional training, she practiced nearly eight hours a day.

"If not for this outbreak, I would have been in Spain with my guzheng, playing during a prebooked show. Now I am home day after day." Peng says she received a care package from China with some masks, medication and disinfecting wet tissues. This made her feel proud and safe.

After the fight against COVID-19 is over, Peng says she wants to continue her journey around the globe with her guzheng. "I will continue the street shows, which I have been doing for two years. I will finish my studies in another year, and I hope I can get admitted as a doctoral candidate to carry on my academic work."

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2020-04-17 08:35:00
<![CDATA[Videos on Chinese cuisine popular in Egypt]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/14/content_1478582.htm

Chef Wang Guohua demonstrates the classic Chinese dish stir-fried eggs with tomato for the online cooking workshop Chinese Dining Hall. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An online cooking workshop Chinese Dining Hall, launched on April 9 by the China Culture Center in Cairo and China Radio International, has ignited people's interest and appetite for Chinese dishes.

It will continue to post cooking demonstrations so viewers will be able to watch and learn to cook a variety of Chinese courses, such as black pepper beef.

The first online video received nearly 100 thousand clicks within 24 hours and reached more than 250 thousand audience members. Participation awards are also set for the most popular participants who post their own videos.

According to China Culture Center in Cairo, the workshop will upload new videos on a weekly basis.

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2020-04-14 16:50:00
<![CDATA[Trip.com Group CEO says revival of domestic travel first step to industry recovery]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/14/content_1478578.htm

Jane Sun (R), Trip.com Group CEO, speaks to CGTN Global Business program. [Photo/CGTN]

The travel and tourism industry, one of the global growth engines, is bearing the brunt of the coronavirus pandemic's damage. To revive the industry, recovery of domestic travel businesses should be the first step, Jane Sun, Trip.com Group CEO shared with CGTN.

Trip.com Group is the largest online travel agency in China and one of the largest travel service providers in the world.

According to the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC), the travel and tourism sector accounts for 10 percent of total jobs and GDP globally. That's an estimated 8.8 trillion U.S. dollars annually. And the growth of the industry has been hindered by the pandemic.

Trip.com Group enjoyed surging growth in 2019 but projected a sharp decline of up to 50 percent for its revenue in the first quarter of this year due to the pandemic. "There are tens of millions of cancellations during the Chinese New Year and we would see any travel activity after the holidays," said its latest earnings call.

"In the first quarter, January was very strong, but February and March were almost zero. When we look back, we experienced the darkest moment of the travel industry," Sun recalled.

There are some estimates that the travel and tourism industry won't bounce back from the pandemic until 2023. But Sun expressed her belief in the long-term prospects of tourism.

"In the short term, people will naturally have concerns about safety for travel. But in the long run, the impact of the epidemic on travel will be very small. I'm positive that eventually, the whole world will be able to fall out from this crisis mode, moving to a positive zone," she told CGTN.

Revive the tourism sector methodically

Official data shows that China's tourism sector achieved 6.63 trillion yuan of revenue last year, increasing 11 percent compared to a year before, while domestic tourism totaled 5.72 trillion yuan, up 11.7 percent year on year.

To revive the industry, Sun highlighted the importance of domestic travel rebound by saying "we should do it step by step methodically. We need to recover the domestic travel industry as our first step."

With cities across China getting back to normal, some travel restrictions have been loosened and some tourist attractions have reopened. And given that a couple of holidays, including the Qingming Festival and a four-day May Day Holiday, are coming up, Sun is positive on the rebound of domestic travel in the second quarter, particularly from one-day and suburban tours.

"We've already seen the business volume recovering from zero to something ?People will start to travel within the same city first, and then one-day tour next, and then a short-term tour," she estimated.

And Sun told CGTN that Trip.com has launched a tourism revival V (victory) Plan, contributing over one billion yuan of resources to work with local destinations, travel bureaus, industry partners and other organizations to accelerate recovery in China.

She explained that incentives, such as well-discounted products, may help increase consumers' confidence. "Once customers are in the travel destinations, then the service element is very important," she added.

"You can offer free transportation, get customers from the high speed railway, bring them to the travel destinations and make sure there are no traffic jams ?[You should] make sure the service level is high. Those are very good to impress the consumers so that they can come back again," Sun detailed.

After kick-starting domestic travel in China, she said that the next step is to work with other countries thought to have a handle on the virus, such as Singapore, to discuss easing present travel restrictions.

"As the second step, I think it's important for these countries to work together to encourage the inter-exchange within nations so that we can send customers over there ?Asia probably can kick the lead in among the rest of the world to recover," she mentioned.

"Demand is there and buying power is there, as long as we smartly create a product that is suitable for the consumers, people will be encouraged to travel," Sun said.

(CGTN's Cheng Lei also contributed to the story.)

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2020-04-14 14:39:24
<![CDATA[Bocelli gives solo concert to empty Milan Duomo]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/14/content_1478545.htm

On Easter Sunday, Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli performed a solo concert (photos), titled Music for Hope, from an empty Duomo cathedral in Milan, Italy, streamed live to millions of people around the world amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Accompanied only by the cathedral organist, Emanuele Vianelli, Bocelli sung a chosen selection of pieces, specially arranged for solo voice and organ for the occasion, including the beloved Ave Maria by Bach/Gounod and Amazing Grace, opening completely unaccompanied ?an incredibly poignant moment in a city under continued lockdown, alongside a stirring programme of sacred music for one of the holiest days of the year. The recording was released digitally on audio streaming services within hours.

"I will cherish the emotion of this unprecedented and profound experience, of this Holy Easter which this emergency has made painful, but at the same time even more fruitful, one that will stay among my dearest memories of all time. That feeling of being at the same time alone ?as we all are in the presence of the Most High ?yet of expressing the voice of the prayer of millions of voices, has deeply impressed and moved me. Love is a gift. Making it flow is the primary purpose of life itself. And I find myself once again indebted to life. My gratitude goes to all those who made this possible, the City of Milan and the Duomo, and to all those who accepted the invitation and joined in a planetary embrace, gathering that blessing from Heaven that gives us courage, trust, optimism, in the certainty of our faith," Bocelli said of the event.

The singer, with the Foundation that carries his name, is currently involved in an emergency COVID-19 campaign. The Andrea Bocelli Foundation has started a fundraiser to help hospitals purchase instruments and equipment necessary to protect their medical staff.

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2020-04-14 08:35:56
<![CDATA[Chinese, Israeli singers sing tribute to medical workers]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/13/content_1478530.htm

Gilad Segev (left) and Esther Ha, recorded a song, Be There, paying tribute to medics working throughout the world during the novel coronavirus pandemic..[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

China and Israel encouraged and supported each other in the novel coronavirus outbreak. Gilad Segev, an Israeli singer, was moved by the efforts of the Chinese people, and wrote the song, Be There, and sang it with Esther Ha, a Chinese singer, to pay tribute to the brave medical workers in China and all over the world.

Segev loves Chinese culture and has visited China many times. After witnessing the hard work of the Chinese people, especially the medical workers, he was impressed. He wrote the song, Be There, to pay tribute to the Chinese medical workers and encourage the people of the world to join hands in fighting the epidemic.

"After the outbreak in Israel, Chinese friends sent masks to me and my family. It is the bravery and the friendship of the Chinese people that moved me and inspired me to create the song. I have created this song for the wonderful medical workers in China, Israel and the world, who have contributed themselves to help us in the dark," Segev said.


Gilad Segev (left) and Esther Ha performed at the stage.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

Ha met Segev when performing in Israel 10 years ago and later performed on the same stage several times. This time when Segev invited her to sing the song together, she agreed. Although affected by the epidemic - they could not sing in the same place, or even find a good studio - but they shared the same mind and finally overcame the difficulties and completed the work.

"You can feel Gilad's love for the Chinese people, his compassion for the suffering of this nation, and his positive optimism. As the lyrics say, let's go together and let the sun light up the dark corner. So I think it's of great significance for this song to appear in this period. It uses the dialogue of songs between Israeli musicians and Chinese musicians to express love, " Ha said. "It represents the love and feelings that have never been extinguished between two nations."

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2020-04-13 16:05:24
<![CDATA[Counseling hotline comes to aid of Chinese people in South Korea]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/13/content_1478527.htm

The hotline offers psychological counseling service in Korean and Chinese. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The novel coronavirus epidemic poses threat to people's physical health, and also psychological wellbeing. In early March, the China National Tourism Office in Seoul set up a psychological counseling hotline to ease the strain and fear among South Korea-based Chinese people.

Supported by nine licensed therapists, the hotline offers service during weekdays via cell phone, website (www.hwarin.org), WeChat, and Kakao Talk (a mobile messaging app in South Korea).

It has helped many people in the months-long battle against COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, with the service receiving nearly 200 phone calls, 70 messages on the website, 170 interactions through WeChat and 120 through Kakao Talk.

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2020-04-13 13:14:07
<![CDATA[Mission to redeem]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/10/content_1478463.htm

Blockbusters such as Detective Chinatown 3 are delaying release dates in response to the pandemic. The country's film industry is striving to get back on its feet. The first installment of the Fengshen trilogy is one of the films ready for theatrical release when cinemas reopen.[Photo provided to China Daily]

China's top film authority is working to introduce relief measures to help the domestic industry survive the COVID-19 crisis.

The China Film Administration, the country's top regulator for the sector, released a statement on its official website on April 3, announcing that it has coordinated with the Ministry of Finance, the National Development and Reform Commission, the State Taxation Administration and other related departments to research preferential fiscal and tax policies.

Such policies include exemption from a 5 percent levy on ticket revenues by the National Film Industry Development Special Fund.

Initiated in 1997, the fund was established to support quality film production, urban cinemas' maintenance and renovations, and filming in areas where ethnic groups reside.


Blockbusters such as Detective Chinatown 3 are delaying release dates in response to the pandemic. The country's film industry is striving to get back on its feet. The first installment of the Fengshen trilogy is one of the films ready for theatrical release when cinemas reopen.[Photo provided to China Daily]

The administration also says it will enhance support of the creation and promotion of major films, and provide guidelines to local authorities to help their film companies overcome difficulties.

It is also working to enrich content for internet platforms to meet Chinese demand for watching quality films at home.

Industry players are working hard to prepare for the resumption of operation of the country's more than 12,000 cinemas.

Bona Film Group founder and CEO Yu Dong suggests privately owned companies should not lay off employees, pointing out this is very important for the morale of the entire industry.

The group is one of China's largest privately owned film companies and is known for recruiting Hong Kong veterans to direct Chinese mainland action blockbusters, such as Tsui Hark's The Taking of Tiger Mountain and Dante Lam's Operation Mekong.


Blockbusters such as Detective Chinatown 3 are delaying release dates in response to the pandemic. The country's film industry is striving to get back on its feet. The first installment of the Fengshen trilogy is one of the films ready for theatrical release when cinemas reopen.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"Many companies have been facing cash-flow problems. But I believe it's the duty and responsibility of an enterprise to keep its employees, especially since some of them have strived to fight shoulder to shoulder with you (founders) in the early tough days," Yu said in a recent online meeting organized by the China Film Association.

Yu reveals the company's big-budget war epic, Bingxue Changjinhu (Frozen Chosin), has lost up to 150 million yuan ($21.2 million), mainly because of the suspension of production in Northeast China's Liaoning province.

The film portrays the story of the 17-day Battle of Chosin Reservoir in extremely cold weather on the Korean Peninsula in late 1950 that became a turning point of the Korean War.

Yu says filming was initially planned to start in late January. But the outbreak led to the suspension of filming after the 2,000 cast and crew members had gathered at the shooting sites in Liaoning.

Since the movie is set in winter, filming must be postponed until November.


Rao Shuguang, president, China Film Critic Association. Filmmakers and industry insiders discuss solutions at an online meeting organized by the China Film Association to cope with the huge losses caused by the pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Bona Film has produced several of China's highest-grossing films in 2019, including The Captain and The Bravest. But Yu says it would be a big challenge for the company to "rescue itself" in this special period.

He says he hopes the top film authority will consider exempting all Chinese films from the 5 percent levy for three years.

Song Ge, chairman of Beijing Culture, which is known for runaway hits like Wolf Warrior 2 and The Wandering Earth, says he hopes film companies receive tax relief this year.

He also reveals the company's four upcoming movies, including the first installment of director Wuershan's fantasy Fengshen trilogy and Lu Chuan's adventure film, Bureau 749, are preparing for theatrical release and could be ready when cinemas reopen.


Lu Shaoyang, dean, Peking University School of Journalism and Communication. Filmmakers and industry insiders discuss solutions at an online meeting organized by the China Film Association to cope with the huge losses caused by the pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Xu Tianfu, vice-president of Hengdian Group, which is based in Zhejiang province and owns the country's largest film-and-television shooting base, Hengdian World Studios, says 310 film crews totaling over 5,600 members were forced to suspend studio work during the lockdown, but around 20 crews have resumed shooting.

He reveals the group's over 400 cinemas, which have around 10,000 employees in 31 provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions, are all shut, causing huge losses.

Song predicts the epidemic's impact on the industry may last at least 18 months. He suggests the government reduces taxes and provides subsidies to support films released in the first six months after theaters reopen.

Detective Chinatown 3, the latest installment of director Chen Sicheng's blockbuster Detective Chinatown franchise, led presales among big-budget contenders before the Spring Festival holiday. Around 200 million yuan worth of tickets were sold before the "golden period" for Chinese cinemas. But all new theater releases were halted during the holiday, as the epidemic intensified.


Yu Dong, founder and CEO, Bona Film Group. Filmmakers and industry insiders discuss solutions at an online meeting organized by the China Film Association to cope with the huge losses caused by the pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chen previously told media the film would instead be released during summer vacation or next Spring Festival.

He points out the sector is influential thanks to popular films rather than profits in China and suggests the China Film Association helps filmmakers with promising ideas or projects to get bank loans.

Last year, China produced over 1,000 features, grossing 64.3 billion yuan at the box office. The top 10 films earned nearly 28.6 billion yuan, or 44 percent of total receipts.

Some small and mid-sized film companies had struggled for a long time before the outbreak.

About 3,000 film and television companies went under last year, according to Qcc, a government-recognized enterprise credit rating system.


Chen Sicheng, director. Filmmakers and industry insiders discuss solutions at an online meeting organized by the China Film Association to cope with the huge losses caused by the pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Peking University School of Journalism and Communication dean Lu Shaoyang suggests major studios team up to create digital platforms to emulate the shift that has taken place in the United States before the pandemic.

Lu points out the global media-streaming market reached $44.8 billion last year, surpassing the global box-office gross of $42.2 billion. He suggests Chinese film companies also consider developing productions for streaming sites to reduce risks.

China Film Critic Association president Rao Shuguang estimates that domestic consumption will be different after the epidemic passes in China and that films that are around an hour, which is roughly half the length of silver-screen features, will become more common.

"In such a special period, Chinese filmmakers should not passively wait for support and help," Rao says.

"It's time to self-study to polish skills to create better films."


Song Ge, chairman, Beijing Culture. Filmmakers and industry insiders discuss solutions at an online meeting organized by the China Film Association to cope with the huge losses caused by the pandemic.[Photo provided to China Daily]

 

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2020-04-10 07:34:30
<![CDATA[Migrant birds at Momoge National Nature Reserve in N China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/10/content_1478461.htm

Swans are seen at the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. In recent days, the nature reserve greets its peak season for migrant birds to return to the north. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migrant birds are seen at the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migrant birds fly over the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Swans fly over the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migrant birds fly over the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


White cranes fly over the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Migrant birds fly over the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


White cranes are seen at the wetland in Momoge National Nature Reserve in Zhenlai county, Baicheng city of Northeast China's Jilin province, April 9, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-04-10 09:29:04
<![CDATA[Chinese and Italian opera stars join forces to lift spirits]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/09/content_1478415.htm

While the world is struggling with the coronavirus outbreak, opera singers from China and Italy recorded a song, Together, which will be released on Chinese social media platforms. It is a song that delivers a message of love, hope and healing.

The song, adapted by Chinese composer Ma Jiuyue, is based on two famous songs from China and Italy: Chinese folk song Jasmine Flower and Nessun Dorma (None Shall Sleep), an aria from the final act of Giacomo Puccini's opera Turandot.

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2020-04-09 16:23:19
<![CDATA[Performers use talents to fight pandemic, raise spirits]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/08/content_1478370.htm

It has been more than 80 days since theaters across the nation shut their doors at the end of January. For actors and singers who were born to perform on stage, some may find there is more than enough energy in them waiting to burst out.

After seeing a group of Broadway artists deliver a "cloud performance" of One Day More from the musical Les Misérables, the Chinese counterparts decided to create their own version of a show. Within one week, 23 professionals from more than 10 cities sent clips of SOS and Dancing Queen from Mamma Mia! and compiled them into one video. The actors and singers want to deliver joy and hope through their performances, while expressing their longing to return to the theater and stage.

Many workers in the musical industry are freelancers. With cancellation of shows and theater closings, their work schedule has lessened, but their spirits were high. Many were using this time efficiently to study and create, and some are trying out performing online.

Their work has been shared not just on China's social media but also on YouTube and Instagram, showcasing the proactive attitude and strong spirit of Chinese performers in fighting the pandemic.

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2020-04-08 16:17:55
<![CDATA[Festive China: Qingming]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/05/content_1478237.htm

Qingming is not only one of China's 24 solar terms, but also an occasion for Chinese people to honor lost family members.

The solar term Qingming is observed in early April when the temperature begins to rise and rainfall increases. It is also the right time for spring cultivation and sowing. At the same time, Chinese people will visit tombs of their ancestors around Qingming to pay respect to the deceased. Most families will go to cemeteries with offerings, clean up weeds around the tombs and pray for family prosperity.

Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips focusing on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes, and how they manifest in today's China.

Previous episodes:

Festive China: Spring

Festive China: Spring Festival

Festive China: 24 Solar Terms

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2020-04-05 12:25:31
<![CDATA[Terraced field in Guizhou shows prosperity, beauty]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/01/content_1478084.htm

Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Located deep in the mountains of Congjiang county, Southwest China's Guizhou province, the irrigated terraced fields indicate a good sign for spring farming, on April 1, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-04-01 15:11:59
<![CDATA[Shanghai Museum reopens with extended exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/01/content_1478082.htm

The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/Xinhua]

The Shanghai Museum has been reopened to visitors since March 13. According to the museum's announcement, the special exhibition A Blessing over the Sea: Cultural Relics on Jianzhen and Murals by Higashiyama Kaii from Toshodaiji will extend its duration until April 5.

The exhibition highlights 11 relics from the Tang Dynasty (618-907) and 68 contemporary paintings from the temple's collection, testifying to the long tradition of Sino-Japanese cultural exchanges.

In the Tang Dynasty, Jianzhen, a bonze of the Daming Temple, embarked on an overseas endeavor to introduce Buddhism to Japan. After six agonizing voyages, he succeeded in 753. There, he founded the Toshodaiji Temple, head vihara of Japan's Ritsu Buddhism.


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/Xinhua]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/sipaphoto.com]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/sipaphoto.com]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/sipaphoto.com]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/sipaphoto.com]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/sipaphoto.com]


The exhibition, showcasing the cultural exchange between China and Japan, runs through April 5 at the Shanghai Museum. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-04-01 15:06:46
<![CDATA[In pics: Giant pandas in Shaanxi]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/01/content_1478080.htm

Giant panda "Yuan Yuan" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. In 2019, three giant panda cubs "Jia Jia", "Yuan Yuan" and "Qin Kuer" were born in the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding. The three giant pandas grew up healthily with the care of the staff. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Jia Jia" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A member of staff interacts with giant pandas at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Jia Jia" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Yuan Yuan" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Qin Kuer" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Yuan Yuan" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Jia Jia" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Qin Kuer" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Giant panda "Qin Kuer" plays at the Qinling research center of giant panda breeding in Northwest China's Shaanxi province on March 31, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-04-01 12:36:45
<![CDATA[A modern fairy tale]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-04/01/content_1478059.htm

Children's paintings inspired by Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale, The Bottle Neck, show their wish to contain the novel coronavirus.[Photo provided to China Daily]

The work of Danish author Hans Christian Andersen can inspire people today, be they young or old, says Beijing-based director, Wang Kaihao reports.

As with so many things in life, children can get to the heart of the matter often quicker than adults. So, they call him "Logger Vick" due to this amiable man's bald-headed appearance resembling the leading character in popular Chinese animation Boonie Bears.

Though now based in Beijing with his family, William Yip, a 43-year-old Hong Kong drama director and educator, took more than 200 flights across China in 2019 alone to usher drama into classes, in places ranging from first-tier metropolises to small towns in the west.

Yip describes his busy itinerary as "bittersweet". It's exhausting but worth it. His passion and humor shine through. Drama is like "vitamin C" to Yip: You can survive without it for some time, but it is ultimately essential to sustain health.

This energetic man is meeting a challenge familiar to everyone. Periods of self-quarantine at home due to the outbreak of COVID-19 can plunge people into depression.

"Many children said they are fed up being isolated at home in spite of online courses," Yip recalls. "I want to do something to help them."


A poster design by Guo Xinyao, a 12-year-old participant of the "H.C. Andersen award initiative", explores the bottleneck of life, which is ambivalent to kindness and evil.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In 2018, Yip took his students to Denmark, home of the great fairytale writer Hans Christian Andersen. They presented the drama The Nightingale, adapted from the only China-themed story under Andersen's pen, to local audiences at an arts festival.

He was there again in early February, when the novel coronavirus had not yet become so disruptive in Europe. He discussed with Danish artists how to cheer people up during the crisis and Andersen's name kept cropping up.

"Talking about Andersen, people thought initially that he was just for children as I did years ago," Yip tells China Daily in a telephone interview. "But his stories include a philosophy for life. Adults can also feel connected when they read them."

Cooperating with the Chinese-Danish Cultural Alliance and the Hans Christian Andersen Foundation in Denmark, Yip soon drafted the "H.C. Andersen award initiative" after returning to Beijing.

In the project, which kicked off in late February, Yip uses The Bottle Neck, a lesser-known fairy tale written by Andersen in 1857, as the theme, and asks people to upload their own literary or artistic works inspired by that story. Participants can freely choose their favored genre or format.

Lisa Johansen, co-founder of the Chinese-Danish Cultural Alliance, tells China Daily via email that "our common interest is to share the originality of Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tales and to open up the creativity and imagination of children-and adults, too".

The Bottle Neck follows the story of a wine bottle. It is a tale told by the bottleneck about how it remembers being crafted and filled with quality wine, before being opened during an engagement celebration. It relates how a sailor took the bottle with him on a sea journey and how the ship was wrecked in a storm. The bottle traveled around the world and returned home, with only the bottle's neck intact. An old lady picks it up and she doesn't realize that she drank wine from this bottle at her engagement party.

"The old bottle didn't know her either, partly-in fact, chiefly-because it thought only of itself." The ending of the story, for example, seems to be pertinent for today's world.


Children's paintings inspired by Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale, The Bottle Neck, show their wish to contain the novel coronavirus.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Pause for a cause

As father of a 1-year-old baby, Yip can relate to this story.

"The pandemic has disrupted many people's lives," he says. "But we may be able to settle down and spend more time with our families.` is a good story for us to understand the meaning of life and it leads us to think: When life is no longer usual, what should we do?"

Yip deliberately avoids Andersen's more famous stories like The Emperor's New Clothes, The Ugly Duckling, or The Little Match Girl. He explains that sometimes it is difficult to set the imagination free when the story is too familiar.

Deadline for uploading submissions will be April 2, fittingly, Andersen's birthday. More than 600 pieces have been handed to Yip so far.

The works presented cover various genres-paintings, video clips with dancing, singing and even short dramas, poems and short stories.

Andersen was not only a writer, but also cultivated in drama, drawings, singing and many other genres of art, Johansen says.

"Alongside his work as a writer, he is probably best known for his paper-cuts," Johansen says.

She was pleasantly surprised to see how this project has developed "in such a short time".

"It is so amazing to see the many creative works the Chinese children have sent in," she adds. "It shows that the stories and the values of the fairy tales are just as relevant today as they were 200 years ago."


Yip teaches drama and plays with his students during classes held in Shanghai in 2019.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Many works handed in to the project have combined the bottle story with that of COVID-19, calling for a strong spirit to conquer the pandemic and more caring hearts during the crisis. In children's paintings the team received, some chose to contain the virus in the bottle, some made it into a superhero or a spaceship to fight against the alien-like and villainous virus, and others imagined the bottle as a protective shield for medical workers.

Parodies and sequences of The Bottle Neck keep popping up as well. In a story titled The Towel, written by 11-year-old candidate Liu Zihan, a towel at first envies a mask, which is a newcomer to the family and a rival who always touches the master's face. But "one day, the mask never comes back and no one knows where it has gone".

"Like the four seasons, our life has gains and losses," Qiao Zhongliang, a 32-year-old participant, who sent in a video clip, writes in an attached short paragraph. "When life is experiencing loss, wait for a moment. Everything will revive in the end."

Yip soon found the themes of the work "too abundant to be closely connected with The Bottle Neck". He recounts that a child wrote about a floating cloud that brings rain to thirsty lands. "That echoes our feelings today," Yip says. "Sometimes we're incapable of really helping others (in the outbreak of COVID-19), but we still want to spread hope in a gentle way-like a cloud."

Autistic children are encouraged to join in. Their paintings may not be themed on bottles, but they let their imagination drift through amazing colors and patterns. "Any work is welcome as long as it can be loosely linked with the drifting bottle," Yip says.


Yip teaches drama and plays with his students during classes held in Shanghai in 2019.[Photo provided to China Daily]

More than rewarding

At the end of the project, three winners will be given round-trip tickets from China to Denmark to visit the writer's hometown, but Yip does not see the project as a competition. "It's more like encouragement for creativity," Yip says. "The works by the winners may not be that exquisitely-made, but they will offer a fresh angle."

All of the submissions may have the chance to be exhibited in the future when the outbreak ends, Yip says, adding that "it will be meaningful for us to look back upon our life in the days of the crisis".

They are already being "exhibited" in digital form on Yip's official public WeChat account.

"It's hard to compare different art genres, but people can view all the works on this open platform and have their own opinions," he says, adding that a judging group comprising 15 leaders from the education sector and different fine art genres were invited to choose the winners.

Qian Zhilong, a veteran independent researcher on education, is one of them. He places priority on "reflection of true emotions". Qian believes that the Andersen award project will have a lasting legacy for Chinese children.

"Andersen was mediocre at school, but his achievements finally attracted worldwide attention due to the power of dreams," Qian says. "In today's schools, children are still faced with a ubiquitous judging system that is based on test papers, which often nips in the bud children's power to dream."

Qian says he hopes that by participating in this program, people will be more inspired after they learn more about Andersen's own story.

The judge also says that the pandemic has given society a chance to re-evaluate the current education system, when the pause button of this "assembly line" is finally pushed after becoming overheated.


William Yip, 43, a Beijing-based Hong Kong drama director and educator, takes part in an arts festival held in Hjorring, Denmark, in 2019, mixing with his students and international friends.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"Our pedagogies and goals of education will be reformed, replaced or will evolve into new ones," he says. "The epidemic gives us time to think what we've done right and what was done wrong. It may enable an earlier evolution."

And the changing situation of COVID-19 attaches a greater global significance to the project.

"When the idea was started in February, the purpose was to encourage Chinese children and families during a difficult time," says Johansen from the Chinese-Danish Cultural Alliance. "Now just one month later we are in the same situation in Denmark and Europe.

"The world is connected," she says. "We need each other?in order to strengthen solidarity and community. In situations like this, art offers hope and deepens understanding. It brings us closer together, both as families and countries. It's an eye-opener of what is important in life."

As Andersen once said: "Life itself is the most wonderful fairy tale."

Yip likes saying that drama is not restricted to stage, when he brings it to schools.

"Fine art is not only concerned about the final results," he says. "Just like in this art project, we self-examine when we are playing. Play is empowerment."

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2020-04-01 08:29:09
<![CDATA[Health packages warm hearts of Chinese students in Bangladesh]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/31/content_1478016.htm

Chinese students in Bangladesh pose for a photo before the health packages sent from the Chinese embassy to Bangladesh, March 28, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Twenty-three Chinese students in Chittagong, a coastal city in southeastern Bangladesh, received health packages from the Chinese embassy to Bangladesh on March 28.

The packages included masks, hand soap, food and a letter from cultural counselor Sun Yan and his colleagues from the embassy's cultural department.

Sun expressed the Chinese government's concern for the health and safety of Chinese students in the letter. He also advised the students to take care of themselves and stay calm facing COVID-19.

The students were deeply moved by the packages and expressed their thanks to the embassy in a letter. They said their worries and confusion gave them a lot of pressure as they were far from their home and families. Yet the help and concern from the embassy greatly comforted them.


Chinese students in Bangladesh hold the health packages sent from the Chinese embassy to Bangladesh, March 28, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-31 11:15:48
<![CDATA[Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/31/content_1478015.htm

The Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students who are studying in the country, March 25, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On March 25, the Chinese embassy to Pakistan sent health packages to Chinese students who are studying in the country.

Yao Jing, Chinese ambassador to Pakistan, Pang Chunxue, minister of the embassy, Zhang Heqing, director of the China Cultural Center in Pakistan and student representatives attended the ceremony.

Yao said Chinese students and workers need to enhance self-protection facing the rapid growth of COVID-19 in Pakistan. He suggested they keep in contact with their families and have more communication with people in China.

According to Yao, China will be fully committed to help Pakistan to fight the epidemic. Chinese doctors and medical supplies are arriving to Pakistan in succession, with more continued assistance from China.


The Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students who are studying in the country, March 25, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The Chinese embassy to Pakistan sends health packages to Chinese students who are studying in the country, March 25, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-31 11:02:14
<![CDATA[UK city of music silenced by COVID-19 in worst crisis since WWII]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/30/content_1477918.htm

[Photo/sipaphoto.com]

As a UNESCO City of Music the beat notches up a few octaves during a typical weekend when thousands of people converge on Liverpool. But recently the normally crowded Cavern Quarter, centered around the iconic club where the Beatles rose to fame, has remained silent.

Birthplace of the rock band the Beatles in the 1960s, music remains the heartbeat of this northern English city. Normally crowded bars which in pre-coronavirus days were a magnet for tens of thousands of revellers and music lovers from across the city and across the world, are deserted.

The turntables are not spinning, look-alike Beatles impersonators have no stage on which to perform, the statue of the late Beatles member John Lennon, looks like a lonely figure in Mathew Street.

The main downtown area, known as Liverpool One, is in sleep mode with the department stores, fashion shops and restaurants put on hold by command of the British government.

Liverpool, says Mayor Joe Anderson, is a city in crisis due to the virus, adding: "the number of our people with the virus is increasing dramatically."

Almost 80 years after the World War II, coronavirus has brought out a community spirit in Liverpool rarely seen since those dark days of the Blitz.

Communities are working day and night to keep people who are trapped in their homes fed with food as well as emotional support. A food parcel is as welcome as a cheerful hello from thousands of friends and neighbors who have formed a "people's army" to help the needy.

Anderson has organised the so-called "people's army", and so far thousands have volunteered to help with tasks ranging from shopping, delivering food, or just to check on people who live alone. The mayor has also arranged for homeless people, many of them sleeping rough in shop doorways, to be moved into hotels to help protect them from the invisible enemy.

"We are continuing to support each other in Liverpool," said Anderson who has set up a command center in his home, away from the iconic Cunard Building, the waterfront home of City Hall.

Anderson said the city is taking a painful hit to its economy because of the virus.

"Tourism employs 38,000 people in Liverpool and is worth 3.3 billion pounds to the city economy every year. The hospitality section, which includes hotels that provide 10,000 rooms has so far lost half of its 30 million pounds a week income," he told Xinhua.

Hotel rooms in Liverpool are like gold dust when either of the two big Premier League clubs, Liverpool and city rivals Everton, have home matches. With the football season on hold, rooms booked months ago are no longer needed.

Cruise ships that would have sailed up the River Mersey to Liverpool's famous UNESCO World Heritage Site waterfront will not be calling this year. Each of the floating palaces that ties up at Liverpool Pier Head is worth a million pounds (about $1.25 million) to the local economy.

The losses caused by COVID-19 pile on the agony for Anderson, a staunch Labour politician, grappling with an austerity-fuelled attack on the city coffers since the financial crisis over a decade ago.

"Cuts to our support grant by the national government over the last 10 years have left us around 440 million pounds worse off," said Anderson.

"Fortunately, Liverpool is a city that has always pulled together. We have faced a number of difficult periods over the last few decades, and always come through," he said.

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2020-03-30 09:25:00
<![CDATA[China's TV drama industry begins to resume operation]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/30/content_1477917.htm

A still image of the hit TV drama  I Will Find You a Better Home. [Photo/Mtime]

China's TV drama industry, which has been dormant for months due to the COVID-19 outbreak, is resuming work and production in an orderly manner, according to the National Radio and Television Administration Friday.

Major film and television program production centers in Xiangshan and Hengdian have reopened their studios. More than 90 percent of 42 major film and television enterprises in East China's Jiangsu province have resumed work on a limited scale.

Meanwhile, about 50 percent of Shanghai's film and television companies have returned to work, but have barely resumed filming. And over 90 percent of the 155 members of the Capital Radio & TV Program Producers Association in Beijing have gone back to work.

The administration will support the creation of TV series with themes of the country's fight against COVID-19 and poverty reduction this year, it said in a statement.

The administration issued a circular to promote production resumption of the TV drama industry earlier this month, detailing 12 measures such as funds support, developing online services, key projects support and adjusting the schedule of exhibitions and festivals.

In addition, a video conference held by the administration recently has discussed the production of several TV series on topics ranging from the epidemic fight, poverty alleviation, the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party of China to the Belt and Road Initiative.

Local agencies around the country have introduced measures on work resumption as well, the administration said, adding that provincial-level regions including Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Beijing and Shanghai have specified plans to facilitate TV series creation on major themes.

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2020-03-30 09:15:00
<![CDATA[Exhibition showcases Chinese people’s battle against epidemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/30/content_1477922.htm

The poster of the online exhibition featuring Chinese people’s fight against COVID-19. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Recently, the China Cultural Center in Seoul launched an online photo exhibition featuring the cooperation between China and other countries on the fight against COVID-19.

The images capture how Chinese people bravely faced the COVID-19 and their perseverance in the difficult period.

The event aims to express the idea that only through cooperation can different nations conquer the epidemic.

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2020-03-30 10:02:44
<![CDATA[Online travel to Xinjiang’s Kuqa opens]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/26/content_1477794.htm

An online photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched by the China Cultural Center in Seoul on March 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Organized by the China Cultural Center in Seoul, a photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched on the internet on Thursday. Seventy pictures, capturing the grand landscape and historical heritages of Kuqa, are on display for the local people.

Kuqa, once called Kizil in ancient times, was the cradle of the world famous Kizil culture. As a bridge between Asia and Europe, it served as a political, economic, military, cultural and commercial center on the ancient Silk Road. Kuqa was also deemed a "Western Music Capital" as early as the Han (206 BC-AD220) and Tang (618-907) dynasties for its representative Western style of music and dance.

An online photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched by the China Cultural Center in Seoul on March 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The splendid natural wonders in Kuqa were beautifully captured by photographers, such as the Tianshan Mysterious Grand Canyon and populous euphratica forest. Pictures featuring cultural heritages recommended by Lonely Planet, including Kizil Thousand Buddha Caves and Kuqa's Great Mosque, are also available.

The event is part of "Online Travel in China", a series of exhibitions designed by the center for people unable to visit exhibitions due to COVID-19.

More online shows about Chinese papercutting, Chinese Lunar New Year and Peking Opera will open soon.


An online photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched by the China Cultural Center in Seoul on March 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched by the China Cultural Center in Seoul on March 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


An online photo exhibition featuring Kuqa county in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region was launched by the China Cultural Center in Seoul on March 26, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-26 10:56:06
<![CDATA[Xiabu making industries in Chongqing resume production]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/25/content_1477782.htm

A technician makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. Rongchang Grass linen is a traditional Chinese handicraft with a rich history. It is a kind of cloth made of ramie purely by hand, and famous for its soft, thin, flat texture and fine quality. Because this cloth usually keeps the body cool in the hot summer, it is also named Xiabu (literally meaning summer cloth). With comprehensive epidemic prevention measures, Xiabu making industries here have resumed production. [Photo/Xinhua]


A technician makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A woman makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A woman makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A woman makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Customers select products of Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a store in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A woman makes Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A customer views a folding fan made with Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a store in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Women make Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Inheritor Yan Xianying (left) demonstrates as two learners observe to make Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a workshop in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Customers select products of Rongchang Grass Linen, also called Rongchang Xiabu, at a store in Rongchang district of Chongqing, Southwest China, March 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-25 12:41:10
<![CDATA[Chinese and Austrian female artists exhibit their stories]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/25/content_1477733.htm

By Bronwyn Bancroft. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

An exhibition featuring Chinese and Australian female artists was scheduled to open to the public on March 23. But due to the continued rise of Covid-19 cases in Australia, the organizer, China Cultural Center in Sydney, will put the show on the internet for the convenience of visitors.

Curated by Austria’s well-known art critic Nicholas Tsoutas and Chinese artist Li Hong, the exhibition will display about 20 contemporary pieces, including paintings and sculptures, from six artists.


By Bronwyn Bancroft.[Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

Xiao Xiayong, director of the China Cultural Center in Sydney, said the works from six female artists would let people feel the interpretation of art in different cultures and their mutual respect and communication. The event aims to let Australians know more about female artists coming from diverse cultural backgrounds and provide a platform for cooperation between Chinese and Australian artists.

Tsoutas said the exhibit shows the gender difference and its impact on art creation in an increasingly complex society from the perspective of females. Visitors can get new ways of communication in the world from various points of view at the exhibition which also highlights female’s importance and equal status in the development of contemporary arts.


By Li Hong. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

“These artists tell the stories from the heart with their own style,?said Li, who expected the show will encourage people to fight against the epidemic together.

There will be access to the exhibition on the center’s official website, Facebook, Instagram and official accounts on other social media.


By Lindy Lee. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


By Nike Savvas. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


By Wang Lan.[Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


By Wang Lan. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


By Eugenia Raskopoulos. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


The China Cultural Center in Sydney. [Photo by Xiao Xiayong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-25 10:26:01
<![CDATA[Blooming spring flowers add delight to Anhui]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/20/content_1477578.htm

Blooming spring flowers in Hefei, Anhui province, are utterly delightful! The pink begonias growing across Yaohai district have made the area even more attractive. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Blooming spring flowers in Hefei, Anhui province, are utterly delightful! The pink begonias growing across Yaohai district have made the area even more attractive. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Blooming spring flowers in Hefei, Anhui province, are utterly delightful! The pink begonias growing across Yaohai district have made the area even more attractive. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Blooming spring flowers in Hefei, Anhui province, are utterly delightful! The pink begonias growing across Yaohai district have made the area even more attractive. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Blooming spring flowers in Hefei, Anhui province, are utterly delightful! The pink begonias growing across Yaohai district have made the area even more attractive. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-03-20 16:46:08
<![CDATA[Spring tea harvest in village in Hunan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/20/content_1477576.htm

The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]


The tea harvest season has arrived around the Spring Equinox. In Jishou, Xiangxi Tu and Miao autonomous prefecture of Central China's Hunan province, tea growers pick fresh tea leaves from the garden, on March 19, 2020. [Photo by Liu Zhenjun/For chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-03-20 15:54:45
<![CDATA[Festive China: Spring Equinox]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/20/content_1477501.htm

There is a Chinese saying that goes, "The whole year's work depends on a good start in spring." As China has long been an agricultural country, for Chinese people spring means the beginning of a whole year's farming.

Start of Spring is the first of the 24 solar terms, which is considered the beginning of spring. As the weather warms up, spring awakens the earth, the rain falls, the thunder surges, and everything in the world wakes up from winter.

Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips that focus on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes, and how they are manifested in today's China.

Previous episodes:

Festive China: Spring Festival

Festive China: 24 Solar Terms

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2020-03-20 09:10:09
<![CDATA[Online Arts and Culture]]> https://www.chinadaily.com.cn/culture/onlineartsandculture

 

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2020-03-19 16:54:02
<![CDATA[Jin Opera performers move stage to live streaming platform]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/18/content_1477445.htm

Wu Lingyun live streams a rehearsal of Jin Opera art in Taiyuan, North China's Shanxi province, March 9, 2020. Due to the epidemic risks of COVID-19, theater performances are suspended. Wu Lingyun moves his stage of Jin Opera to live streaming platform with his parents and his wife, who are all famous performers of Jin Opera. Jin opera is a traditional art form originated in Shanxi province during the early years of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), featured for its energetic singing style. [Photo/Xinhua]


Wang Chunmei, Wu Lingyun's wife, performs Jin Opera through live stream. [Photo/Xinhua]


Wu Zhong, center, Wu Lingyun's father, listens to Wu Lingyun's performance. [Photo/Xinhua]


Wu Lingyun is seen during a live streamed rehearsal of Jin Opera at the research center of Jin Opera art. [Photo/Xinhua]


Wu Lingyun (first right) and his family greet the audience through live stream. [Photo/Xinhua]


Wu Lingyun and his wife Wang Chunmei perform Jin Opera through live stream. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-18 13:10:00
<![CDATA[School opens online classes on cultural heritage]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/18/content_1477443.htm

A teacher livestreams leather carving techniques used in shadow puppetry, in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, on March 15, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Who ever said that heritage is boring? In a world imbued with technology and digital gadgets, traditional Chinese culture has found a way to recapture the imagination of China's youngsters in online classrooms.

Most Chinese schools, after the novel coronavirus breakout, turned to internet platforms to continue the new semester this spring. Teachers communicate with students through smart phones and livestream software.

Zhongshan Middle School in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, recently opened a series of culture courses, teaching students about traditional cultural heritage,such as shadow puppetry and paper-cutting.


Gao Hanyu, a fifth grader, learns to carve a shadow puppet through online classes at home in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, on March 15, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A teacher plays folk songs that are performed during a shadow puppet show on a traditional music instrument, in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, on March 15, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A teacher livestreams leather carving techniques used in shadow puppetry, in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, on March 15, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A teacher sings folk songs that are performed during a shadow puppet show in Luanzhou, North China's Hebei province, on March 15, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-18 11:30:00
<![CDATA[8 museums in Shenyang reopens to public with prevention measures]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/18/content_1477441.htm

People receive temperature checking before entering the Shenyang Palace Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit Marshal Zhang's Mansion Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shenyang Palace Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


A visitor poses for photos at the Shenyang Palace Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the 9.18 Historical Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People receive temperature checking before entering the 9.18 Historical Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shenyang Palace Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit Marshal Zhang's Mansion Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People receive temperature checking before entering the Marshal Zhang's Mansion Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the 9.18 Historical Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People register before entering the 9.18 Historical Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People register before entering the 9.18 Historical Museum in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, March 17, 2020. Eight museums in Shenyang reopened to the public on Tuesday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-18 10:55:51
<![CDATA[Rare footage of wild animals in SW China nature reserves]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/18/content_1477429.htm

The number of endangered wildlife in China is steadily rising. Enjoy some rare footage of these wild animals in Southwest China's Sichuan province. Can you recognize any?

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2020-03-18 13:05:00
<![CDATA[Italy finds sanctuary in music amid epidemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/18/content_1477425.htm

Music is flowing through the air in alleyways, rooftops and verandahs. Elegant notes played by pianos, trumpets and violins are filling in the void on empty streets. If no musical instruments are at hand, people join in as "percussionists" by clanging with their pots and pans.

This is not the scene at a concert hall. This is on the streets of Italy amid the epidemic.

The COVID-19 outbreak has sparked one of the most severe forms of a national crisis for many of the affected countries around the world. At the same time, it has also showcased the spirit and inner strength of many nations.

An artist sings from her balcony in Rome, Italy on March 14. [Photo/Xinhua]

As Italy carries forward with a national lockdown, Italian residents took to their balconies to perform the national anthem in a "flash mob" style as a way to express gratitude for the medical workers on the front line of the fight against COVID-19. Fratelli d'Italia, which in itself is a work about resisting oppression, calling for unity and fighting together, is now the country's declaration of war against the coronavirus, as families sang along and cheered to raise morale, show solidarity and enjoy a moment of respite in this tough time.

A YouTube video of Italians playing the Chinese national anthem in Rome to thank China for its aid has received more than 50,000 views.

The Italian man who played the Chinese national anthem said to the speakers: "I am not sure if there is a Chinese neighbor here. But I would like to sincerely thank China," according to CGTN.

Maurizio Marchini sings in Florence. [Photo/Facebook account of Maurizio Marchini]

Quarantined tenor Maurizio Marchini joined the game and serenaded the empty streets of Florence with his rendition of Giacomo Puccini's aria Nessun Dorma. His performance has since been viewed more than 4 million times on Twitter and nearly 3 million times on Facebook.

Another video widely shared on social media showed quarantined Italians singing a traditional song, Canto della Verbena.

Premier violinist Aldo Cicchini of Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della RAI performed Manha de Carnaval on his balcony, which attracted many people from the neighborhood to come out on their own balconies to appreciate it.

In the capital of Rome, a neighborhood collectively sang Volare, an old tune from the 1950s, to boost the spirit of the united.

Residents participate in a "balcony concert" in Italy. [Photo/Sina Weibo]

Italy, known for its rich history of art and culture, has found sanctuary and asylum in music, rediscovering peace and happiness in this difficult time. This optimistic gesture was captured in videos, which encouraged the world, including netizens in China, who were amazed at how artistic the country can be.

"How romantic the Italians are!"

"Italy has proved itself once again as the land of the Renaissance. Art and culture are inscribed in their genes!"

"Give it another month, we will witness the second Renaissance!"

"Art is not the answer to disasters, but its powers are boundless."

China has shown support to Italy's fight on the battleground.

East China's Zhejiang province sent a team of 12 medical professionals to Italy on March 17, along with 9 tons of medical supplies, 10,000 nucleic acid detection reagents and 50,000 antibody test kits. To date, Zhejiang province has donated 35.4 tons of goods and materials to Italy.

Qiu Yunqing, executive vice-president of The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, said he wanted to show Italy how to avoid unnecessary divergence in the fight against the epidemic.

"Overall, we wanted them to have more confidence in this battle," Qiu added.

The support and love of art is reflected in other actions China has taken. In Jack Ma's donation of medical supplies to Italy, the musical score and a line of lyrics taken from Nessun Dorma was written on a poster posted on the package.

Lyrics from Nessun Dorma are posted on the package of Jack Ma's donation of medical supplies to Italy. "Vanish, o night! At dawn, I will win!" The lyrics read. [Photo/Weibo account of Alibaba]

To date, Italy has 31,506 confirmed cases of COVID-19 infections. Italy has imposed an unprecedented lockdown across all of Italy in an effort to slow down the outbreak of COVID-19. Sights of the hustle and bustle of the streets are nowhere to be seen, but optimism and love for arts are still there.

Video source: Sina Weibo

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2020-03-18 10:19:45
<![CDATA[Chinese performances shine at New Zealand festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/17/content_1477375.htm

New Zealand children perform Maori songs and dances.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

The Newtown Festival, first held 24 years ago, was held in Wellington, New Zealand on March 8. Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister of New Zealand, showed up at the market in the morning to interact with the public. The China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited to participate in the performance and deliver programs. The activity covered 11 blocks, and according to the statistics of the organizers, about 80,000 people participated this year.

The performances by the China Cultural Center in Wellington were warmly welcomed by the audience. Artistic programs included Chinese classical dance, mechanical dance, and flute and erhu solos.

Jenny, a resident of Wellington, says she has been to China many times and has always been fond of the bamboo flute. The sound of the flute made her feel like she was back in China, but she says the melody is also familiar to local people.


New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern (left) interacts with people attending the fair.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

Katherine, a resident of Upper Hart, drives every year with her family to attend the fair. Seeing the Chinese artistic performances, she was very happy to say, "Both of my two children are learning Chinese. I hope that they can learn more about Chinese culture, which will be very helpful for learning languages."

Michael, who is over 70 years old, said that Chinese performances reminded him of the pandemic that has become widespread worldwide. He wishes that all patients could overcome the disease and get better as soon as possible.


Bamboo flute solo. [Photo/Chinaculture.org]

The organizers said that due to the outbreak, they strictly followed the Department of Health of New Zealand's recommendations and prepared enough hand sanitizer and relevant reminders for the general public while holding the event. It is hoped that all participants can enjoy the summer sunshine, art, food, culture and more in the activities while also preventing the epidemic.

As the annual and largest nonprofit public celebration in Wellington, the Newtown Festival is a landmark activity of multicultural and community culture. After being invited to this event last year, the China Cultural Center in Wellington has been integrated into it again this year, which will give New Zealanders more opportunity to experience and understand Chinese culture.


Chinese classical dance performance. [Photo/Chinaculture.org]


The New Zealand Capital Cultural Group participates in the fair performances.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


New Zealand children perform Maori songs and dances.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


The New Zealand Capital Cultural Group participates in the fair performances.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


New Zealand children perform Maori songs and dances.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


A Chinese erhu solo by the China Cultural Center.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]


People enjoy the fair.[Photo/Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-17 13:01:01
<![CDATA[Sichuan panda says hello to you]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/17/content_1477364.htm

The universally beloved panda is a poster animal in Sichuan province, and also a famous brand for local tourism.

However, the home province of the adorable creature has many other attractions, as its slogan reminds us: “Sichuan, more than just pandas?

Now, the province is promoting a series of special programs to give visitors a more fulfilling travel experience, highlighting the local cuisine, intangible cultural heritage, and natural scenery and winter sports in Sichuan.

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2020-03-17 10:45:53
<![CDATA[Shanghai Natural History Museum reopens with coronavirus prevention measures]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/16/content_1477317.htm

People visit the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


A child visits the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the Shanghai Natural History Museum in East China's Shanghai, March 13, 2020. The Shanghai Natural History Museum reopened to the public from Friday with measures taken to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-03-16 08:44:17
<![CDATA[Xi’an Symphony Orchestra schedules online concert]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/16/content_1477315.htm

Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

When there is a will, there is a way.

Though many performances and music concerts have been canceled due to the novel coronavirus, musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra are preparing to livestream their music on March 27.

The online concert will feature string quartet, piano duet and percussion quartet.


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians from Xi’an Symphony Orchestra rehearse for an online concert on March 27 at the Xi’an Concert Hall, Shaanxi province, March 13, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-16 10:53:27
<![CDATA[Spring scenery along section of Yangtze River in Hubei]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/16/content_1477313.htm

Photo taken on March 14, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River at Xiling Gorge in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 15, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 15, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 14, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River at Xiling Gorge in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province.[Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 14, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River at Xiling Gorge in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province.. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 15, 2020 shows peach blossoms at the Three Gorges Dam in Central China's Hubei province.. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 14, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River at Xiling Gorge in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 14, 2020 shows scenery along the section of Yangtze River at Xiling Gorge in Zigui county, Central China's Hubei province. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-16 09:24:29
<![CDATA[Scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, SW China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/14/content_1477311.htm

Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on March 12, 2020 shows the scenery of cherry blossoms in Guian New District, Southwest China's Guizhou province. [photo/Xinhua]

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2020-03-14 14:15:15
<![CDATA[Houston Rodeo cancelled over COVID concerns]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/13/content_1477247.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Organizers of the 2020 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo announced Wednesday they would shut down the rest of this year's events out of concern for public health, according to instructions issued by the City of Houston and the Houston Health Department.

Though sad over the cancellation, organizers said tourists' health and safety is the top priority and the decision made by the local government was a precautionary measure to prevent people from contracting the virus.

The cancellation could result in economic losses worth up to tens of millions of dollars, Houston Chronicle reports. The 2019 Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo generated a total economic impact of $227 million and supported nearly 3,700 jobs, according to the Rodeo's 2019 Economic Impact Study.

The Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo has been an annual event since 1932, attracting about two million visitors each year from around the world. This year's festival opened on March 3 and was slated to run through March 22.

A CNN report reveals as of Wednesday, more than 1,200 COVID-19 cases had been confirmed in the US, giving rise to a large number of cancelled events across the country.

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2020-03-13 13:30:00
<![CDATA[Eggshell carving in Guangzhou]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/13/content_1477215.htm

You'd be walking on eggshells too if you had to carve an intricate design on it.

Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-03-13 09:53:25
<![CDATA[Flowers and trees add colors to spring]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/12/content_1477202.htm

Flowers and trees are breathing new life into spring at Yantai, Shandong province, as weather warms up. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Flowers and trees are breathing new life into spring at Yantai, Shandong province, as weather warms up. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Flowers and trees are breathing new life into spring at Yantai, Shandong province, as weather warms up. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Flowers and trees are breathing new life into spring at Yantai, Shandong province, as weather warms up. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Flowers and trees are breathing new life into spring at Yantai, Shandong province, as weather warms up. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-03-12 15:44:14
<![CDATA[China Cultural Center in Seoul holds online activities amid epidemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/12/content_1477178.htm

The website page designed by the China Cultural Center in Seoul shows the bilateral effort amid the novel coronavirus epidemic. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

In the face of novel coronavirus outbreak, China and South Korea reiterated firm support and friendship between governments, social organizations and people.

The China Cultural Center in Seoul organized a series of online educational and cultural activities. Meanwhile, a special online video and photo exhibition, displaying the close cooperation between the two countries, has been launched. Together, China and South Korea will witness the victory of the COVID-19 fight.

Photos and bilingual reports by the China Cultural Center in Seoul amid the novel coronavirus epidemic. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-12 14:09:19
<![CDATA[Nangang dace hotpot in Guangzhou]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/12/content_1477149.htm

Hotpots are popular during winter. And in Nangang, it’s all about the dace.

Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-03-12 10:22:29
<![CDATA[Scientists discover smallest dinosaur of all time]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/12/content_1477137.htm

An international team of scientists recently discovered the skull of a tiny bird preserved in 100 million-year-old Myanmar amber dating to the Cretaceous period, according to a paper newly published in renowned scientific journal Nature.

The 14-millimeter-long skull is smaller than that of a bee hummingbird, the smallest living bird, making the new species, Oculudentavis khaungraae, the smallest bird ?and thus dinosaur ?ever found.

When Xing Lida, a paleontologist at the China University of Geosciences, who led the research, first saw the amber in 2016, he was amazed.

"It's awesome. It's like a tiny arrow with a long beak and big eyes. Too strange. Only birds have such characteristics," he said.

"But it had too many teeth, much more than the common early Cretaceous birds," he said.

A bird-like dinosaur is clearly seen in the amber in which paleontologists found the new species, Oculudentavis khaungraae, the smallest dinosaur of all time. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The well-preserved fossil skull has rows of nearly 100 teeth that extend all the way under its big eyes that are supported by scleral rings (eye bones) of a unique structure. The unusually high number of teeth and the unique shape of the eye make it difficult for paleontologists to classify the specimen, nicknamed Teenie Weenie.

Scientists speculate that about 100 million years ago this bird-like animal lived in the tropical humid Hukawng Valley in northern Myanmar, where the amber was mined, and was unfortunately trapped by globs of resin that dropped from trees, leaving it exquisitely preserved in the amber through millions of years.

The most interesting thing about the specimen is its unusually small size, Xing said.

Paleontologists note that animals that become very small have to deal with new problems, like how to adjust all sensory organs in a very small head or how to maintain body heat. They call this process miniaturization, which commonly occurs in isolated environments like islands. During miniaturization, animals normally have lost teeth and enlarged eyes.

Image reconstruction of the living environment of Oculudentavis khaungraae shows it in the Hukawng Valley in northern Myanmar 100 million years ago. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Despite its small size, the specimen, Oculudentavis, has more teeth than any other fossilized bird. Its tooth row is also longer than that of other birds, extending all the way under the eye. The large number of teeth indicates that Oculudentavis was a predator, the paper said.

"Judging from its size, it might prey mainly on insects," Xing said.

Another odd thing is its eye, which is 4 mm in diameter. Birds are known to have a ring of bones that help support the eye. In most birds, the bones in the ring are simple and fairly square, but in Oculudentavis they are spoon-shaped, a morphology previously found only in some living lizards, which is one of the most confusing features paleontologists find in this specimen, the paper said.

The eye bones would have formed a cone, like those in owls, suggesting keen visual abilities. However, unlike owls, whose eyes face forward, Oculudentavis's eyes would have faced sideways, the paper said. The jugal, or cheekbone, is bowed in such a way that suggests Oculudentavis's eyes would have bulged out of its head sideways.

No living animal utilizes such a type of visual system so it is hard to understand how the eyes of Oculudentavis may have functioned. However, the small aperture of the eye bones (the inner diameter of the ring) indicates that Oculudentavis was active during the day.

Due to its unique structure of eye and tooth, paleontologists regard it as a new species and give it the name Oculudentavis, or eye-tooth-bird, "a dry scientific name referring to the teeth that extend under the eye", said Jingmai K O'Connor with Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, lead paleontologist on the research.

Because the fossil consists of only a skull, it is still unclear how to relate it with other birds.

"We think it's a bird. The skull has a shape that only occurs in birds and some dinosaurs. However, there are no specific skull morphological characters that define birds, therefore it could be a dinosaur or even something else," O'Connor said.

Xing added, "In fact, it has some characteristics that do not belong to birds or even dinosaurs. At present we think of it as a bird or a dinosaur, which is the most likely conclusion based on the characteristics of the skull."

"To us, the paleontologists, birds are dinosaurs. This specimen may represent the lowest limit of body size that dinosaurs could reach during the dinosaur age," he said.

The image of the skull of the Oculudentavis khaungraae is reconstructed with computed tomography techniques. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Analyses that explore the relationship between Oculudentavis and other fossil birds suggest that the tiny bird is very primitive, placed between Archaeopteryx, the oldest and most primitive bird, and Jeholornis, a long boney-tailed bird from the Early Cretaceous of China. As a result, like these two groups, Oculudentavis was very likely to have a long tail, like that in non-avian dinosaurs.

The full name of the bird is Oculudentavis khaungraae in homage to the collector who found it, Khaung Ra. Now the amber is kept in a private museum.

One of the biggest advantages of amber lies in its high quality preservation of the fine details in the skull, such as the bony rings that support the eyes, and soft tissue features that have not been preserved in other specimens, such as small bumps on the roof of the mouth that aided in gripping prey, said Ryan C McKellar, curator of Invertebrate Paleontology at the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Regina, Canada, in an email to China Daily. McKellar helped with the interpretation of how the specimen was preserved in amber in the research.

"Amber gives us almost the only opportunity, to learn about tiny vertebrates from the dinosaur age. We were lucky to find non-avian dinosaurs and birds in these tiny vertebrates' records. Oculusdentavis is by far the smallest and most important specimen," Xing said.

McKellar said, "The specimen is important because it represents a size class that we have probably been overlooking in other fossil deposits, simply because the animals are too small to preserve as identifiable fossils."

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2020-03-12 00:00:00
<![CDATA[Italian culture minister praises Chinese artists' support]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/11/content_1477078.htm

The novel coronavirus has posed a challenge for countries around the world. Italy began a nationwide lockdown on Tuesday of 60 million people to contain the epidemic, as the number of cases elsewhere in Europe and the US increases.

Recently, Chinese tenor Mario Del Zhang, together with 14 Chinese vocal artists who have studied in Italy, performed the classic Nessun Dorma from the opera Turandot, to evoke confidence and hope for the future.

Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini posted the video on his Facebook page. "Thanks to these beautiful Chinese young people. The video moves and sends us a very strong message of hope," he commented.

The year 2020 marks the China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism. As the current situation evolves, partners from both nations adjust plans to cope with the COVID-19 fight.

Beijing Design Week launched the initiative From Plan A to Plan @ to facilitate online exchange in the design industry. Within a week, it has gathered nearly a hundred endorsements from prestigious Italian designers, politicians and business figures.

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2020-03-11 13:57:12
<![CDATA[Handmade copperwares in Guangzhou]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/11/content_1477047.htm

Copperwares vanished from households in Guangzhou and were replaced by stainless steel products. But this man is trying to bring back copper in a different way.


Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-03-11 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Freshwater pearl workshop in Guangzhou]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/10/content_1476967.htm

Freshwater pearls are mainly cultivated in eastern China. And this workshop has brought that experience to Guangzhou's pearl lovers.


Be sure to subscribe to the China Daily Originals newsletter at https://bit.ly/2D9w6DV.

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2020-03-10 09:52:29
<![CDATA[Chinese version of 'Reflection' released for upcoming 'Mulan']]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/09/content_1476895.htm

Actress Liu Yifei, who plays the female protagonist in Disney's upcoming live-action remake of "Mulan", has lend her voice to the Chinese version of the title song "Reflection", originally performed by Christina Aguilera for the 1998 animated film of the same name.

Video provided by Disney.

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2020-03-09 12:51:08
<![CDATA[China, Tanzania deepen ties in library development]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/09/content_1476907.htm

Wang Siping, cultural counselor of Chinese embassy in Tanzania and director of China Cultural Center in Tanzania, meets with Aisha Ngati, acting head of the Tanzania National Library. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

On March 4, the cultural counselor of Chinese embassy in Tanzania Wang Siping met with the acting head of the Tanzania National Library, Aisha Ngati, exchanging ideas in further cooperation between China and Tanzania.

The curator said China donated a large amount of books to the Tanzania National Library. The digital reading room designed by Chinese librarians has proven to be a valuable asset in elevating operation efficiency and reading experience.

In recent years, as the bilateral exchange strengthen, more Tanzanian people are becoming interested in China and Chinese culture. According to Wang Siping, China will keep supporting the cultural undertakings in Tanzania, through cultural program, book donation, staff training and also information sharing.

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2020-03-09 14:32:57
<![CDATA[Early-spring flowers bloom in Northwest China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/09/content_1476863.htm

It's bloomin' marvelous in Northwest China as canola flowers carpet the river banks and other plants begin to flower.

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2020-03-09 08:48:43
<![CDATA[Famed waterfall in Yunnan province ideal for spring tour]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/09/content_1476880.htm

People raft in Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spring view of Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]


People raft in Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spring view of Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spring view of Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spring view of Jiulong Waterfall scenic area, Luoping county, Yunnan province, March 8, 2020. Rise of temperature in early spring brings out a scene of refreshing beauty around the Jiulong Waterfall, which is a hot destination in the province. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-03-09 10:53:01
<![CDATA[All the beautiful color in spring]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/07/content_1476878.htm

More than 200 cherry trees blossom in Changsha's Wangyue Park, forming a scenery with the intersected lake. [Photo by Xu Xing/For China Daily]

No winter is insurmountable. Then comes the spring, with the explosiveness of longer days and songbirds returning to the willows along the river banks. The silent ground wakes from cold winter, everything is at its best.

As the spring comes, trees take on the green color, and the smell of the grass is flowing in the air.

In the heartland of Hunan province, the spring breeze comes through the fields and hills like a beating paintbrush. Wherever it dances, it paints in lush color. The birds fly out from home in a sunny blue sky.


In the Hengyang Ecological Park, a chickadee flies over plum blossoms. [Photo by Zhang Jingming/For China Daily]

It's an annual spring phenomenon that occurs with the blossoming of local poplar and willow trees. With the warmer weather emerges, the more discerning and lazier eater in us.

The land from every corner of the air is full of spring. With the wonder of your love for spring, the sun above always shines.


Farmers are busy ploughing in Mangtouzhai village, Daoxian county. [Photo by He Hongfu/For China Daily]


In Liaoshi village, Liaojiang town, Zixing, Hunan province, 10,000 acres of rapeseed flowers are in bloom, and the villagers plant the words "spring" in the fields. [Photo by Zhu Xiaorong/For China Daily]


Workers are busy picking sunflowers in a greenhouse at Longhualing village, Ansha town, Changsha. [Photo by Guo Liliang/For China Daily]


Farmers dig lotus roots in Siping village, Longshan county. [Photo by Feng Xianghui/For China Daily]


The plum trees bloom against a backdrop of green grass in the Orange Isle, a scenic spot in Changsha. [Photo by Li Jian/For China Daily]

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2020-03-07 10:00:00
<![CDATA[Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie becomes icy wonderland]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/07/content_1476876.htm

Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]

After several days' rainfall and drop in temperature, the national forest park of Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie has been transformed into a dreamlike destination with clouds and icy rime.

Viewed from the top of the mountain at an altitude of over 1,500 meters, the peaks and forests are covered with ice and snow, forming various shapes of rime ?a rare sight in March.

The scenic area has taken precautions amid the current epidemic, since its official reopening on March 2. Through April 30 all adult visitors get a 50 percent discount, and tickets are free of charge for medical workers during the entire year.


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]


Glittering rime creates a wonderland at Tianmen Mountain in Zhangjiajie, Central China's Hunan province. [Photos by Qin Shaobo/for chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-03-07 10:00:00
<![CDATA[China Cultural Center in Bangkok opens online classes]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/06/content_1476831.htm

A teacher working at the China Cultural Center in Bangkok gives a livestreamed class to his students amid the coronavirus outbreak. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Although the COVID-19 outbreak has caused a massive closure of schools, it has also urged schools to advance experiments with livestreamed classes to keep teaching and learning uninterrupted during this special time.

Since March 1, the China Cultural Center in Bangkok has also taken part in the experiment by moving all seven of its Chinese classes online, a measure to protect students' safety while maintaining their Chinese learning.

This screenshot shows students interacting with their teacher during an online Chinese class offered by the China Cultural Center in Bangkok. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Aside from preparation to guarantee a stable internet connection, the center's staff came up with methods in advance to cope with problems that may arise during the online courses. Furthermore, all online classes have been conducted in the same manner as offline ones and all homework, written or oral, is required to be sent to the teachers' email boxes for grading.

The online courses have proven popular among the center's students, who said they are happy to be able to attend classes amid the epidemic.

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2020-03-06 16:11:05
<![CDATA[Chinese books featured at Bangladesh's national book fair]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/06/content_1476850.htm

Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, gives souvenirs to local readers in front of the China Book House at the Ekushey Book Fair 2020 at Bangla Academy in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Feb 28, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, visited the China Book House, a booth at the Ekushey Book Fair 2020 on Friday at Bangla Academy in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

The Ekushey Book Fair is Bangladesh's national book fair, held throughout February each year. The China Book House, co-organized by the Chinese embassy to Bangladesh and China Media Group, was unveiled on Feb 2, marking the first time Chinese books have been featured at the book fair.

About 1,000 Chinese books on culture, economics and politics, and China-Bangladesh bilateral ties were on display, attracting nearly 10,000 local readers throughout the event.


Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, gifts Chinese books to Bangla Academy in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Feb 28, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Li talked to local readers and encouraged them to learn more about the real situation in Chinese society through these books.

The China Book House is the only foreign booth among the 560 booths featured at this year's book fair, and has opened a window through which Bangladeshi readers can know about China, said Habibullah Sirajee, director general of the Bangla Academy. He added that they look to keep this window open.


Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, poses for a group photo with local guests and readers at the Ekushey Book Fair 2020 at Bangla Academy in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Feb 28, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-06 11:55:00
<![CDATA[Chinese female painters in late imperial era]]> http://govt.chinadaily.com.cn/topics/cultureandarts/chinesefamalepainters/

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2020-03-06 17:03:19
<![CDATA[China's Original Ballet Productions]]> https://govt.chinadaily.com.cn/topics/cultureandarts/chinaoriginalballet/

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2020-03-06 16:53:10
<![CDATA[Bangladeshis send warm support to Chinese people]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/05/content_1476726.htm

Since the COVID-19 outbreak, Bangladeshis have been extending love and support to the people in Wuhan and all around China, which shows the deep friendship between the two peoples.

Due to the unusual circumstances, many Bangladeshi students have stayed in China, including 240 currently in Wuhan, the center of the novel coronavirus battle. On Feb 26, a condolence letter was issued by Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, expressing his greetings to the students and confidence that the challenge will be overcome.

Warm comments from netizens in response to the letter from Chinese ambassador to the Bangladeshi students in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The post, widely circulated online, has received a warm response and nearly 2,000 likes and comments. Netizens commended the strong sense of responsibility shown by the embassy and the Chinese government.

"Never seen such [a] caring message from the top most authority in order to make students feel safe wherever they are," said Asif H Rohed on Facebook. "We are always with China. [A t]rue friend doesn't leave her friend in a bad time," wrote Ariful Islam Adil.

The letter by Li Jiming, Chinese ambassador to Bangladesh, to the Bangladeshi students in China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-03-05 13:30:00
<![CDATA[Professor promotes Henan Yu Opera via live streaming]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/05/content_1476715.htm

Li Jinling (L) communicates with a staff member before live streaming at the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling performs Henan Yu Opera "Hua Mulan" at the live streaming room of the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling performs Henan Yu Opera "Hua Mulan" at the live streaming room of the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling performs Henan Yu Opera "Hua Mulan" at the live streaming room of the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling performs Henan Yu Opera "Hua Mulan" at the live streaming room of the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling (L) communicates with a staff member before live streaming at the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]


Li Jinling performs Henan Yu Opera "Hua Mulan" at the live streaming room of the cultural center in Zhengzhou, capital of Central China's Henan province, March 3, 2020. Li Jinling is a professor working at the music and dance school of the Zhengzhou Institute of Technology. She is also a disciple of Henan Yu Opera, learning from the noted actress Chang Xiangyu's second daughter Chen Xiaoxiang since 14. For years she has been dedicated to the heritage and development of the art form, performing and teaching Henan Yu Opera for free as a volunteer. After the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China, Henan cultural center launched a live streaming platform on line to promote culture and arts. Li Jinling began to perform and teach Henan Yu Opera as a volunteer again, but this time on line. She believes that this is a nice way to promote the cultural heritage to the audience during the special period.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-03-05 08:59:50
<![CDATA[Chinese export porcelain at the heart of Milan exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/04/content_1476642.htm

An 18th-century porcelain model of a Dutch ship, from the Royal Academy of Arts collection, on show. [Photo by Richard Valencia for China Daily]

It is believed that China began to export porcelain to the rest of the world during the Tang Dynasty (618-907). These exquisite pieces, which feature semi-translucent illumination, were first transported to ports in Asia and Africa, and finally reached Europe in the 14th century. Large orders for Chinese ceramics from Europe led to booming trade between the two sides.

The Porcelain Room, an ongoing exhibition through Sept 28 at Fondazione Prada in Milan, explores this dynamic section of the economic and cultural exchanges between China and Europe by showing more than 1,700 vintage Chinese export ceramics.

Curated by Jorge Welsh and Luisa Vinhais, the exhibition looks into the historic background, scope and influence of Chinese ceramic exports between the 16th and 19th centuries.

It is a celebration of the creativity and efficiency of Chinese porcelain producers tailored to the needs of different markets that varied in taste, religion and social customs.


An 18th-century pair of chrysanthemum flower-shaped tureens, from the Royal Academy of Arts collection, on show. [Photo by Richard Valencia for China Daily]


An 18th-century crab-shape tureen, from the Royal Academy of Arts collection, on show. [Photo by Richard Valencia for China Daily]


A porcelain model of a ship manufactured in Jindezhen kilns, from the Royal Academy of Arts collection, on show. [Photo by Richard Valencia for China Daily]


A 17th-century cobalt blue qinghua bottle, from the Royal Academy of Arts collection, on show. [Photo by Richard Valencia for China Daily]


A 16th-century ewer from the collection of Fundação Carmona e Costa on show. [Photo by José Manuel Costa Alves for China Daily]

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2020-03-04 08:36:25
<![CDATA[A glimpse of spring vitality through paintings]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/04/content_1476640.htm

Silver Pheasants under Wisteria, a painting by Wang Xuetao. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]

Flower–and-birds paintings began to gain a position of increasing importance in the world of Chinese art in the seventh century. The works, which present lively scenes of birds flying between and resting on a variety of blossoms in a vibrant color scheme, bring viewers a touch of spring.

Beijing Fine Art Academy boasts a collection of fine flower-and-bird pieces produced by prominent painters active in the 20th century. Through these depictions of nature, one can also get a glimpse of the diversity of the art communities in Beijing and Shanghai at the time.


Peonies and Pomegranates, a painting by Wu Changshuo. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]

Featured figures included Wu Changshuo, recognized a leading reformer of art in South China, who integrated the forms of Chinese calligraphy into his body of work. His approach to painting became well-received among an emerging group of middle-class city dwellers.

Another noted painter at the time was Qi Baishi, who took Wu's advice to adopt a carefree style. His paintings juxtapose small insects drawn with meticulous brushwork and blooming green plants painted with loose strokes, thereafter achieving a poetic feeling in Qi's fans, mostly in North China.


Morning Dew, a painting by Cui Zifan. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]


Lotus and Halcyon, a painting by Wang Shensheng. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]


Ducks, a painting by Lou Shibai. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]


Crane, a painting by Qi Baishi. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]


Blossoms, a painting by Chen Banding. [Photo/Courtesy of Beijing Fine Art Academy]

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2020-03-04 08:35:18
<![CDATA[Egyptian heritage sites light up support for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/03/content_1476561.htm

This photo taken on March 1, 2020, shows the Citadel of Saladin at night in Cairo, the capital of Egypt. Three UNESCO World Heritage sites in Egypt's Cairo, Luxor and Aswan have been lit up in the colors and pattern of China's national flag. The light show aims to send support and blessings from the Egyptian people to China, which is currently fighting against the novel coronavirus outbreak.[Photo/Xinhua]


This photo taken on March 1, 2020, shows the temple of Karnak, Luxor, Egypt. Three UNESCO World Heritage sites in Egypt's Cairo, Luxor and Aswan have been lit up in the colors and pattern of China's national flag. The light show aims to send support and blessings from the Egyptian people to China, which is currently fighting against the novel coronavirus outbreak.[Photo/Xinhua]


This photo taken on March 1, 2020, shows the temple of Philae, Aswan, Egypt. Three UNESCO World Heritage sites in Egypt's Cairo, Luxor and Aswan have been lit up in the colors and pattern of China's national flag. The light show aims to send support and blessings from the Egyptian people to China, which is currently fighting against the novel coronavirus outbreak.[Photo/Xinhua]


This photo taken on March 1, 2020, shows the temple of Karnak, Luxor, Egypt. Three UNESCO World Heritage sites in Egypt's Cairo, Luxor and Aswan have been lit up in the colors and pattern of China's national flag. The light show aims to send support and blessings from the Egyptian people to China, which is currently fighting against the novel coronavirus outbreak.[Photo/Xinhua]


A man takes a selfie in front of the temple of Karnak, Luxor, Egypt, Mar 1, 2020.Three UNESCO World Heritage sites in Egypt's Cairo, Luxor and Aswan have been lit up in the colors and pattern of China's national flag. The light show aims to send support and blessings from the Egyptian people to China, which is currently fighting against the novel coronavirus outbreak.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-03-03 10:32:36
<![CDATA[Fashion industry in C China join online sales amid novel coronavirus outbreak]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/03/content_1476559.htm

A model shows clothes by live broadcast at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. A large number of clothing stores and garment merchants in Zhuzhou have joined online sales to resume work during the fight against the novel coronavirus. [Photo/Xinhua]


A model shows clothes by live broadcast at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A model shows clothes by live broadcast at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A merchant takes photos of a model at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A merchant marks the clothes for online sales at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A model selects clothes for live broadcast at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Merchants package clothes for online sales at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A model shows clothes by live broadcast at a clothing store of a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Staff register information of a man who wants to enter into a garment market in Zhuzhou, Central China's Hunan province, March 2, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-03-03 09:03:13
<![CDATA[Canada children's choir sings new song to cheer for Wuhan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/03/content_1476527.htm

The C5 Canadian children's choir, a musical group of Chinese Canadian youngsters, performs a new song dedicated to the city of Wuhan. Completed and rehearsed within two weeks, the song sends love and support for the people fighting on the front line of the novel coronavirus disease.

The hearts and thoughts of children from Ottawa, Canada, are with China. Guan Yadong, composer of the song and founder of the choir, said Wuhan is a heroic city. "I'd like to introduce this beautiful place to all the children. We should be very proud of Wuhan," she said.

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2020-03-03 10:41:02
<![CDATA[Self-made sugarman]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/03/content_1476509.htm

Louis To, aka Sugarman, is a self-made sugar art master in Hong Kong. He is one of the very few artisans in the city that still perform the centuries-old folk art for people. Kneading out animal figures from hot sugar, Louis pursues the joy of exchanging happiness with every customer.

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2020-03-03 08:45:09
<![CDATA[Romanian children's choir supports China through music]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/02/content_1476465.htm

"Sing with your passion, stretch out your hands; let me embrace your dream and connect each other with sincerity." The melody goes on as the Allegretto children's choir performed a medley of Chinese songs Saturday to cheer China during the battle against the novel coronavirus.

The youngsters expressed their confidence and hope for the future through many beloved music pieces, including March of the Volunteers, Tomorrow Will Be Better and Sing and Laughter.

The choir has visited China many times in the past. The president of the Allegretto children's foundation said their songs embody their best wishes for China and hope all Chinese children grow happy and healthy.

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2020-03-02 16:29:09
<![CDATA[Santa sends best wishes in outbreak fight from Arctic Circle]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-03/02/content_1476415.htm

Santa Claus has sent his greetings ?a little bit early ?to his friends in China fighting against the COVID-19 outbreak.

The jolly old man, loved by children around the world, sat alongside Esko Lotvonen, mayor of Rovaniemi, and Sanna Karkkainen, managing director of Visit Rovaniemi from the official hometown of Santa Claus on the Arctic Circle in Lapland, to send their best wishes to China.

"We live on the other side of the world, but through our hearts, we are together with you," said Santa.

"Personally and on behalf of the city of Rovaniemi, I would like to express my support and sympathy for China, especially for those who have been infected with coronavirus. Things will get better for sure, and we (will) meet again," Lotvonen said.

"We understand the struggle and would like to offer the best possible support and assistance in this challenging time," Karkkainen said.

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2020-03-02 09:38:47
<![CDATA[British Council expresses solidarity and support for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/29/content_1476406.htm

With the support of the UK embassy in China, British Council, the UK's international organization for cultural relations and educational opportunities, invited the UN messenger of peace Jane Goodall, opera actor John Owen-Jones, the Great Wall researcher William Lindsay, and teachers and students from across UK colleges and universities, to send through a short video their blessings and support for China's fight against the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Click the video above to watch.

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2020-02-29 14:38:38
<![CDATA[Novel heroes: Iranian barista does his part in Wuhan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/25/content_1476391.htm

Sina Karami from Iran is a barista at a café named Wakanda in Wuhan, Hubei province.

There are several hospitals near the café treating patients with novel coronavirus. His cafe delivers coffee to nearby hospitals free every day, offering support to medical staff.

This year is the second year Sina and his brother have lived in Wuhan. After the coronavirus outbreak, the Iranian government dispatched charter flights to Wuhan to repatriate nationals. Sina's brother decided to go back to Iran and wanted Sina to go with him, but Sina's choice was to stay. Xina said he would not leave Wuhan at this difficult moment.

Sina also said despite the risks brought by the epidemic, the fearlessness of medical staff also impresses him, and he will not retreat ?instead, he will continue to provide help to medical staff.

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2020-02-25 07:30:00
<![CDATA[Shanghai dancers voice reciprocal support for Japan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476389.htm

Principal dancers with the Shanghai Dance Theatre Zhu Jiejing and Wang Jiajun made a short video voicing their support for people in Japan affected by the novel coronavirus breakout, in gratitude for Japanese dancers' support to China days ago.

The video clip was made and released on Feb 24 by the Shanghai People's Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries and the dance company. The three-minute video showed mutual visits between Chinese and Japanese dance artists, as well as the large amount of medical supplies donated by all walks of people in Japan.

Earlier this month one of the most prestigious ballet companies in the country, the Matsuyama Ballet Troupe, made a video of encouragement for China by singing in Chinese the National Anthem of China, and calling out, "I love China. Be strong, Wuhan. Be strong, China. Be strong, all humans!"

"Now the novel coronavirus breakout has become a disaster faced by not only China and Japan, but even people all over the world," Zhu said in the video, a reciprocal move from the Chinese dancing theater. "Everyone has to be brave, strong and fearless, protecting the earth, our shared home."

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2020-02-26 15:37:45
<![CDATA[Shanghai Ballet dancers resume practice and rehearsals]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476386.htm

Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus, which has resulted in the cancellation or postponement of the company's tours and performances for 2020.

"We decided to make use of this special period to practice and rehearse a new dance theater production named Fragments of the Memory," said Lu Jiashi, a spokesperson for Shanghai Ballet, on Feb 26.

The company, which celebrated its 40th birthday last year, had a successful tour in the United States in January, where it gave four performances of Swan Lake at the Lincoln Center.


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]


Dancers of Shanghai Ballet have resumed their daily practice sessions despite the outbreak of novel coronavirus. [Photo by Gao Erqiang/chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-02-26 17:58:31
<![CDATA[Retrospective on Silk Road in New Zealand photo show]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/28/content_1476367.htm

The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

To celebrate Chinese New Year, the China Cultural Center in Wellington cooperated with the government of Kucha in China's Xinjiang Uyghur autonomous region and launched two photo exhibitions about the historical heritage of Kucha city.

With 70 photographs, the exhibits covers a wide range of Kucha's local history, including the Buddhist monastery, the beacon tower dating back to the ancient Silk Road, forests of Euphrates poplar trees and the unique Yardang landforms.


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

"Next time I'm in China, l want to visit these treasured historic sites and imagine the fascinating stories about the monk Xuanzang and the ancient Silk Road," said Micheal Stephens, honorary chairman of the New Zealand Film Festival in China.

"These photos showcase the extraordinary landforms in Xinjiang," said photographer Simon Moore. "To any photography enthusiast, Xinjiang is a must-see destination. I'd very much like to view the resilient Euphrates poplar thriving in the desert."

"Images transcend languages," said Guo Zongguang, director of the China Cultural Center in Wellington. "This exhibition opens a window for people in New Zealand to experience the marvelous culture in Xinjiang."


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


The photo exhibition in Auckland and Wellington has attracted more than 50,000 visitors from Jan 25 to Feb 2, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-28 14:05:22
<![CDATA[French artists sing 'Together' to support Wuhan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/28/content_1476368.htm

As Victor Hugo once said, "Music expresses that which cannot be put into words, and that which cannot remains silent."

Musicals from France have enjoyed popularity in China ever since French performing artists sang at Shanghai Culture Square in 2017. With hit productions including Notre Dame de Paris and Mozart L'Opera Rock, Chinese audiences have resonated with and been touched by French vocal performances.

Because of the ongoing COVID-19 epidemic, we cannot step foot into theaters to experience art firsthand. To keep the music going and as a show of support to Wuhan, French musical artist Laurent Bàn gathered a star-studded cast, 40 of the country's most celebrated artists, to perform a song titled Together. "We look up at the same night sky, please don't give up hope, because we are together!" Bàn says.

The fog will lift, and the sun is bound to rise again. Together, we can win this fight.

Video provided by Joyway

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2020-02-28 14:10:30
<![CDATA[Sudan college supports China through cutural exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/27/content_1476256.htm  

Students hold handwritten Chinese slogans to support China in the battle against the novel coronavirus on Feb 25, 2020. Teachers and students of Chinese at the University of Khartoum in Sudan support epidemic-stricken China through an exhibition featuring Chinese culture. [Photo/Xinhua]


Teachers and students of Chinese at the University of Khartoum in Sudan support epidemic-stricken China through an exhibition featuring Chinese culture,Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-27 10:00:18
<![CDATA[TCM widely applied in treating infected patients]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476254.htm

Yan Liqiong, a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) produces doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. TCM has been widely applied in treating infected patients as it has proved effective in improving the cure rate. Since the epidemic outbreak, the time-honored treatment has been applied in treating over 60,000 confirmed cases of the infection in China. [Photo/Xinhua]


A pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) arranges doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Leng Caixia (L), a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Zhou Lei, a pharmacist of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), prepares herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Pharmacists of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) prepare herbs to produce doses of TCM decoctions to help combat the novel coronavirus epidemic at Xiaogan Chinese Medical Hospital in Xiaogan city, central China's Hubei province, Feb 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-26 16:47:26
<![CDATA[Exhibition introduces Chinese landscape in Sydney]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476208.htm

The Beautiful China photo exhibition is being held at the China Cultural Center in Sydney until March 6. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A photo exhibition, Beautiful China, which showcases China's natural and cultural landscape, opened at the China Cultural Center in Sydney on Feb 12.

Consisting of 32 artworks celebrating the abundant heritage all around China, the display was organized by the China Cultural Center and the China tourism office, both in Sydney.

"China has an enormous amount of tourism resources," said Xiao Xiayong, director of the China Cultural Center in Sydney. "We host this exhibit to introduce China's scenic beauty and cultural charm to the Australian public."

The Beautiful China photo exhibition is being held at the China Cultural Center in Sydney until March 6. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

All photos on display are unretouched, emphasizing the natural subjects without any photo-revising software. Visitors are able to view many magnificent Chinese landmarks, such as the Great Wall, Mogao Grottoes, Taishan Mountain and Potala Palace.

The exhibition will run through March 6.

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2020-02-26 15:55:37
<![CDATA[Stunning snow scenery captured in photos]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/26/content_1476174.htm

The Yellow River surrounded by snow, by Mei Sheng. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]

A series of landscape photographs taken by Mei Sheng portraying some stunning snow scenery has drawn many views online. "I want to ease people's minds and moods during the current epidemic through these photos, which show the pure beauty of nature, said Mei. "As medical expert Wang Fusheng once said in an interview, 'A good mood offers strong immunity.'" He believes that this kind of incredible beauty can touch others, give people power and also inspire them to reconsider the relationship between nature and humans.

Photographer Mei Sheng is an imaging specialist for world heritage and has won the Golden Statue Award for China Photography.


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A waterfall surrounded by snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


Birds on the snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


A snowy landscape. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]


Trees covered with snow. [Photo by Mei Sheng/cpanet.org.cn]

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2020-02-26 10:39:24
<![CDATA[Honey glazed lotus root with jujube and osmanthus]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/25/content_1476104.htm

Ingredients

1 pc Lotus Root (Approx. 400g)

100g Glutinous Rice

10 Pitted Red Jujubes

3/4 Slab of Raw Cane Sugar

800ml Water

Osmanthus Syrup

1 Tbsp Dried Osmanthus

2 Tbsps Honey

Honey glazed lotus root with jujube and osmanthus, a dish from Grace Choy's book Choy Choy Kitchen.

 

Instructions

1.Rinse the Lotus Root. Trim off and Reserve the Tips.

2.Soak the Jujube in Water for 15 mins and set aside.

3.Soak the Glutinous Rice in Water for 3 to 4 hours and set aside.

4.Soak the Dried Osmanthus in Water for 5 mins.

5.Stuff the Lotus Root with Glutinous Rice with the help of a Chopstick. When done, Put the Tips Back in Place and Secure with Toothpicks.

6.Bring a Pot of Water to a Boil on High Heat. When the Water Boils, add the Jujubes and Cane Sugar. Stir Briefly then add the Lotus Root and Cook on High Heat for 45 mins.

6.1. Reduce Heat to Medium and Cook for another 30 mins. Turn off Heat and Let Rest Covered for 15 mins.

7. When Done, put the Lotus Root into Cold Water to Cool down for 10 mins.

8. After cool down, Take out the Toothpicks and Peel it. Cut into 2 cm Slices.

9.To prepare the Osmanthus Syrup, Add approx. 1 bowl of the Jujube Soup to a Pan and turn on High Heat. Add the Osmanthus and Honey, Stir Constantly until thoroughly Mixed then Turn Off Heat.

10. Finally Pour the Hot Syrup on the Lotus Root Slices and serve. Enjoy!

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2020-02-25 14:13:54
<![CDATA[Auckland Girls' Choir sends support through song]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/25/content_1476103.htm

Together With You, a bilingual song in Chinese and English, was composed and recorded by New Zealand's Auckland Girls' Choir to deliver messages of love and support to epidemic-stricken China.

Leonie Lawson, aged 89, is the founder of the choir and wrote the English lyrics of the song. "There was a strong feeling amongst the girls, they want to help Wuhan. I know the Chinese people will have a very good fighting spirit when they face something difficult. So I use that aspect in writing and made a lively tune that had power behind it", Lawson said in an interview.

From the genesis of the idea to final recording, it took four days for the Auckland Girls' Choir to complete the heartwarming song, finishing on Feb 14 ?Valentine’s Day.

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2020-02-25 14:04:44
<![CDATA[Bangladeshis, global artists express support for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/24/content_1476025.htm

Last Friday, tens of thousands of people in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka paid tribute to the country's language movement activists who sacrificed their lives on that day in 1952. Artists from more than 10 countries participated in the memorial event and expressed their support for the current battle in China against the novel coronavirus.

Artists and cultural workers show support to China on International Mother Language Day in Dhaka, Bangladesh on Feb 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Teachers from the local Confucius Institute and Chinese Embassy in Bangladesh performed the Bengalese song Ami Bangla Gaan Gaai and Chinese song Love Will Triumph to cheer on the heroes fighting on the front lines of the nationwide battle against the outbreak.

Students from Bangladesh show support to China. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Since the beginning of 2020, Bengalis from all circles including arts, education, religion, media and sports, have voiced their support for the Chinese people. Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina wrote in a letter to China the thoughts of her country's people will always be with China, and that they will overcome this challenge together.

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2020-02-24 14:24:57
<![CDATA[Cast members of film 'Minamata' attend photocall at Berlin film festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/22/content_1475994.htm

Author Aileen Mioko Smith of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Johnny Depp of film "Minamata" attends a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Director, producer and screenwriter Andrew Levitas of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actor Bill Naghy of film "Minamata" poses for photos after a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actress Akiko Iwase of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actress Minami of film "Minamata" attends a press conference during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Cast members of film "Minamata" attend a photocall during the 70th Berlin International Film Festival in Berlin, capital of Germany, Feb 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-22 09:52:19
<![CDATA[Local heroes]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/22/content_1475992.htm

People's Liberation Army soldiers patrol Tian'anmen Square in Beijing. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]

The novel coronavirus outbreak has temporarily put a halt to normal, bustling city life. Silence now marks the Chinese capital as companies offer their employees a variety of ways to resume production, including chartered transportation service for daily commuters to curb the spread of the epidemic, while many are provided with a choice to work at home.

However, delivery riders still brave the wind with their electric scooters to make sure those who work at home can get their meals and food supplies.


Staff members disinfect the block at Sanlitun Soho. [Photo by Zhang Wei/China Daily]

Due to the severity of the epidemic, the entrances of many communities are locked. Now, the goods are placed in front of the entrance, waiting to be picked up. Staff members measure the temperature of each visitor.

Some fresh produce distributors have ramped up scheduled minivan support to provide daily necessities outside the community entrance. To avoid close people-to - people contact, delivering to the customer's door is prohibited.


Staff members disinfect a road outside the National Stadium. [Photo by Wei Xiaohao/China Daily]

Sanitation workers toil away on the roads to keep things tidy. Cleaning workers disinfect the roads and business areas while wearing masks and gloves as a precaution against the virus.

The Beijing subway and bus operators have increased the frequency of buses and subway trains, limited passenger numbers during rush hours and enhanced disinfection.

These measures will curb the transmission of the virus that might spread during the travel season and guarantee the safety of both workers and their workplaces.


Cleaning workers disinfect a platform at China World Mall in Beijing. [Photo by Wei Xiaohao/China Daily]


A delivery rider braves the snow with his electric scooter in Beijing's Wangjing area. [Photo by Wang Zhuangfei/China Daily]


Sanitation workers clean the road at Tian'anmen Square in Beijing. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]


Few people are seen at Dashilar, Qianmen Street. [Photo by Feng Yongbin/China Daily]


Police officers patrol the square at Beijing Railway Station. [Photo by Zou Hong/China Daily]

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2020-02-22 09:29:41
<![CDATA[Nature photographer dedicates life to conservation]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/21/content_1475960.htm

Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2018 [Photo/Wild China Film]

The public has placed a renewed focus on wildlife protection after the novel coronavirus outbreak.

Passionate about wildlife, Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film, captured some of the best photos taken of one of the most beautiful birds in China ?the green peacock ?20 years ago in Lancang River Basin in Yunnan province. Now, fewer than 500 of the birds may still exist.

Xi has photographed countless rare wild animals. He says good wildlife work can cut through to people's hearts, and that is the power of nature.


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 1995 [Photo/Wild China Film]

In 1995 he filmed the documentary Mystery of the Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkey. It was the first time humans had recorded the activities of the monkeys on film. Xi started work on another documentary, Mystery Monkeys of Shangri-La, in 2012.

In 1997 he entered Hoh Xil Nature Reserve in Qinghai and took direct photographic evidence Tibetan antelopes had been poached.


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2010 [Photo/Wild China Film]

The Chinese Wildlife Photography Training Camp Xi set up 15 years ago has focused on cultivating more wildlife photographers to make the best nature movies in China.

There is more to photography than just taking pictures, Xi said. "Photography is a tool, a powerful weapon for nature conservation."

Xi and his wife Shi Lihong make 50 to 60 public speeches a year around the globe on average to promote their causes.


Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2018 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Green peacock, Yunnan province, 2017 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys, Yunnan province, 2002 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


A newly born Tibetan antelope in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2000 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2006 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Tibetan antelopes in Hoh Xil, Qinghai province, 2011 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Yunnan snub-nosed monkey, Yunnan province, 2019 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Skulls of Tibetan antelopes, Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, 1998 [Photo/Wild China Film]


Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film,[Photo/Wild China Film]


Xi Zhinong, founder of Wild China Film [Photo/Wild China Film]

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2020-02-21 15:53:50
<![CDATA[Berklee students compose song to honor frontline medical workers]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/21/content_1475892.htm

Four Chinese students studying at the Berklee College of Music in Boston released a song, Waiting for Your Return, on Friday to pay tribute to medical workers fighting in the front line of the nationwide battle against the coronavirus outbreak.

Chinese students studying at the Berklee College of Music in Boston released a song, Waiting for Your Return, on Feb 14, 2020 to pay tribute to medical workers fighting in the front line of the nationwide battle against the coronavirus outbreak. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The song’s video has so far logged over 900,000 views since it was posted on China’s Twitter-like social media app Weibo, via China Daily’s official Weibo account on Sunday. “Our hearts are with our motherland wherever we are,?read one comment under the video, among hundreds of others.

In addition, Chinese students at Berklee are planning to partner with students from other universities in Boston and hold charity concerts to raise money for epidemic-stricken areas. Their plan is endorsed by the college, which will offer on-campus venues for the concerts.

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2020-02-21 10:34:23
<![CDATA[Braised pork ribs with sea cucumber]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/20/content_1475846.htm

1.Pork ribs : 600 grams

2.Frozen sea cucumber : 8 pcs

(approx. 60 grams each)

3.Dried mushroom : 10 pcs (600 ml hot water to soak)

4.Garlic dice: 1 Tbsp

5.Ginger slices :2 pcs

6.Star anise :2 pcs

7.Spring onion dice: 1 Tbsp

8.Cooking oil :2 Tbsp

9.Shaoxing wine :1 Tbsp

Seasonings:

1.Light soy sauce (生抽): 2 Tbsp

2.Oyster sauce: 3 Tbsp

3.Rock sugar: 2 pcs

4.Salt: 1 tsp

Braised Pork ribs with sea cucumber, a dish from Grace Choy's book Choy Choy Kitchen.[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Preparations and Steps:

1.Rinse mushroom, soak in hot water for at least 2 hours, cut the stems, keep mushroom water ( do not throw it away);

2. Defrost sea cucumber in cold water, running water to rinse out the sands and scrape away the intestine, then cut into pcs;

3. Wash Pork ribs, soak in hot water for 5 mins, then running water to rinse out the bloody, drain it, kitchen towel to pat it dry;

4. Add 2 Tbsp oil into the pot, add ginger, garlic, turn high heat, add pork ribs, Shaoxing wine, light soy sauce, oyster sauce, fast stir fry it for 2 mins, turn off the heat, pick up the pork ribs, ginger and garlic, set aside;

Braised Pork ribs with sea cucumber. [Photo by Grace Choy/provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

5.Use same pot, add mushroom, rock sugars,high heat to stir fry for 2 mins, add mushroom water(water level should over mushroom, (add hot water if necessary), close lid to cook for 10 mins, turn to medium heat to cook for another 20 mins;

6.30 mins later, open lid, add pork ribs, ginger and garlic (add hot water if necessary), stir it, close lid, continue to cook for 20 mins;

7. 20 mins later, add sea cucumber, stir it, cook for 15 mins;

8. Finally, add salt and stir it, springkle spring onion and serve! Enjoy!

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2020-02-20 13:58:20
<![CDATA[Musicians from the world are 'together' with China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/19/content_1475791.htm

Musicians from 19 countries collaborated to create this song Together: Wuhan Stay Strong.

Music has no borders, neither does love.

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2020-02-19 11:55:57
<![CDATA[Adapted Michael Jackson song heartens Chinese amid epidemic fight]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/19/content_1475756.htm

Last week, a music video to show worldwide support for China's efforts against the COVID-19 went viral on Chinese social media.

The song, China, You Are Not Alone, was adapted from a song by Michael Jackson. All the lead singers in the video are from Cuba while the other participants are of various nationalities.

They recorded audio and video materials with their mobile phones and other tools from their homes in different cities, and then sent them to Shenzhen Meifeiya Culture Communication Co. Ltd, where the video was finally compiled and finished.

Annie Xu, the founder of the company from China, initiated the creation of the production.

"At first, we planned to donate money, but we didn't know how to donate, and it was not much actually. So we decided to use what we are good at to contribute our part ?music. Everyone agreed and we started to work on it," Xu said.

The idea was backed up by the employees, a group of expat musicians who live in China.

"We are surprised that the video was so much liked. Many people sent messages to us to show appreciation," Xu told People's Daily on Monday. "It's our simple wish that the music can bring people some warmth and encouragement."

The musicians who took part in the video's making were also happy to do something meaningful at this particular time. "They all study and work in China, which they take it as their second home," Xu said.

Daymara Viñals Acosta, from Cuba, a lead singer in the video who lives in Guangzhou, said she is so sad that many people in China are suffering from the epidemic and China is having a bad time.

"[We hope] to give encouragement to the Chinese people, that they know they are not alone, even going through this difficult moment, the world supports them," Acosta told People's Daily via WeChat on Sunday.

She is impressed by the nation's concerted efforts in fighting against the virus and is confident in the victory. "It is well controlled, everywhere you take the temperature," she said. "I think that Chinese doctors have a lot of capacity and experience and have everything under control."

Xu said they are preparing another song for those people who are separated from their loved ones due to the epidemic.

Video: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-19 09:16:21
<![CDATA[Wuhan,be strong: Support from artists at LA Art Show]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/18/content_1475749.htm

Artists expressed their support to Chinese people in battle against coronavirus outbreak at the Los Angeles Art Show, Los Angeles, the US, Feb 5-9. 

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2020-02-18 16:14:15
<![CDATA[Tsinghua students, alums join charity effort]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/18/content_1475718.htm

A charity program titled Supply Fundraiser was started by graduates of Tsinghua University to seek medical supplies from around the world for frontline medical workers by leveraging their skills in global networking.

At present, the program has gathered more than 100 Tsinghua students and alumni from more than 10 countries to cover information collection and translation work in the supply acquisition process.

Mekhri Aliev, a Russian graduate from Tsinghua University now working at Moscow State University, has spared no effort to launch and run the program.

"I was very upset when I heard the news about the outbreak of novel coronavirus. I am very grateful for my time studying at Tsinghua. That is why, despite the fact we are relatively safe in our own countries, I found it is my duty to help in the hour of need," he said.

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2020-02-18 13:23:45
<![CDATA[Calligraphy exhibit in Japan highlights support for China during outbreak]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/18/content_1475717.htm

On Feb 10, a Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition was unveiled at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo.

 

Luo Yuquan, second from left, director of the China Cultural Center in Tokyo, poses with Japanese guests holding a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? at the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition in Tokyo. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, the opening ceremony and speech sessions for the event were cancelled.

However, many Japanese dignitaries in politics and culture visited the exhibition, during which they filmed videos and created calligraphic work to show solidarity with China, especially people in Wuhan, epicenter of the outbreak.

Japanese guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo pose with a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Wuhan Bisheng? meaning “Wuhan is sure to prevail? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

In celebration of the 120th anniversary of the birth of Chinese calligrapher Wang Quchang, hailed as the contemporary Wang Xizhi, an ancient calligrapher in the Jin dynasty (265-420), the show features 65 artworks created by 42 Chinese and Japanese calligraphers, including Wang and his disciples, Su Shishu, president of the China Calligraphers Association, and Fukuda Tatsuo, member of the Japanese House of Representatives.

Japanese guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo pose with a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The exhibit runs through Feb 20.

A Japanese guest to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition held in Tokyo creates a calligraphic work bearing the characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong? [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

Guests to the Chinese and Japanese calligraphy exhibition at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo pose holding a calligraphic work with characters showing support for China, especially people in Wuhan, the epicenter of the epidemic. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-02-18 11:12:45
<![CDATA[Students from Tokyo Shaolin boxing class cheer for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/18/content_1475722.htm

Students at a Shaolin boxing class at the China Cultural Center in Tokyo cheered for Chinese people in fight against the epidemic on Feb 10.

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2020-02-18 14:24:36
<![CDATA[Sandpainting depicts incredible story of pregnant women giving birth amid outbreak]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/18/content_1475671.htm

This sandpainting depicts the true story of several pregnant women diagnosed with the COVID-19 pneumonia, who safely gave birth thanks to the tireless efforts of hardworking medical staff. The winter is cold and harsh because of the outbreak. But the newborn babies have brought a feeling of warmth and hope to all of us.

Video: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-18 09:21:14
<![CDATA[New Zealand kite festival cheers for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/17/content_1475646.htm

The Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9 on the Otaki Beach in Wellington, New Zealand.

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English attracted many visitors?eyes.

It’s the second year that Chinese kites have been featured in the festival, they attracted the attention and affection of viewers. Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soaring high in the sky fit harmoniously with those in the shapes of different ocean fish.

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2020-02-17 14:55:18
<![CDATA[Celebrating in Harmony and Joy: Chinese New Year Photo Exhibition]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/16/content_1475571.htm












 














































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2020-02-16 17:30:17
<![CDATA[Musicians cheer for China at New Zealand music festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/14/content_1475545.htm

An artist at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

At the annual Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival held at Harcourt Park in Wellington, New Zealand, on Feb 8-9, the host Cameron Kapua-Morrell showed his great concern for the Chinese people in the fight against the epidemic along with participating musicians and audience members.

The festival, featuring about 30 artists and performing groups with two days, has been held since 2014.

And this is the first time the China Cultural Center in Wellington was invited.

Music teachers from the center -- Sun Yanshu, Kong Jingyuan and Zuo Ruoyan -- performed a series of classic Chinese and Western songs with bamboo flute, pipa (a four-stringed Chinese instrument) and guzheng (Chinese zither).

As beautiful music can speak for itself, Guo Zongguang, the director of the cultural center, said traditional Chinese music and musical instruments were widely welcomed by the local people at the music festival. He expressed the willingness to find more ways to promote Chinese music in New Zealand.


A Chinese performer plays the guzheng at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


An artist at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


A Chinese performer plays the bamboo flute at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


A Chinese performer plays the pipa at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Artists at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Audience members at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]


Audience members at the sixth Upper Hutt City of Song Music Festival at Harcourt Park, Wellington, New Zealand, Feb 8-9. [Photo by Zhang Jianyong/provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-14 11:54:11
<![CDATA[More young Yemenis learn Chinese for better future]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/14/content_1475519.htm

Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches a student the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

SANAA -- A Chinese song echoed in a classroom in Sanaa, the capital of war-torn Yemen, where around 20 Chinese-learning schoolchildren were singing.

"I love to learn the Chinese language because it is very nice, important and I want to travel to China to complete my studies there," Karim al-Areqi, a student of the private Languages Model School in Sanaa, told Xinhua.

Teacher Mohammed al-Ansi, who studied the language in China and received a university degree, stressed the importance of learning the Chinese language.

"It is the language of the future and it is necessary for all generations to benefit from the tremendous scientific, industrial and economic development in China," he said.


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi writes on a board as he teaches students the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Like many other private elementary and secondary schools in Yemen, the Chinese language is an essential part of the Languages Model School's curriculum, where the students study Chinese as actively as math and other science subjects.

Beside teaching in the school, al-Ansi also gives private lessons to businessmen, merchants, employees and others in Sanaa.

"In teaching the Chinese language, I succeeded in educating many people through an easy curriculum and in a simple and clear way that fits everyone," al-Ansi said proudly, stressing that teaching Chinese has definitely changed his life.


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches students how to write the Chinese characters at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Al-Ansi hopes that Yemen and China will cooperate to establish centers and institutes for teaching the Chinese language in Yemen so that many young people can learn.

"I hope that a branch of the Confucius Institute could be established in Yemen to teach the language and spread the Chinese culture to many students and researchers who are interested in learning the Chinese culture and language," he said.

Many people in Yemen see that learning a foreign language may open a path of hope to a new life, such as getting a better job, increasing income and paving the way to a bright future in the country that has suffered from civil war for nearly five years.


Student learn to write the Chinese characters during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

Despite the bitterness of the conflict, the young Yemeni people are still actively engaged in their society, aspiring to permanent peace and development for their war-ravaged country.

Even before the fighting broke out in early 2015 between the Saudi-backed government of President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi and Iran-backed Houthi rebel group, Yemen was one of the poorest countries in the Arab world.

The war has left thousands of civilians dead and more than 3 million internally displaced. Its impact on the country's infrastructure has been devastating, with major overland routes and airports severely damaged.


A student learns the Chinese language during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi writes on a board as he teaches students the Chinese language at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches as a student writes the Chinese characters at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Yemeni teacher Mohammed al-Ansi teaches students the Chinese language during a lesson at a school in Sanaa, Yemen, Feb 10, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-02-14 09:21:35
<![CDATA[Chinese music instruments displayed in Moscow, Russia]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/14/content_1475517.htm

A visitor looks at a traditional slavic music instrument gusli in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


Visitors look at a traditional slavic music instrument gusli in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A Chinese music instrument Guqin is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A traditional slavic music instrument gusli is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]


A traditional slavic music instrument gusli is seen on display in the Museum of Gusli and Guqin in Moscow, Russia, on Feb 12, 2020. The Museum of Gusli and Guqin -- traditional Russian and Chinese music instruments opened this Wednesday in Moscow.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-02-14 09:17:05
<![CDATA[Kite cheering for China soars high in New Zealand]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/14/content_1475515.htm

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, soars high in the sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, stole the show at the Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9 on the Otaki Beach in Wellington, New Zealand.

The kite, made by local Chinese communities under the initiative of the Chinese Cultural Center in Wellington, shows the strong confidence of Chinese people around the world that the nation will prevail over the coronavirus outbreak that is disrupting the country.


A panda-shaped Chinese kite is featured at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Now in its eighth edition, the Otaki Kite Festival is an annual international event, attracting about 22,ooo contestants and visitors from around the world over this year’s two-day event.

Though it’s only the second year that Chinese kites have been featured in the festival, they attracted the attention and affection of viewers. Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soaring high in the sky fit harmoniously with those in the shapes of different ocean fish.


A silver and purple kite stands out against the blue sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


A blue heart-shaped kite at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Visitors have fun at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas and Peking Opera masks soar at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Fish-shaped kites float above the beach at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Chinese kites in the shapes of giant pandas are among those featured at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


A red heart-shaped kite bearing the yellow characters “Zhongguo Jiayou? meaning “China, stay strong?in English, soars high in the sky at the 2020 Otaki Kite Festival, held from Feb 8-9, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

 

 

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2020-02-14 05:00:00
<![CDATA[Orchestra piece for Wuhan medics]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/13/content_1475448.htm

Because of the coronavirus outbreak, this year was the first time that violinist Zhang Qin hadn't returned to her hometown, Wuhan, Hubei province, for a reunion with her family over Spring Festival.

Zhang, who graduated from the Central Conservatory of Music in the Chinese capital and joined the Beijing Symphony Orchestra in 1999, is now expressing her solidarity with her hometown through music.

The Beijing Symphony Orchestra performs under the baton of Li Biao in a previous concert. [Photo provided to China Daily]

She and 11 fellow musicians from the orchestra played English composer Edward Elgar's piece, Salut d'Amour, under the baton of principal resident conductor, Li Biao, from their homes, and the joint recording was released online on Feb 5.

"It's the first time that our musicians recorded a piece in this way. We wanted to dedicate our performance to the doctors, nurses and people working on the front lines of the battle against the virus," says Li, adding that the piece, originally written for Elgar's wife, was chosen because of its soothing melody and ability to convey good wishes.

The orchestra's musicians participated in the recording from their homes, which are located in different parts of the Chinese mainland and Taipei.

Playing from their homes, 12 musicians from the orchestra perform for an online video to show their support for Wuhan's fight against the virus. [Photo provided to China Daily]

"It may not be a perfect performance, because we couldn't play together face-to-face like we usually do. However, with this different musical experience, we wanted to encourage and comfort people," says Dong Linsong, a violist of the orchestra.

The Beijing Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1977. Its plan to launch its 2020 season of performances has been postponed due to the epidemic. The opening concert was scheduled for Feb 22 at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing, featuring four guest performers from the Berlin Philharmonic, including violinist Alessandro Cappone.

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2020-02-13 07:25:00
<![CDATA[Children from Cambodia donate 5,000 masks to China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/12/content_1475395.htm

Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea launched a mask donation to China at the Cambodian Office of the Yundi Behavior and Health Center. The event soon received about 5,000 masks from 86 local families within 10 days.

These families include children who have recovered from congenital heart disease thanks to the free treatment from the Fuwai Yunnan Cardiovascular Hospital in Kunming, capital city of Yunnan province. Doctors and volunteers from the hospital have gone to poverty-stricken areas in Cambodia on seven trips in the past two years. 86 Cambodian children have also received surgeries in Kunming.

86 Cambodian families donate about 5000 masks at the donation launched by a Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea at the Cambodian Office of the Yundi Behavior and Health Center. [Photo by the Yundi Behavior and Health Center/provided to Chinaculture.org]

One boy, Toutorn, bought 100 masks and brought them to the center after two days?travel from his hometown. Though he is still in recovery, his weight has risen to 34 kilograms from 25. Now, he is able to go back to school.

Luo Zhi, the director of the center, was moved by the boy and his family, as the masks cost Toutom 20 dollars.

“The boy’s mother is the main breadwinner whose salary is less than 100 dollars a month. 20 dollars is not a small expense to the family, yet they didn’t hesitate,?He said.

Toutorn’s mother expressed her sincere thanks to Chinese doctors in a video filmed for the donation.

“I want to repay them. They cured my boy. I hope these masks can help them,?she said.

Cambodian Sinologist Munyrith Chea (second from right) brings the masks donated by 86 Cambodian families to China, Feb 5, 2020. [Photo by the Yundi Behavior and Health Center/provided to Chinaculture.org]

A parcel of carefully wrapped masks came from seven-year-old Ban Chunsocheata, who brought the donation with her mother after a 7-hour journey.

“It is Chinese doctors who saved my child,?the child’s mother said.

Many Cambodian families also cheered Chinese people on in the fight against the coronavirus outbreak through videos.

“We are very thankful to the Chinese doctors, as my child received pretty good treatment in the hospital in Yunnan. Sorry for this epidemic in China. We believe everything will become better,?one of the parents said. 

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2020-02-12 11:49:08
<![CDATA[Children choir of Northern Ireland dedicate song to China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/12/content_1475349.htm

Children of Millburn Primary School Choir from Northern Ireland joined together to perform a Chinese song, Let the World be Full of Love, dedicated to people in China suffering from the coronavirus outbreak.

The song, written by Chinese singer-songwriter Guo Feng, was released in 1986 and performed by over 100 Chinese stars to celebrate the International Year of Peace.

The Chinese-language choir at the school was organized by the Confucius Institute at Ulster University. 16 of the project's teachers are from Hubei province, where the coronavirus outbreak began. The choir consists of 30 students from ages 8 to 13.

The Confucius Institute at the Ulster University was established in 2011 to develop academic, cultural, economic and social ties between Northern Ireland and China.

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2020-02-12 09:40:57
<![CDATA[Argentine scholars send support to Chinese people]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/11/content_1475295.htm

Young Argentine scholars and sinologists have sent their support to the Chinese people in the battle against the novel coronavirus in a video message.

"I know that the Chinese government has taken a series of resolute measures to control the development of the epidemic. I hope that the Chinese people can overcome the epidemic soon," said Ignacio Villagran, director of the Argentina-China Study Center at the University of Buenos Aires. He attended the Visiting Program for Young Sinologists in the Northwestern Chinese city of Xi'an in 2017.

Gonzalo Tordini, chairman of the Argentina-China Association of Former Scholarship Recipients (ADEBAC), said, "As international students who studied and lived in China, we feel sympathetic to the difficulties facing the Chinese people caused by the new coronavirus." He added, "We know the strength of the Chinese people, so we believe that the situation will soon return to normal."

Dafne Esteso, vice-chairman of ADEBAC, said the Argentineans and the Chinese have a long and profound friendship. "We always stand by you."

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2020-02-11 15:03:13
<![CDATA[African artist cheers Chinese people with music]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/11/content_1475279.htm

The outbreak of the new coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV, requires attention, patience and assistance from all members of society. On Feb 9, African dancer Abbe Simon released a song he wrote giving good wishes and support for China.

"Here is a song I wrote for our lovely country China. Just to remind all of us we are victorious, and we will always be! Zhongguo Jia You! You're victorious! And we love you!" Simon said.

Simon, a former lead dancer for a well-known Cameroon hip-hop group, discovered not only inspiration but also a future in China.

In 2008, Simon founded his own dance group -- ABBE Dance -- in Cameroon. With his partner and wife Jiang Keyu, they combine modern dance, hip pop, African drum dance, Tai Chi and qigong techniques into a comprehensive training method.

Early in 2016 they built an art platform, BodyBoulevard, to teach Chinese children African drum and dance. The couple aims to promote African culture and build a bridge between China and Africa.

They have been invited to perform on international stages, including the Beijing Olympics and the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation.

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2020-02-11 14:04:59
<![CDATA[Belgian pianist composes song in solidarity with China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/11/content_1475259.htm

Video source: People's Daily Online

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2020-02-11 09:50:40
<![CDATA[Colombian ambassador extends support to China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/10/content_1475212.htm

Luis D. Monsalve, Colombian ambassador to China, spoke on behalf of the Colombian people, offering support to China in this challenging time.

He expressed great admiration and appreciation toward the doctors, nurses and workers in the virus-stricken region, who have continued to work in such difficult circumstances.

The video was provided by the Colombian Embassy in China.

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2020-02-10 13:31:18
<![CDATA[Thailand enterprise cheers Chinese people in fight against coronavirus]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/10/content_1475198.htm

Seacon Square Group donated about 7,000 disposable masks to China through the China Cultural Center in Bangkok on Feb 7.

Representatives from the China Cultural Center in Bangkok and Seacon Square Group at the donation ceremony in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb 7, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

The group representative expressed his condolences to the infected people who died from the disease and wishes the Chinese people conquer the epidemic soon.

Banner in Chinese supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus was featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Banners in both Chinese and Thai supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus were featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall.

Banners in both Chinese and Thai supporting Chinese people in fight against the virus were featured on LED screens of the Seacon Square, the group’s mall. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Seacon Square Group is a partner of the center, participating in a 20-day show and sales to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the People’s Republic of China. 

Gu Hongxing (right), director of the China Cultural Center in Bangkok at the donation ceremony in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb 7, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-02-10 11:50:50
<![CDATA[Former Colombian president supports Chinese people in fight against epidemic]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/08/content_1475152.htm

I am former Colombian President Sampel Pisano, a friend of the Chinese people. I give my sincere greetings to the entire Chinese people who are suffering from the epidemic.

Like all stubborn viruses, no matter how difficult, it will eventually be wiped out. Despite the hardships which China has been through in the past, it won and was reborn fresh and new. This time China will win the battle against the virus, too.

The Colombian people are standing closely with their Chinese friends. I'm sure when I visit China next, I will toast and celebrate the virus being defeated completely!

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2020-02-08 16:20:56
<![CDATA[Thailand supports China in fight against virus]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/08/content_1475144.htm

Thai Tourism and Sports Minister Phiphat Ratchakitprakarn expressed his support to the Chinese people in the fight against the novel coronavirus in a video message. "The Thai people always stand by you." He said he hopes the Chinese people could overcome the disease as soon as possible.

In this video, Thai people from different walks of life also send well-wishes.

 

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2020-02-08 09:01:04
<![CDATA[Sinologists around world send support for virus battle]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/07/content_1475130.htm

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus brings together all Chinese, and also people's hearts around the globe. In Egypt, Spain, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia, Australia and many other countries, they pay close attention to the epidemic control, ask after Chinese friends, and donate money and goods to those in dire need.

Recently, diplomats, Sinologists and scholars from overseas expressed their warm regards and support toward people in Wuhan, and other parts around China, through the Chinese Culture Translation and Studies Support Network (CCTSS).

The video was provided by CCTSS.

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2020-02-07 14:20:09
<![CDATA[Young Columbian Sinologist makes video to support virus fight]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/07/content_1475117.htm                          

Young Columbian Sinologist David Castrillón sent his video supporting China in combating the novel coronavirus. He was once involved in the Visiting Program for Young Sinologists started by China’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism, which aims to build a global platform for young Sinologists overseas to conduct research on China.

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2020-02-07 11:21:09
<![CDATA[Intl kids' theater artists make videos to support fight against virus]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/06/content_1475079.htm

Within 48 hours, 61 artists from 13 countries sent their videos supporting China’s ongoing campaign to fight the novel coronavirus via their Chinese partner ?ASK, a Shanghai-based international theater presenter committed to introducing international theater productions for young audiences to China.

Most of the artists showed in their videos the slogan: “Stay strong! We are with you, China!?/p>

ASK planned to introduce top-notch performances to a special venue at the Tianjin Grand Theater since this February, but this had to be postponed due to the outbreak of the epidemic.

The artists have shown strong confidence in China as well as Tianjin in their efforts to combat the virus.

Within the video, Yvette Hardie, president of Assitej, the International Association of Theater for Children and Young People affiliated to UNESCO, took the initiative in responding to the campaign, joined by a large group of artists from leading theater organizations around the world, including the Edinburgh Children’s Festival and Australian Windmill Theater, to name a few.

Shona Reppe, who starred in The Curious Scrapbook of Josephine Bean, a top children’s drama from Britain, said she expects the outbreak of the epidemic will soon be overcome and she is keen to come to China.

Ian Cameron, 73, who started White, also an internationally acclaimed classical piece from Britain, said: “My heart is with you, China.?/p>

Helene Ducharme, director ofElisapee and the Northern Lightsfrom the Canadian troupe Motus, led a group of local friends to shoot the video while she was doing a co-production in Africa, using different languages to encourage China’s efforts to combat the virus.

Tony Mack, chairman of Slingsby, an Australian performance troupe which is renowned for its Emil and the Detectives, said: “The medical workers: You are heroes. Thank you so much for standing on the front line, and you are not only keeping China safe but also the whole world safe!?/p>

The ASK team said it will remain positive and active in connecting with audiences and followers by spreading online content to enhance energy, courage and creativity.

In the past five years, up to 5,500 performances from 19 countries have been introduced across China through 12 ASK studio theaters and its cooperative venues nationwide.

Li Wenyu, general manager of Tianjin Grand Theater, said: “With government subsidies, the theater has introduced high-level international art performance for local citizens and in the future, I will partner with ASK to introduce more children’s theaters.?/p>

 

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2020-02-06 11:07:24
<![CDATA[Mexican children imagine the wonders of China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1475077.htm ]]> 2020-01-31 09:00:00 <![CDATA[The snow kingdom in NE China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/04/content_1475075.htm

A warm welcome from a cold land: Check out China's snow kingdom...

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2020-02-04 09:00:00
<![CDATA[Mauritius President hopeful for more cultural exchange with China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/06/content_1475027.htm

President Prithvirajsing Roopun of Mauritius gives a speech at the welcome and farewell party on Jan 31, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Mauritius President Prithvirajsing Roopun attended a party to welcome the new director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius on Jan 31.

“Thanks to support from the Chinese and Mauritius governments and China Embassy to Mauritius, mutual understanding between the two nations was deepened through a series of cultural exchange events, including Chinese Film Week, Happy Chinese New Year, Dragon Festival and Mid-Autumn Festival celebrations,?Roopun said.

He said many impressive cultural activities were held by the center over the past four years. Cultural exchange will be brought to a higher level with effort from the two governments, he added.

As Zhang Xinhong took office as the new director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius, an event was held to welcome his arrival and bid farewell to his predecessor Song Yanqun. Chinese Ambassador to Mauritius Li Miaoguang and about 300 guests, students from the center and local representatives from the Mauritius Chinese Association attended the party.


Song Yanqun, left, former director of the China Cultural Center in Mauritius, and Mauritius president Prithvirajsing Roopun on Jan 31, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-06 14:14:54
<![CDATA[Dream collection on show]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/04/content_1475019.htm

A Qing Dynasty painting Grand View Garden is on show.[Photo provided to China Daily]

An exhibition examining the cultural legacy of Cao Xueqin's literary masterwork Dream of the Red Chamber is now available at the National Museum of China website, Lin Qi reports.

Adaptations of works of intellectual property, such as online literature, that have been made into movies and drama series, are sweeping Chinese mass media and proving lucrative.

Yet creating successful IP products is not the monopoly of modern artists. More than 250 years ago, in suburban Beijing, a man named Cao Xueqin made one such work which has endured for centuries-despite never having benefited from its success.

Cao, who was plagued by destitution and illness, authored a semi-autobiographical novel titled Dream of the Red Chamber. In the work he drew on the rise and fall of his own once well-connected family to describe the tragedy of an extended feudal family surnamed Jia.

He first circulated copies of the manuscript among his friends, who were touched not only by the downfall of the Jia clan, but also by the distressing love story between the two main characters, Jia Baoyu and Lin Daiyu. People were also caught up by the hypocrisy and cruelty of the upper classes, which exposed the worsening social crisis in 18th-century China.

Sadly, Cao died of grief in 1763 soon after his only son's death. He was unable to see his work make it to print. The first edition of which was published in 1791 earned him the respect of literary aficionados and casual readers, alike.

Today, Dream of the Red Chamber is acknowledged as one of the pinnacles of Chinese literature. It offers an encyclopedic understanding of Chinese art and culture, including poetry, music, operas, folk customs, handicrafts, architecture and gastronomy.

This work of fiction still enjoys a wide readership both at home and abroad, where it has been translated into more than 100 languages. It also prompted the development of a field of exclusive study known as Redology.


A painting on display.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Opened in December at the National Museum of China, an exhibition titled The Sole Pinnacle and an Immortal Masterpiece pays tribute to Cao and his only known literary work.

A selection of editions of Dream of the Red Chamber published during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) are on display at the show, alongside related artifacts that reflect the social context in which Cao lived and wrote.

Suspended on Jan 25 amid the growing coronavirus outbreak, the exhibition can still be visited online.

The exhibition also gathers together a range of adaptations and other works inspired by Dream of the Red Chamber, a time-honored work that remains more popular than any other piece of Chinese literature.

Bai Yuntao, deputy director of the National Museum of China and exhibition curator, says, "Dream of the Red Chamber is recognized as the epitome of Chinese culture and history, embodying aesthetic values in terms of poetry, music, architecture and other forms of art. It is also considered a literary peak difficult to be exceeded in terms of quality and influence.

"Ever since its birth, the novel has garnered a myriad of praise."

He says the exhibition's title is taken from a commentary by Liang Qichao, a noted historian, philosopher and politician who lived during the late 19th century and early 20th century.

Liang said, "When talking about Chinese novels, Dream of the Red Chamber is the sole pinnacle and an immortal masterpiece that makes other works not worth mentioning."

"Liang spoke highly of the work, although his opinions sound a little too assertive," Bai says.

Liang commented in another article that, "People who read Dream of the Red Chamber always feel a lingering attachment to it, or a sadness caused by it."

Bai says the selection of documents and artifacts related to Cao and Dream of the Red Chamber have been drawn from the collections of a dozen museums, libraries and other cultural institutions from around the country.


A Qing-era edition of Dream of the Red Chamber with illustrations on show.[Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

He Weiguo, executive secretary-general of the Society of Dream of the Red Chamber in Beijing, says the last, similarly grand celebration of this masterpiece was in 1963, when an exhibition was held at the Palace Museum to mark the 200th anniversary of Cao's death.

He says with its unprecedented solemnity and scale, the exhibition in 1963 introduced the historical context in which Dream of the Red Chamber was born, presented several editions of the work and charted the development of Redology and presented other relevant artifacts, as well as Cao's biography.

He says the 1963 show not only honored the memory of Cao, but also offered an insight into the cultural depths of the novel and its influence. He adds that the exhibition will only serve to further deepen study and interest in the novel, and as many members of his society were involved in organizing the exhibition, they plan to give talks about their latest academic findings.

The ongoing exhibition also includes new editions of the novel and related documents and objects of historic value which have emerged ever since the 1963 show.

For example, a refined and detailed album of 230 paintings, which narrates the story of Dream of the Red Chamber and took the 19th-century painter Sun Wen some 36 years to complete, is also on display at the show. It was rediscovered in the collection of Lyushun Museum in Dalian, Liaoning province, in 2004 and reintroduced to scholars of Redology.

As well as the new academic depths it achieves, the exhibition will also present a carnival for Dream of the Red Chamber aficionados where they will be amazed by all kinds of peripheral collectibles that have been produced to exemplify the novel's far-reaching influence.

The eye-catching objects on show include colorful yuefenpai calendar posters and commodity posters, popular during the first half of the 20th century, which depict scenarios of Dream of the Red Chamber and mostly feature leading figures of the time such as Jia Baoyu, Lin Daiyu and Xue Baochai.

One poster shows Baoyu and Daiyu visiting Miaoyu, another main character who was a Buddhist nun who also resides at Daguanyuan, or Grand View Garden, which provides the setting for much of the story.


A set of traditional pastries, inspired by a Qing painting titled Feast at Yihong Courtyard, is on offer to visitors.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Interestingly, instead of treating her guests with quality tea as it is described in the novel, Miaoyu presents a bottle of the cocoa that the poster advertised.

Dream of the Red Chamber has long been one of the most adapted pieces of Chinese literature. For example, Peking Opera arias based on the novel's plot and sung by the late master artist Mei Lanfang also became classics.

The exhibition displays two black-and-white photos, both from the collection of the Chinese National Academy of Arts, one showing Mei portraying Daiyu in an opera-film titled Daiyu Buries the Flowers from 1924, and another in which he played Qingwen in a play titled Qingwen Tears the Fan in 1916, both noted scenarios from the novel.

Several video screens are also installed at the exhibition where visitors can choose from some 36 films, dramas, operas and folk tunes inspired by the novel, ranging from a 1944 film in which Zhou Xuan, the iconic singer and actress, portrays Daiyu, to a performance of the work given by the San Francisco Opera in 2017.

Specially created for the exhibition, a set of traditional Chinese guozi pastries which contain eight types of filling will be offered at stands in the museum and in its cafe, when the show reopens to the public in the future. The National Museum of China will remain closed until further notice.

The cakes resemble eight flowers that appear in a 2.3 meter-long Qing-era painting in the National Museum's collection which is also on display at the current exhibition.

The painting, titled Feast at Yihong Courtyard, depicts a vivid scene from the novel in which a dozen of principal female characters gather at a night gala to celebrate Baoyu's birthday at his residence, Yihong Courtyard.

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2020-02-04 08:26:33
<![CDATA[Artwork by children offers inspiring message to fight virus]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/06/content_1474988.htm

[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, the 2020 spring semester for Chinese schools has been postponed. But students can still continue their studies in various ways while staying at home.

Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.

Fuelled by imagination and creativity, these artworks display warmth as well as strength. The messages delivered by the kids are multifaceted. We can feel their determination that the epidemic will be soon be defeated, we can also see their admiration and gratitude for all the medical workers, who play a vital role in this battle.


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]


Children who are members of the youth palace of Beijing's Dongcheng district managed to create dozens of paintings and posters to convey their attitude towards the fight against virus.[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

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2020-02-06 09:27:34
<![CDATA[Local art form aims to raise awareness]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/06/content_1474986.htm

A bird's-eye view of the cultural auditorium at Dong'ao village, Caocun township in Ruian, Zhejiang province.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Auditoriums for cultural activities are bringing people together, Xu Xiaodan, Ma Zhenhuan and Qin Jirong report from Wenzhou, Zhejiang province.

Many auditoriums in Zhejiang province, constructed in recent years to host cultural programs, have turned into places from where locals are helping the fight against the novel coronavirus.

In Wenzhou, a city in Zhejiang with more than 300 confirmed cases of infection as of Wednesday, the management team of the local cultural auditorium is coordinating efforts of officials, rural residents and volunteers in disease control and prevention.


The main hall and stage at the auditorium.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Dozens of teams were formed within few days to post notices on bulletin boards of auditoriums, tell villagers about the dos and don'ts during the period, register people from Hubei, distribute face masks and control the entry and exit of vehicles and individuals.

"I get more than 300 phone calls every day. We are trying our best to curb the spread of the virus on our island," says Huang Jianfeng, a volunteer from Ximen in Yueqing, a county-level city in Wenzhou, which reported 75 confirmed cases of infection as of Sunday.

Meanwhile, guci, a ballad, and slogans are being used to alert senior villagers to the epidemic. Chen Dehua, who is in charge of the cultural auditorium in Huling town of Ruian, another county-level city in Wenzhou, composed lyrics about preventive measures for a guci show on Jan 26 to increase awareness among the elderly. The ballad, titled Health is a Blessing, is now played by the broadcasting stations in Ruian.


A library inside the auditorium in Dong'ao village.[Photo provided to China Daily]

People in rural areas of China didn't have modern facilities to enjoy cultural activities and there were not many proper venues to mobilize people in public events such as healthcare campaigns in the past before the auditoriums were built.

Zhejiang, an economic powerhouse in East China, began to build cultural auditoriums in 2013, when the per capita net income of farmers in the province had secured the top place nationwide yet again. The provincial government began to pay attention to the cultural life of rural residents as daily public requirements became broader.

In the same year, the province launched a drive to build cultural auditoriums in Zhejiang's villages and included it in the "10 must-do things for the people". In 2019, the province had 3,282 new cultural auditoriums and by the end of last year, the number had crossed 14,300. Aimed at showcasing local culture, most such venues were constructed in accordance with local conditions. They are not just grand halls for performances or meetings but also bases for diverse activities.


Xihe Cultural Auditorium in Tangxia township, Ruian, Zhejiang province, organizes volunteers to participate in the fight against the epidemic caused by the novel coronavirus on Jan 30.

Yangzhai village in Wenzhou's Ouhai district is a cradle of guci. Since a cultural auditorium was built there in 2013, the art form has been regenerated through better inheritance and development. Every month, there are four guci performances staged in the auditorium, attracting hundreds from the village and its neighboring areas to gather at the 1,800-square-meter hall, Jiang Yuzhou, Party chief of Yangzhai, says.

"The older generations in Wenzhou have a deep affection for traditional folk art," he tells China Daily."We hope to provide entertainment for the elderly, and also promote guci culture among young generations via activities in the auditorium."

Many overseas Chinese have roots in Yangzhai and are fond of guci, which Jiang says will help in its inheritance and development.


A staff worker puts up notices about epidemic prevention on the bulletin board of a cultural auditorium in Ruian on Feb 1.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Zishang village in Wenzhou, just 4 kilometers away from Yangzhai, has more than 3,000 villagers working and living abroad nowadays. Some of them are overseas migrants, and some are working or living there temporarily. Foreign influence is seen in the village's auditorium that was constructed in 2017, such as a Western restaurant and an exhibition and sales room for imported goods. There were many vacant houses due to villagers moving out, Jin Yongyong, Party secretary of Zishang, says.

After the completion of the auditorium, he drew a blueprint of a modern complex for culture, tourism and entertainment with the auditorium at the center, and made a plan to attract business and investment. With the support of overseas Chinese, with origins in the village, tourism resources, including a flower field, a restaurant and a Westernstyle street began to spring up in Zishang, and the auditorium has been given a new role-the service center for tourists.

Jin says in future he plans to apply advanced technologies such as 5G and facial recognition in the village's management and operation in a bid to build Zishang into a "modern village with international hues".


A team of workers organized by local cultural auditorium in Yuecheng subdistrict in Yueqing, Zhejiang province, check epidemic prevention in a local household on Jan 26.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Seeing how cultural auditoriums are changing their daily life, people in Zhejiang have shown a growing zeal for public affairs and a stronger sense of belonging.

Hou Yuexiang is one of the volunteers in Qingnianfang community of Wenzhou. Besides offering care and love to neighbors through voluntary services, the 70-year-old and her 85 peers make up a team in charge of the daily management of the community's cultural auditorium.

"The auditorium, along with a library and a gym, were built for us and the activities enrich our cultural life," says Hou," which makes it necessary to ensure the orderly operation of these facilities by ourselves."

She adds: "As a volunteer, I am so glad to see that people from the community, young and old, appreciate and enjoy our services in the auditorium."

Chen Chaonan, a resident of Nan'ao village in Ruian, says she and her children are frequent visitors to the local cultural auditorium. "People of all ages are able to have fun there due to the multiple choices for entertainment, including chess games, toys, books and fitness equipment."

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2020-02-06 08:23:30
<![CDATA[Spanish vlogger speaks out for China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/06/content_1474984.htm

A Spanish vlogger refuted false views on the coronavirus outbreak, denouncing malicious actions taken by internet users abroad and those who are profiting from stirring unnecessary fear among the public.

In a video released by Noel Sirerol on Feb 1, who goes by the web username Noel.Sunuoyi on Chinese social media, Sirerol slashed ill-willed comments, adding they were misguided by false information.

Video by Noel.Sunuoyi. 

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2020-02-06 10:06:36
<![CDATA[Eradicate the prejudice - I am not a virus, I am a human]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/05/content_1474921.htm

A heartwarming scene was recently seen on the streets of Florence, Italy. A Chinese Italian who wore a face mask, with a placard reading "I am not a virus, I am a human" at his side, met with enthusiastic hugs of passers-by that showed no fear of the novel coronavirus which has been spreading in China.

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2020-02-05 11:57:47
<![CDATA['Festive China': 24 Solar Terms]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/04/content_1474844.htm

The traditional Chinese lunar calendar divides the year into 24 solar terms. More than 2,000 years ago, ancient Chinese people created this overall framework to mark the annual passage of time based on observations of the sun's motion. Nowadays, the 24 solar termsnot only apply to farming, but also guide Chinese people in everyday life.

In 2016, the 24 solar terms were included in UNESCO's Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips that focus on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes, and how they are manifested in today's China.

Festive China: Spring Festival

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2020-02-04 09:58:49
<![CDATA['Susu' China! Stay strong Wuhan!]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-02/04/content_1474849.htm                                

The 2020 Happy Chinese New Year program in Thailand generates positive energy, and the people of the world send blessings to China. On Feb 2, at the 2020 Happy Chinese New Year celebration at Nai Lert Park in Bangkok, where people were experiencing Chinese culture, individuals from all over the world rooted for those in China fighting against the epidemic.

In every corner of Nai Lert Park in Bangkok, where the Chinese cultural atmosphere prevailed, people could always hear the Thai expression susu, which means jiayou, or stay strong!

The 2020 Happy Chinese New Year at Nai Lert Park in Bangkok is the first time that Thailand's well-known Nai Lert Flower and Garden Art Fair has worked with the Happy Chinese New Year program. Under the support and guidance of the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, the Chinese Embassy in Thailand and the Shanghai Municipal Administration of Culture and Tourism, the event was carried out by Shanghai Oriental Pearl International Communication Co Ltd. The activities included a traditional Chinese lantern show, cultural exhibition and workshops such as painting Peking Opera masks and making Spring Festival lanterns.

In light of the current situation, the work plan of the event was adjusted in time. The Chinese and Thai sides worked together to ensure that the event was successfully held from Jan 30 to Feb 2.

Launched in 1986, covering an area of 3.2 hectares, the Nai Lert Flower and Garden Art Fair exhibited the largest flower carpet in Southeast Asia with Chinese cultural elements this year.

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2020-02-04 11:27:28
<![CDATA[Visits from China to UK hit new record in 2019]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474740.htm

The University of Cambridge has become a popular tourism destination for Chinese people. [Photo by Tan Xi/For China Daily]

 

A record number of visits from China to Britain were recorded in the nine months to September 2019, according to new official figures from the British tourist authority.

VisitBritain said there were 321,000 visits from China during the nine-month period, up 8 percent on the same period in 2018. Visitors from China spent 553 million pounds (722.9 million U.S. dollars) during this period, up 11 percent compared with 2018.

New figures released by the Office for National Statistics show it was a record October for inbound tourism spending in Britain. Visitors spent 2.3 billion pounds (3 billion dollars) in Britain in October 2019, the highest ever for the month of October.

The statistics also show that it was a record-breaking August-to-October period in 2019 for both overseas visits to Britain and for visitor spending. August 2019 was the highest month ever for both inbound visits and spending and only the third time ever to break the four million mark for inbound visits to Britain in a single month.

According to VisitBritain, tourism is worth 127 billion pounds (166 billion dollars) to the British economy and the number of overseas visits to Britain is forecast to rise in 2020 to 39.7 million, the highest ever.

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2020-01-31 15:17:52
<![CDATA[Museum preserves old sounds of Beijing]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474739.htm

Shijia Hutong Museum is a popular attraction for visitors from home and abroad. [Photo provided to China Daily]

 

Street hawkers and vendors calling out their wares, chirping cicadas and pigeon whistles... the lost sounds of traditional Beijing life can still be found in a museum.

By touching a screen in a small room in the Shijia Hutong Museum, visitors can hear more than 300 sounds of old Beijing, which are gradually falling silent due to the rapid development of the modern city.

"Sharpen scissors and knives!" "Deliver goods to your doorstep! Blush, fragrant powder and embroidery needles!" Most of the sounds in the museum are hawkers' cries.

"Families living in hutongs used to buy most of their life necessities from peddlers traveling through streets and lanes," said Colin Siyuan Chinnery, the initiator of the sound project.

Before the advent of supermarkets and convenience stores, merchants roamed the hutongs, the city's labyrinth of traditional alleys, delivering goods and services to people's doorsteps. Each of them had a unique noisemaker or hawker's cry to announce their arrival.

"The peddling is loud but has a nice rhythm to it. I can feel people's humor, optimism and energy," said Li Ruting, a 28-year-old female traveler to Beijing from the southern Chinese city of Nanning.

Old Beijing was a city of distinctive sounds. For visitors like Li, the museum recreates the city's past life.

Wang Lin, 26, came from the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou. He was shocked when he learned that camels used to be the main vehicles carrying coal, silk, rice and other life necessities in Beijing 70 years ago.

"I didn't believe it until I heard the camel bells in the museum," Wang said. "It must have been fascinating for people to see camels in their daily life."

"Most sounds of old Beijing are gone. That's why I want to record it. Old sound can still evoke people's memories," Chinnery said.

As an artist living in China, 48-year-old Chinnery started the sound project in 2013 when the government of Dongcheng District sought his opinion to turn the old house of his grandmother into a museum.

Majoring in Chinese culture at the University of London, Chinnery has spent many years working in the British Library on a project of Dunhuang, an important component of the Silk Road culture.

As a child, Chinnery used to live in Beijing and learned kungfu. In 2002, Chinnery decided to go back to Beijing.

When he lived in Beijing as a child, the sound of pigeon whistles made a deep impression on him.

"Beijingers attach a whistle to their pigeons. When the pigeons fly, the sound of the whistle rings. I've never seen that in other countries," he said.

However, fewer and fewer pigeons with whistles can be found nowadays. Chinnery is developing a database of different sounds that were once heard in the old alleyways.

It took him a long time to find a 94-year-old former street hawker and record his shouts to advertise his goods and services. To recreate the original sound of camel bells, Chinnery went all the way to the desert and recorded the sound of camels there.

"Sounds can deliver messages about culture, history and personal feelings. I hope more people can join me to preserve the vanishing sounds of Beijing and share their memories of sounds," Chinnery said.

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2020-01-31 14:54:38
<![CDATA[New York Philharmonic celebrates Year of the Rat with annual concert]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474738.htm

Musicians perform Gift during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat.

Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen.

The event also marked Zhang's Philharmonic debut. As the Gold Medalist of the 2009 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, Zhang studied under American classical pianist Gary Graffman, who was the soloist for the New York Philharmonic's performance of Rhapsody in Blue on the soundtrack of Woody Allen's 1979 film Manhattan.

The virtuoso performance given by the young pianist won a standing ovation from over 2,700 people at the David Geffen Hall. Many of them were New Yorkers who grew up listening to the piece, which as a composition for solo piano and jazz band premiered in New York in 1924.

During a meeting with local press on Monday, the Shanghai-born pianist described the concert's program as a beautiful musical exchange between China and the United States.

"I think the Chinese traditional music and the American jazz are as remote as you could get in terms of artistic aesthetics," said Zhang.

With a program in which a Chinese pianist gets to play The Rhapsody in Blue and an American violinist plays The Butterfly Lovers, "it really made a statement of what musicians are trying to do with music in cultural exchange," he added.

Shaham, one of the most acclaimed violinists in the world, recorded The Butterfly Lovers with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra in 2007.

His performance on Friday night demonstrated his special connection with the classic piece, with an interpretation that blended both Chinese and Western music styles.

The concert also marked the U.S. premiere of China-born composer Zhou Tian's Gift, and the New York premiere of Korean composer Texu Kim's Spin-Flip.

The Philharmonic was under the baton of world-renowned Chinese conductor Yu Long, who has conducted a highly acclaimed list of orchestras throughout the world, including New York, Los Angeles, Munich, and Tokyo philharmonic orchestras.

Currently vice president of the Chinese Musicians Association and artistic director and chief conductor of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, Yu collaborates frequently with many of the world's most celebrated soloists, such as Lang Lang, Yo-Yo Ma, and Wang Yujia.

The New York Philharmonic has welcomed the Lunar New Year with an annual celebration since 2012. This year's Lunar New Year fell on Jan. 25.


Chinese conductor Yu Long conducts The Butterfly Lovers with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


Musicians perform Spin-Flip during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


American violinist Gil Shaham (C) performs The Butterfly Lovers with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]


Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen (Front) performs Rhapsody in Blue with the orchestra during a Lunar New Year Concert by New York Philharmonic in New York, the United States, Jan. 28, 2020. The New York Philharmonic presented its ninth annual Lunar New Year Concert on Tuesday night with celebrated and emerging artists to ring in the Year of the Rat. Featuring famous musical pieces from America and Asia, the program included a violin concerto The Butterfly Lovers with American violinist Gil Shaham as soloist, and George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue with 29-year-old Chinese pianist Zhang Haochen. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 14:42:18
<![CDATA[Exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" held in Lisbon, Portugal]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474737.htm

People visit the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


A visitor views artworks at the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


People view a painting at the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the exhibition "Picasso. Universal Master" in Lisbon, Portugal, on Jan. 28, 2020. The exhibition, which runs from Jan. 25 to April 30, shows a selection of works that expresses the numerous connections Pablo Picasso establishes between ceramics, drawing and printmaking. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 14:26:08
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474736.htm

A female artist of Shanghai Chinese Orchestra performs "Landscape around the Lake" via Chinese flute during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dragon dancers of Zhejiang Shaoju Opera Theatre perform "Grand Bustling Chinese New Year" during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


An actress of Zhejiang Shaoju Opera Theatre performs during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]


Actors of of Shanghai Chinese Orchestra wave to audience after performances during the Chinese New Year celebration concert held in Chicago Symphony Center in Chicago, the United States, on Jan. 26, 2020. The sound of traditional Chinese musical instruments and Shaoju Opera filled the Symphony Center in downtown Chicago Sunday afternoon, as the Chinese New Year concert entertained an audience of more than 1,000. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:41:12
<![CDATA[Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations held in Los Angeles]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474735.htm

Lion dancers perform during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A performer interacts with a girl during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Spectators watch traditional Chinese martial arts during Chinese Lunar New Year celebrations at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles, the United States, Jan. 26, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:19:20
<![CDATA[Brooklyn Nets hosts Chinese culture night in New York]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474734.htm

Traditional Chinese lion dancing is performed during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

The Brooklyn Nets hosted Chinese culture night on Jan 29 at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City.

To celebrate the Year of the Mouse, the team wore Lunar New Year pregame shooting shirts and its starting lineups were announced in Chinese. Videos of players saying internet buzzwords in Chinese won rounds of applause from the audience.

Traditional Chinese lion dancing and fan dancing were performed at breaks during the game between the Brooklyn Nets and the Detroit Pistons.

Fans could also have their names written in custom Chinese calligraphy and receive a sampling of rice cake desserts.

In addition to the traditional Chinese cultural performances, the evening's celebration also included more modern elements to meet the taste of the young people, said Joe Tsai, owner of the Brooklyn Nets.

Well-known Asian American rapper MC Jin performed at halftime and wished everyone happy Chinese New Year in both Cantonese and English. The evening also featured unique dance routines from the Brooklynettes and TAKALA LAND, a Chinese kids hip-hop dance team.


Dancers perform during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dancers perform during the Chinese culture night hosted by Brooklyn Nets at the team's home arena Barclays Center in New York City, the United States, Jan. 29, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 12:07:49
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year Concert held in Lithuanian capital]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474733.htm

People watch a Chinese New Year concert performed by China's Heilongjiang Art Troupe at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town of Vilnius, Lithuania, Jan. 28, 2020. Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival.

Held at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town, the concert attracted an audience of more than 300, including First Deputy Chancellor Deividas Matulionis and head of the Group for Inter-Parliamentary Relations with China Kestutis Glaveckas.

In his opening speech, Chinese Ambassador to Lithuania Shen Zhifei talked about China's current fight against the outbreak of pneumonia caused by the novel coronavirus, saying "We hope that the international community has full confidence in the firm determination and competent ability of the Chinese government and people in dealing with the epidemic."

He also expressed his heartfelt gratitude to the Lithuanian government and people as well as the international community for their sympathy, understanding and support towards the Chinese people.

With the show in Vilnius as the last stop, the troupe kicked off its tour on Jan. 24 with six performances in Latvia and one in Lithuania.


People watch a Chinese New Year concert performed by China's Heilongjiang Art Troupe at Vilnius Town Hall in the Old Town of Vilnius, Lithuania, Jan. 28, 2020. Folk musicians of Heilongjiang Art Troupe from China staged a concert in Lithuanian capital Tuesday night to celebrate Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-31 11:42:07
<![CDATA[Flagship designs land ashore]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474732.htm

A building block model of the Shandong is unveiled on Jan 7 in Beijing. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The creative team that contributed to the logo and emblem of China's first home-built aircraft carrier has launched a range of products aimed at young consumers, Li Yingxue reports.

China's first fully homegrown aircraft carrier, the CNS Shandong, was delivered to the People's Liberation Army Navy at a port in Sanya, South China's Hainan province, on Dec 17.

Two weeks later in Beijing, a series of cultural and creative souvenirs and products related to the launch of the warship were unveiled, from emblemed badges and baseball caps to detailed models of the Shandong.

Xie Dahuan, chief designer of China Shipbuilding Culture and Technology Co, was tasked with heading a team to create the new emblem and logo for the ship back in 2017, and to develop a range of ancillary products that would appeal to younger Chinese consumers.

The 12 designers who joined Xie's team were all born in the 1980s and '90s.

Xie spent many sleepless nights in the run-up to creating the first draft of designs, and over the past two and a half years, Xie's team submitted a total of 28 designs for the ship's emblem and logo.

"Even though the 28 versions seemed to change a lot, we were glad that the overall design direction didn't really alter much from our first draft," Xie says.

"Some of our designers have grown from knowing nothing about the military to being able to tell the difference between every fighter plane and aircraft carrier,"Xie says."We were all very touched the day the Shandong was delivered to the navy."

According to Xie, the composition of the emblem shows planes taking off from the aircraft carrier out at sea, and the emblem has been designed in such a way that it can be seen on three levels from different distances.

"If you see emblem from 5 meters away, it conveys the momentum of the navy. If you are looking at it from just one meter away, you can tell it's the Shandong. But if you study the emblem even more closely, you pick out all the details in the design," Xie explains.


Some block figures representing different roles on the aircraft carrier. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The water motif below the Chinese characters "PLA Navy Shandong" originates from a pattern used in porcelain found in Shandong province that dates back to ancient times.

"The reason we put the water pattern on a ribbon is that we want to show that, even though the PLA Navy has a short history of 70 years, it's still part of China's 5,000-year-old culture," Xie explains.

To make sure each line of the drawing of the aircraft carrier on the emblem is exactly the same as the Shandong, Xie's team visited the vessel around a dozen times.

Compared to the emblem, which is bold and steadfast, the logo looks younger, more modern and dynamic-the wings of the eagle hold up the deck of the aircraft carrier.

Born and raised in Neijiang, Sichuan province, Xie has been a military buff since childhood.

He still remembers the day he stepped onto the Shandong for the first time. "My mind went blank for the first 10 minutes, and in my trance, I seemed to meet my 10-year-old self who told me that my dream of working with the army had finally come true by designing the emblem for the Shandong.

"Over the past two years, I've witnessed the Shandong moving closer to perfection. It's such a large ship that you could easily get lost on it."

There was one time when Xie visited the Shandong, when it was moored alongside the CNS Liaoning, China's first aircraft carrier."They looked so fantastic together, and they made me feel really small," he recalls.

Having graduated from Beihang University with a major in industrial design, Xie designed the trophy for the Red Star Design Award.

As a designer, he keeps to the rule that each piece of work he designs should be a masterpiece."The designer should always create work that comes from the soul. Without soul, your work will become an orphan, but if you do it properly, it will always stay attached to you."


A poster that celebrates the Shandong's commissioning ceremony on Dec 17. [Photo/China Daily]

 

The Chinese blockbuster Operation Red Sea, which was released in February 2018, taking in 3.65 billion yuan ($530 million) at the box office, inspired Xie's team to project the image of the PLA Navy in a more cinematic way. "We thought to ourselves, 'why don't we design a range of cultural and creative products of the Shandong for the younger people?" Xie says.

Xie saw how good the navy soldiers on the Shandong looked in their uniform, so he wanted them to also look stylish off duty, and designed a baseball cap for them and fans of the Shandong to wear.

The baseball caps were developed by Capglobal, a company from Nantong, Jiangsu province, which is also one of the largest headwear manufacturers in the world.

The designers at Capglobal identified the characteristic Asian head shape and designed a special type of cap to fit Chinese people, a first for the company.

According to Xie, the cap is deeper than other models designed for the North American or European markets.

"The blue color of the cap is dyed twice so that it won't fade and will withstand temperatures that the soldiers onboard the Shandong will have to work in, which can be as low as-20 C or as high as 55 C," Xie says.

From caps to building blocks, Xie's team has designed a range of products related to the carrier, which are on sale at the Shandong Carrier Cultural and Creative online store on JD.


The emblem and logo of the Shandong. [Photo/China Daily]

 

"From the choice of fabrics for the caps to the detailing on the building blocks, each decision was made to present the quality of the 'made in China' brand," Xie says.

"In the future, we want to design new cultural and creative products about the Shandong so that people from different ages with different hobbies can get a feel for military culture."

Wang Yan, head of the China Institute of Marine Technology and Economy, says the design and release of the cultural and creative products of the Shandong will help to promote nautical and aeronautic culture in China.

The China State Shipbuilding Corp donated a selection of their products related to the Shandong to the Military Museum of the Chinese People's Revolution in Beijing on Jan 7.

He Qinglin, deputy chief designer of the Shandong, says that while his designs revolved more around engineering, Xie's designs were focused on art. He says the design of the Shandong's emblem and logo, and its cultural and creative products embrace the vitality of the ship.

"These cultural designs and products will help ordinary people to learn about China's first homegrown aircraft carrier," He says.


Xie Dahuan, chief designer of China Shipbuilding Culture and Technology Co, leads a team that helped to create the new emblem and logo for China's first fully homegrown aircraft carrier, the CNS Shandong. [Photo/China Daily]

 

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2020-01-31 11:21:20
<![CDATA[International students get in on festival fun]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474730.htm

Foreigners learn to make jiaozi dumplings, an essential part of a typical Chinese New Year feast, in Shanxi province. [Photo by Liang Shengren/For China Daily]

 

Activities organized to spread joy, enlightenment of China's biggest annual celebration, Yin Ruowei reports.

International students studying in North China's Shanxi province are being given a taste of the Spring Festival atmosphere this year, taking part in activities specially aimed at involving them in what the celebration is all about.

In the Shanxi city of Datong, a cultural activity inviting international students to get into the holiday spirit was held recently, attracting some 200 students from more than 50 countries to take part.

"This year is the third time we've held the event. We hope that students from overseas can be a part of the festive atmosphere in Shanxi, a province that is undergoing transformation and development," said Li Wenbin, a teacher with the school of international education and exchange at Taiyuan University of Technology.

On Lunar New Year's Eve, which fell on Jan 24, a group of international students went to Yangjiayao village in the southern suburbs of Datong to take part in a variety of festivities including a typical reunion dinner, a live gala, writing couplets and paper-cutting.

Student Devin Grace O'Sullivan from the United States thoroughly enjoyed the new experiences.

"It was a very interesting experience for me to celebrate Lunar New Year's Eve with local families. It's the most important day for family reunion in China," she said.


Shanxi's paper-cutting is among the world's intangible cultural heritage. [Photo by Ma Liming/For China Daily]

 

O'Sullivan visited families in the village, ate dumplings and gave out lucky red envelopes. She also learned some essential Spring Festival customs.

"I learned that getting a haircut would be considered as unlucky during the first month of Lunar New Year," she said.

Libyan Waled Yahya Mussa, who has studied in China for three years and is now a PhD student in mechanical engineering at TYUT, said the activity helped him connect more with Shanxi and China.

"I learned to make dumplings and cook them myself. During my stay here, I can eat fast with chopsticks and use vinegar with every meal," he said."The elderly are respected here. Shanxi people are very friendly and have helped me a lot."

Another city in the province, Pingyao, is encouraging tourists from home and abroad to take part in its Spring Festival celebrations.

David, a student originally from the US, said that Spring Festival decorations are rarely found in big cities, but in Pingyao cultural elements of the festival are everywhere.

"I used to celebrate Spring Festival in other parts of China and I found people use the holiday to spend time with relatives and friends, or to travel. But in Pingyao, there are many vibrant activities to choose from, including lion dancing, yangko dancing and guessing riddles."

Taylor, who has traveled with David around Shanxi, said: "Almost all places in Shanxi accept mobile payment services. And Shanxi has protected the environment well by controlling pollution over the years."

Li Yali and Wang Chaojun contributed to this story.


Foreign tourists take a photo in front of ancient walls in Pingyao, Shanxi province. [Photo by Sun Ruisheng/China Daily]

 

Overseas students studying at Taiyuan University of Technology spend their Spring Festival holiday in Pingyao. [Photo by Dou Huanqin/For China Daily]

 

Tourists from around the world join local residents to celebrate Chinese New Year in Pingyao, Shanxi province. [Photo by Sun Ruisheng/China Daily]


Residents perform a yangko dance in Lyuliang, Shanxi province. [Photo by Liu Liangliang/For China Daily]

 

Young performers join a festival parade in Lingshi county, Shanxi province. [Photo by Zhang Yijing and Duan Shoubao/For China Daily]

 

Villagers read chunlian, or spring couplets, in Shanxi. [Photo by Liu Liangliang/For China Daily]

 

An international light show is held in Datong, Shanxi province. [Photo/China Daily]

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2020-01-31 11:04:14
<![CDATA[Europe awash in red for Lunar New Year festivities]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/31/content_1474731.htm

Teenagers learn Chinese painting at a celebration of Chinese New Year in Riga, Latvia, on Saturday. [Photo/Xinhua]

The spacious lobby of Rosengarten, a conference center in downtown Mannheim, Germany, was decked out in Chinese red.

Crowds gathered in front of exhibit booths where folk artists from China's northwestern Shaanxi province showcased their skills of paper-cutting, woodblock printing and calligraphy.

Nine-year-old Anja was holding her calligraphy work that reads "Shu Nian Da Ji" ("Happy Year of the Rat").

"I've tried the tea ceremony, Go, and calligraphy. I will show this piece to my classmates and teachers at school," she said.

At a gala later that evening, Shaanxi artists entertained a local audience. It is a part of the Happy Chinese New Year cultural events taking place across the world but it was the first time the event was held in Germany's Frankfurt consular district.

This year's Spring Festival, or Chinese Lunar New Year, began on Jan 25. While residents from and around Mannheim had the chance to enjoy the culture and history of Shaanxi, people in Berlin welcomed an art troupe from Southwest China's Guizhou province. A gala featuring singing, dancing, and music offered the Berliners a glimpse of the musical traditions of ethnic minority groups living in Guizhou.

On Jan 15, for the ninth consecutive year, Berlin's historic Red Town Hall rolled out the red carpet and lit Chinese red lanterns for its Happy Chinese New Year gala.

Sawsan Chebli, state secretary for the Berlin city government, said that hosting Chinese New Year celebrations has become an important cultural tradition in Berlin. It also signifies the all-around cooperation between Berlin and China, and particularly between Berlin and its sister city, Beijing.

Addressing the opening ceremony of this year's gala in Berlin, Chinese Ambassador to Germany Wu Ken also stressed that cultural and tourism exchanges between the two countries play an increasingly crucial role in bringing people from two sides closer, and sound people-to-people ties lay the very foundation for bilateral relations.

In the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia, officials have made it a custom to record video messages addressed to the Chinese people living in the region ahead of the Spring Festival.

Andreas Pinkwart, the state's economic minister, said in this year's video that the Year of the Rat represents qualities of reliability and persistence, and the ability to turn the unfavorable situation into a favorable one.

"These are characteristics that we particularly need in today's times when the world trade system is facing growing challenges," he said.

Belgrade fairytale

Meanwhile, for people in Belgrade, Serbia, celebrating Chinese New Year with lights and fireworks in the city center is popular as well. On Jan 24, the countdown to Chinese New Year was staged at the Kalemegdan Park and Belgrade Fortress, where citizens gathered to enjoy the second Chinese Festival of Lights.

A fairytale world of colorful flowers, flamingos, chariot horsemen, Chinese dragons, lanterns and other light sculptures has been built in Belgrade and the city of Novi Sad. The event will last until mid-February.

Tasovac, a Belgrade resident, said he learned about the light exhibition from local media and enjoyed it very much.

"It was eye-opening," he said, "It was a great opportunity to allow us to feel the festivity of the Spring Festival here in Belgrade. I've always had an interest in Chinese culture."

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2020-01-31 08:53:29
<![CDATA[Boundless devotion to mural cause]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/29/content_1474701.htm

Lou Jiaben works on the mural "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" to restore the masterpiece's rich colors.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]

Last year, famous mural master Lou Jiaben was entrusted to restore the murals of the Yellow Crane Tower in Hubei province's Wuhan city and also work on new murals to replace those that have become weather-beaten. Lou, who is almost 80 years old, has devoted his career to murals, especially those of the Yellow Crane Tower since the 1980s.

In 1983, Lou undertook the mission to create grand murals on the fifth floor of the Yellow Crane Tower. During the period from 1984 to 1987, he dedicated himself to make the paintings vivid and magnificent. The paintings mainly demonstrate the culture and history of the Yellow Crane Tower, and also depict illustrations of the legend and poems about the tower. This time, through his persistence and hard work, the mural named "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" on the fifth floor of the tower has been brought back to its former glory.


Lou delicately applies red paint to the lips of a court lady playing a pipa, a four-stringed musical instrument.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou and his wife pose for a photo in front of the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Li Hui/For China Daily]


Reference samples for the murals are strewn across a work table, along with other art equipment.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


People attend the opening ceremony of the "Boundless River Flowing to the Sky's End" mural exhibit held on the fifth floor of the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou takes a look at mural repairs during the ongoing renovation work.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou and his assistant have takeout for lunch.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou speaks to guests at a work table crowded with an assortment of containers filled with colored pigments.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]


Lou looks at the mural while his two assistants rest behind him on scaffolding in the Yellow Crane Tower.[Photo by Zhu Xiyong/For China Daily]

 

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2020-01-29 10:28:47
<![CDATA[Chinese New Year celebrated across world]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/26/content_1474671.htm

People perform as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People perform a dragon dance as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A man performs traditional Chinese martial arts as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People dance as they celebrate the Chinese New Year in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the US, on Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Tokyo Skytree tower is lit in red for the Chinese New Year in Tokyo, Japan, Jan. 25, 2020. Tokyo Skytree tower is lit in red from Saturday to Monday celebrating the Chinese New Year which starts on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


People visit the market on the eve of the Chinese New Year in Singapore's Chinatown on Jan 24, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China pose for photos with guests after a performance held to mark the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the diplomatic relations between China and Colombia and to greet the Chinese New Year in Bogota, Colombia, Jan 24, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People watch fireworks during an activity greeting the Chinese New Year in Medan, Indonesia, Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Young people wearing Chinese traditional clothes participate in a fashion show during the Chinese New Year celebration in Malang, Indonesia. Jan 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Children decorate a giant panda statue in Lviv, Ukraine, Jan 23, 2020. A three-day celebration of the Chinese New Year kicked off in the western Ukrainian city of Lviv on Friday. A fair with traditional Chinese cuisine and souvenirs in the heart of the city, alongside panda statues which are to be decorated by local artists, are among this year's major attractions. [Photo/Xinhua]


A German girl dressed in traditional Han-style costumes attends a celebration event to greet the Chinese New Year in Mannheim, Germany, Jan 23, 2020. Under the title "The Shine of Shaanxi", a week-long event series brought by artists from Northwest China's Shaanxi province is part of the "Happy Chinese New Year" cultural event taking place across the world. [Photo/Xinhua]


People attend a celebration event to greet the Chinese New Year at South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa, California, the US, Jan 23, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-26 16:47:02
<![CDATA[Spring festival celebrated in Maritime Museum in London]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/26/content_1474657.htm

Jan 25, National Maritime Museum hosted a series of Chinese Spring Festival activities with songs and dances brought by local Chinese community and the Guizhou Song and Dance Ensemble. Check out the celebration ?there is more than just lion dances.

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2020-01-26 03:24:56
<![CDATA[Concert hall celebrates New Year with a variety of shows]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474560.htm

A Chinese percussion concert will be staged on Feb 2 at the Forbidden City Concert Hall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Forbidden City Concert Hall will hold a series of shows to celebrate the upcoming Spring Festival, or Chinese lunar New Year.

Highlights will include a performance by Peking Opera artists from the Jingju Theater Company of Beijing, including Chi Xiaoqiu, Hu Wenge and Li Hongtu. They will sing classic Peking Opera pieces on Jan 25.

Pipa player Wu Yuxia will team up with erhu player Song Fei to give a show of traditional Chinese folk songs on Jan 28.

Xiangsheng, or cross-talk, is a main attraction for audiences during the traditional Chinese festival. Veteran and new xiangsheng performers will join together to present a show on Jan 29 and 30.


Peking Opera singer Chi Xiaoqiu from Jingju Theater Company of Beijing will perform at the Forbidden City Concert Hall during the Chinese New Year holiday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Peking Opera singer Li Hongtu from Jingju Theater Company of Beijing will perform at the Forbidden City Concert Hall during the Chinese New Year holiday. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


A Peking Opera interpretation of episodes from modern Chinese drama Sishi Tongtang, or Four Generations under One Roof, will be staged on Jan 25 at the Forbidden City Concert Hall. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-22 17:58:32
<![CDATA[Spring Festival reception held in Tel Aviv]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474544.htm

Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]

The Chinese Embassy in Israel recently hosted a 2020 Spring Festival reception in Tel Aviv. Dai Yuming, Charge d'Affaires of the Chinese Embassy, gave a speech, as did representatives from Chinese-funded enterprises and Chinese students. Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe put on a performance for the audience afterward.

Dai briefly reviewed China's past development and the progress of China-Israel relations in 2019, including political mutual trust, bilateral trade, people-to-people exchanges and cultural communication. He looked forward to witnessing more impressive progress in 2020.


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]


Hubei Wudang Martial Arts Troupe performs onstage during the reception in Tel Aviv. [Photo by Mao Li for Chinaculture.org]

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2020-01-22 16:07:01
<![CDATA[China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism opens in Rome]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474541.htm

Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, speaks at the opening ceremony of the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism held in Rome on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

As part of the major events celebrating the 50th anniversary of the establishment of China-Italy diplomatic ties, China and Italy will join hands to launch more than 100 programs during their bilateral culture and tourism year of 2020.

Opened in Rome this Tuesday, the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism received congratulatory letters from both Chinese President Xi Jinping and Italian President Sergio Mattarella. Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, attended the opening events along with Chinese delegation.

Attending the opening concert at the Auditorium Parco della Musica were a total of 2,500 guests, including President of the Italian Senate Maria Elisabetta Alberti Casellati, Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini, Chinese ambassador to Italy Li Junhua, and Italian ambassador to China Luca Ferrari.

Luo Shugang (second left), Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism; Dario Franceschini (third left), Italian culture minister; and Li Junhua (first left), Chinese ambassador to Italy, all attend the China-Italy Tourism Forum in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

An important part of the yearlong program, the China-Italy tourism forum, was held on Tuesday afternoon. More than 400 high-level government officials, international tourism organizations, educational institutions and think tanks discussed tourism cooperation and management.

Michele dall 'Ongaro, dean of Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Italy, reviewed the college's many examples of cooperation with China and looked forward to the 2020 Sino-Italian Culture and Tourism Year.

Francesco Rutelli, the Italian coordinator of the Sino-Italian cultural cooperation, said that Italy and China have cooperation in many cultural fields, including film, audio and video, modern art and design, food, fashion and other creative industries. Rutelli believes the forum exemplifies that Italy attaches great importance to the development of culture and tourism.


The China-Italy Tourism Forum takes place in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Luo Shugang, Chinese minister of Culture and Tourism, said in a speech that holding the China-Italy Culture and Tourism Year was an important decision made by the leaders of the two countries with a view to the overall situation and long-term development of China-Italy relations.

He believed that China and Italy, as the representative ancient civilizations of the East and the West, have a long history of cultural exchanges. More than 2,000 years ago, ancient Rome was in the heyday of civilization, and the Chinese civilization also ushered in a glorious era. The ancient Silk Road connects Chinese culture, Indian culture, Persian culture, Arab culture, and ancient Greek and Roman culture.

Luo pointed out that since China and Italy established diplomatic relations 50 years ago and a comprehensive strategic partnership 16 years ago, the relationship between the two countries has maintained a good development trend. Especially in the 21st century, the two countries' cultural tourism cooperation has entered a fast track. Tourism is the best way to enhance the closeness of Chinese and Italian people. Holding the China-Italy Culture and Tourism Year is a bridge to spread civilization, exchange cultures and promote friendship.


The China-Italy Tourism Forum takes place in Rome, on Jan 21, 2020. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Italian Minister of Culture Dario Franceschini said that Italy and China have many similarities. The Belt and Road Initiative brings the civilizations of many countries together with a lot of opportunities, and it will develop in a better direction in the future. Cooperation in the fields of film, music and museums will continue. 2020 will be a very important and busy year, and there will be more cooperation between the two governments, and this momentum will continue.

Chinese and Italian cultural and tourism professionals also held discussions and exchanges on the topics of "dialogue between civilization and tourism exchanges", "intelligent tourism in an innovative era" and "social background and sustainable development of tourism".

The China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism will feature nearly 100 cultural and tourism activities in both countries, ranging from performing arts and visual arts to cultural heritage, tourism and creative design.

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2020-01-22 16:05:48
<![CDATA[Beijing's Haidian district celebrates festival with cultural activities]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474542.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

To welcome the upcoming Spring Festival, a cultural event showcasing local intangible cultural heritage and Chinese folk customs was held at the Daoxiang Lake tourism resort in Beijing's Haidian district on Jan 17.

Performances featuring bamboo-made horses, lion dance, yangko dance and other cultural activities drew over 500 visitors. New Year couplets and authentic snacks such as bingtanghulu (sugar-coated hawthorns), lyudagunr (glutinous rice rolls with sweet bean flour) and sugar painting were also on hand.

Representatives from several primary schools and middle schools in the district also came to display their handicrafts, including stone painting works and miniature monkeys made of dried cicadas and magnolia bulbs.

The district's culture and tourism bureau will hold more than 250 such cultural events in the next two months, which are estimated to attract 1.5 million participants.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

 

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2020-01-22 16:02:40
<![CDATA[Pop stars to be cultural guides in new reality show]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474534.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An online reality show that brings the audience closer to the charm of intangible cultural heritage and achievements of the country’s poverty-alleviation efforts in important revolutionary areas will be aired this year.

Supported by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism of China, the show, titled Original Aspiration on the Road, has invited young celebrities including Chinese pop star Zhu Zhengting, musical performer Zheng Yunlong and actor Li Mingde to be the travel guides.

Zhu, born in Anhui province, will take the audience to enjoy an in-depth tour in his hometown. He says he would like to go back to the places where he spent a carefree childhood and introduce the cultural treasures and local authentic snacks there.

Liu Qiang, Party secretary of the China Cultural Media Group, which is one of the show’s producers, says he hopes the show would promote the integrated development of culture and tourism as well as spread patriotism and community spirit among younger generations.

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2020-01-22 15:45:37
<![CDATA[Australian, Chinese youth celebrate Lunar New Year in Sydney with inspiring performances]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474528.htm

[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.

At the Sydney Chinese Cultural Center, around 130 young people were involved in the colorful extravaganza that saw visiting students from China's Jiangsu province perform Huangmei Opera in full costume for the local crowd.

In return, Australian students performed glamorous contemporary jazz routines. "We are extremely lucky to be connected with these performances, and the artistic side of the Chinese community," Australian dance teacher from Select Dance Co Jocelyn Ide said during her address.

"It's always of a high standard and it's so exciting and unusual for us to watch." "Of course, dance is a universal language which is spoken by all. So to be given the opportunity to experience the joining of our two cultures is invaluable, especially for our younger generations."


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

As part of a series of the "Happy Chinese New Year" events to be held over the Spring Festival period, the China-Australia Youth Culture and Technology Festival also showcased over 30 paintings and calligraphy creations with the theme of "Beautiful China" and "Australia in My Eyes." In order to highlight technology exchanges between the two nations, students also gave impressive demonstrations of aerial drones and small robotic vehicles.

"The event provides a good opportunity for young people of both countries to experience the charm of Chinese and Australian multiculturalism, enhance friendship and broaden their horizons," Director of the Sydney Chinese Cultural Center Xiao Xiayong said.

"We hope that Chinese and Australian youths will conduct more cultural and scientific exchange activities in the future, to get a better understanding of different civilizations around the world and to view them with an open and inclusive mind." 


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]


Teenagers from China and Australia have celebrated the Lunar New Year Down Under on Monday evening, at an inspiring event which showcased both traditional culture and cutting edge technology.[Photo provide to Chinaculture.org]

 

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2020-01-22 15:24:23
<![CDATA[Decorations marking Chinese Lunar New Year seen worldwide]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474521.htm

People shop at the Eaton Centre with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at the Eaton Centre with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A girl poses for photos with rat toys at a Chinese supermarket in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People shop at a Chinese supermarket with decorations marking the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the Rat in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


People walk past a giant commercial screen as it displays a Happy Chinese New Year presentation in Toronto, Canada, on Jan. 21, 2020. The Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat begins on Jan. 25, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan. 21, 2020 shows decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in front of the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos of decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens view Lego creations themed on Chinese Lunar New Year celebration inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens pose for a group photo with Lego creations themed on Chinese Lunar New Year celebration inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos with decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens walk under lanterns in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Citizens take photos with decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year inside a mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:50:43
<![CDATA[Performance held to celebrate upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year in Malta]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474522.htm

An artist performs Chinese Kongfu during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform lion dance during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


An artist performs Sichuan Opera face-changing during a performance celebrating the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year at the Mediterranean Conference Centre in Valleta, Malta, Jan 19, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:47:03
<![CDATA[Chinese dancers perform in Israel to celebrate Chinese New Year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474519.htm

Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

The Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater in the Central Israeli city of Tel Aviv was crowded with audience enjoying the Chinese dance drama Shi Feng on Monday evening.

The dance drama, performed by dancers of China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater as part of the celebrations for the upcoming Chinese New Year, injected the air of joy into the Year of the Rat which will start on Jan. 25.

Shi Feng, which refers to the spirit of Chinese intellectuals, has served as the cornerstone of traditional Chinese culture. The dance drama expressed the spirit characterized by benevolence, righteousness, manners, wisdom and trustworthiness.

Integrating with Chinese classical and modern dance, the performance was welcomed warmly by Israeli audience. The Chinese dance drama will continue to be performed on Tuesday evening to satisfy the demand of more Israeli audience.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

"The dance performance is very amazing and we are purely enjoyed," said Liat Pardo, a 28-year-old Israeli dancer.

Pardo told Xinhua that she was surprised by the superb dancing techniques of Chinese dancers and hopes to have the opportunity to appreciate Chinese dance in China.

The 40-year-old Rami Yifrach was also moved by the Chinese dance drama.

"Very well-performed and it represents Chinese traditional culture very well," he said.

The dance drama conveyed the morals of Chinese culture like justice and integrity through dancers' movement, Yifrach told Xinhua.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

A total of three Chinese artist groups participate in the series of celebrations for the upcoming Chinese New Year held in Israel, said Tao Chen, director of China Cultural Center in Tel Aviv.

Prior to the Shi Feng dance drama, a martial arts troupe from Wudang Mountain, known as a traditional center for the teaching and practice of martial arts located in Central China's Hubei province, demonstrated the Chinese martial arts for Israelis from Jan 16 to Jan 18.

Chinese famous dancer Yang Liping would bring her version of Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring, where Yang integrates Chinese and Western cultures by using a lot of oriental images, according to Tao.

The celebrations for the Chinese New Year in Israel have been held for 12 consecutive years, Tao told Xinhua.


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Dancers from China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater perform a drama piece titled "Shi Feng" in celebrations of the upcoming Chinese New Year in Tel Aviv, Israel, Jan 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:26:48
<![CDATA[Chinese, Romanian musicians perform in Bucharest to celebrate upcoming Spring Festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474520.htm

A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, wowed an audience on Monday evening as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year.

For two hours, the orchestra, led by Chinese pianist Wang Yalun, bamboo flute player Wei Sijun as well as Romanian pan flute player Gheorghe Zamfir, charmed the audience with their considerable virtuosity.

At the start of the concert, Chinese Ambassador to Romania Jiang Yu highlighted the significance of the Chinese Spring Festival, or lunar new year.

Some 800 people enjoyed the performance at the concert hall decorated with Chinese lanterns. Among the audience were musicians, experts of think-tanks, academics as well as foreign diplomats and ambassadors in Bucharest.

Lorica Ivaner, a retired teacher, was dressed in red as is traditional for the Chinese New Year. This marks the fourth time she is visiting such a concert, and she remembered perfectly all the details from last year's concert.


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

Adriana Radulescu, a lawyer, said that she would never miss an opportunity to go to China-themed events because she admires China a lot.

"I know China and I admire both its old civilization and what China is doing at present," she said, adding that "China has a culture of work, the ambition to achieve outstanding things and to create something for mankind. They (the Chinese) are very hard-working."

Andrei Licaret, a famous Romanian pianist, came for the first time to the concert. He has worked with Chinese musicians in Romania many times.

The concert included Bela Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances, Concerto for Bamboo Flute and Orchestra by Guo Wenjing, Ludwig van Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Alexander Borodin's Polovtsian Dances from Prince Igor and the Forest Dance by Gheorghe Zamfir.

Long Yu, the conductor, expressed his happiness to perform in Romania. "We are all very happy to be in Romania today... We are also happy to have the chance to learn about Romanian music."

The entire concert was a great success and received thunderous applause in the end. There was even an encore.


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Romanian pan flute player Gheorghe Zamfir performs with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Chinese pianist Wang Yalun plays the piano with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Bamboo flute player Wei Sijun performs with China Philharmonic Orchestra during a concert hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A concert of the China Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by the Romanian Athenaeum, is held in Bucharest, capital of Romania, Jan. 20, 2020, as part of a series of cultural events to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-22 14:26:02
<![CDATA[Hungary stages New Year Concert in Shanghai]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474518.htm

[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The consulate general of Hungary in Shanghai presented a New Year Concert to a packed audience at Moore Memorial Church on Jan 21, featuring one of Hungarian’s top sopranos Erika Miklosa and her partner Istvan Horvath.

A member of the Hungarian State Opera until 1999, Miklosa was known for her soprano roles as Adele from Die Fledermaus, Gilda from Rigoletto and Konstanze from Die Entführung aus dem Serail. Since 2004, she is regularly featured on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera in New York.

Horvath made his debut in the role of Count Almaviva in Rossini's The Barber of Seville in Miskolc. He has been a soloist with the Hungarian State Opera since 2010. In addition to appearances and recitals in Hungary, he has sung across Europe, North America and South America.


[Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

This is the fifth New Year concert the Huangaran consulate has hosted at Moore Memorial Church, a historic landmark in downtown Shanghai. Established in 1887, the church was designed by Hungarian-Slovak artitect Laszlo Hudec, who was Shanghai’s master builder when he worked in the city between 1918 and 1945.

Captions: Hungarian opera singers Erika Miklosa (left) and Istvan Horvath take the stage at Moor Memorial Church for a New Year Concert hosted by the consulate general of Hungary in Shanghai on Jan 21.

This is the fifth year the Hungarian New Year concert has taken place at Moore Memorial Church, a historic landmark in downtown Shanghai designed by Hungarian-Slovak artitect Laszlo Hudec.

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2020-01-22 14:08:58
<![CDATA[Lunar New Year celebrations held in Singapore]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474517.htm

People perform the "Golden Pyro Dragon Dance" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform the "Golden Pyro Dragon Dance" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform "The Story of Nian" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]


People perform "The Story of Nian" as part of the Lunar New Year celebration performance held at Singapore's Gardens by the Bay on Jan. 21, 2020. [Photo by Then Chih Wey/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-22 14:04:14
<![CDATA[Festive China: Spring Festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/22/content_1474501.htm

The first day of the first lunar month is Spring Festival, the beginning of a new year for China. Spring Festival for the Year of the Rat falls on Saturday.

Spring Festival is China's biggest extravaganza and a day for family reunion. Being around family members at the turn of the year is a vital ritual for the Chinese people.

Watch this episode of Festive China to find out more.

Festive China is a series of short clips that focus on traditional Chinese festivals and festivities, the cultural connotations of traditional holidays, their development and changes,and how they are manifested in today's China.

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2020-01-22 08:43:03
<![CDATA[Beijing restaurant celebrates Chinese New Year traditions]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474427.htm

Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

More than 100 local residents have joined in traditional Chinese New Year activities, such as writing Chinese couplets, at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in the capital since mid-January.

The idea is to carry on traditional Chinese culture and folk customs, says Jia Wenyu, an employee at the restaurant, which has five locations across Beijing.

"In the past, people wrote couplets by hand, but now most couplets are printed, with some not even up to standards," Jia says.

"We want to bring back authentic folk customs for Chinese New Year."

The event has received an active response from Beijing residents, especially among seniors, and will last until Jan 23. All the couplets made will be given to diners and workers in the neighborhood.

Experts have also been invited to impart to young people knowledge of the old ways of celebrating.


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Locals participate in traditional Chinese New Year activities at the Sishi Tongtang restaurant in Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-20 15:52:29
<![CDATA[Bonsai exhibition brightens Summer Palace]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474425.htm

A visitor takes photos of a plum blossom bonsai.[Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]

A bonsai exhibition displaying plum blossom and wintersweet varieties opened in Summer Palace on Monday to welcome the Spring Festival.

About 100 bonsai trees have been showcased for the exhibition, and many of them are over 100 years old. Some off-season floral varieties, like peonies and magnolias, have also joined the exhibition, thanks to horticultural technology.

Visitors to the exhibition can also enjoy oolong tea and fortune cookies in the exhibition area. The exhibition will last until Feb 2.

Plum blossoms and wintersweets used to be widely planted in the Summer Palace, the former royal resort during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), according to historical records, and Emperor Qianlong (1711-99) wrote many poems dedicated to these blossoms.


Children draw sketches of a bonsai during the exhibition.[Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]


A wintersweet bonsai on display. [Photo by Wang Kaihao/chinadaily.com.cn]


Visitors enjoy oolong tea while viewing the bonsai. [Photo by Jiang Dong/ chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-20 15:10:02
<![CDATA[Folklore performances presented across China ahead of Lunar New Year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474423.htm

Artists perform Shehuo folk dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Jingxingkuang District of Shijiazhuang city, North China's Hebei province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


A dough-modelling craftswoman teaches children to make dough modelling during a folklore festival held at Xinanli historical culture blocks in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Members of an art troupe rehearse the traditional Yangge dance for the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at a community in Lanshan District of Linyi city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform lion dance during a folklore festival held at Xinanli historical culture blocks in Nanjing, capital of East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform folk dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Huancui District in Weihai city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Members of an art troupe rehearse the traditional Yangge dance for the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at a community in Lanshan District of Linyi city, East China's Shandong province, Jan 19, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists perform dragon dance during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Zhongcun village of Luting Township in Yuyao city, East China's Zhejiang province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]


Children perform kung fu during a cultural event to welcome the coming Chinese Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, at Longquansi village of Baofeng county in Pingdingshan city, Central China's Henan province, Jan 18, 2020. Various kinds of folklore performances are presented across China to greet the country's most grand festival of Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan 25 this year. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-20 11:19:38
<![CDATA[Several art groups from Wuhan bring performances to Belgium]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474421.htm

An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


An artist from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]


Artists from China's Wuhan City dances during a Chinese Spring Festival gala at the Liege Convention Center in Liege, Belgium, Jan 18, 2020. As the Chinese Spring Festival is approaching, performers of several art groups from China's Wuhan City came to Belgium on Jan 17 and 18, bringing performances to the Belgian audience as well as overseas Chinese. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-20 10:23:18
<![CDATA[Disney celebrates Chinese New Year as 'Year of the Mouse']]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474419.htm

Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020. Disney has embraced the Lunar New Year and is happily transforming "The Year of the Rat" into "The Year of the Mouse" -- an opportunity that only comes around once every twelve years.[Photo/Xinhua]

Disney's California Adventure Park was alive on Friday with fat red lanterns with decorative gold tassels waggling from the parapets, festive red banners fluttering from the lampposts, Chinese-themed tablecloths sporting an Asian-style Mickey Mouse silhouette, and even a magnificent display of Chinese fireworks. Chinese culturally-themed performances featured exotic dragon dances and martial arts and thrilled American spectators.

Disney has embraced the Lunar New Year and is happily transforming "The Year of the Rat" into "The Year of the Mouse" -- an opportunity that only comes around once every twelve years. Their California Adventure Park in Anaheim has been transformed as well, with a colorful Lunar New Year theme that has turned the park into a sea of red and gold -- the Chinese New Year's traditional colors -- and a wonderland of festive Asian holiday cheer.

The Chinese New Year, celebrated in most of Asia as the Lunar New Year, falls early this year on Jan 25. It is based on a 12-year Zodiac cycle of characters, with 2020 being the Year of the Rat.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

During the 24 days of this multicultural celebration which started on Friday, guests of the park will enjoy exciting live entertainment and musical performances, including "Mulan's Lunar New Year Procession" and the return of the heartwarming "Hurry Home -- Lunar New Year Celebration" prior to the "World of Color" nighttime spectacular. They will also enjoy new menus of Asian-themed fare, like Shrimp Fried Rice with Garlic Edamame, Char Su Pork Bao, and many others.

Thousands of visitors flooded into the park on Friday to enjoy the Lunar New Year festivities and partake of fun activities, with tables of little blonde American girls sitting side-by-side with raven-haired Chinese darlings having fun coloring Chinese fans, where eight-year-old Olinia told Xinhua she isn't really into Disney princesses, so she loved drawing Mulan, her favorite strong heroine.

There was also Chinese-style brush-painting calligraphy and a Wishing Wall made of human hopes written on decorative mouse-shaped cardboard disks and hung together on strings.

Gary Maggetti, general manager of Pixar Pier, Park Banquets and Festivals, told Xinhua, "It's been such a labor of love for us to research and work with our internal resource groups to understand the correct way to celebrate Chinese New Year and add some Disney playfulness. When you enter here, the vibe, the feeling, and the celebration makes you feel immersed in it."


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Carla Carlile, show director for creative entertainment at Disney resort, started working on the Lunar New Year Project many years ago at Disneyland and then it moved across the street to Disney's California Adventure Park and expanded dramatically.

"I love working with all the Asian community groups and on the Mulan procession," she told Xinhua in an exclusive interview on Friday. "And having authentic Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese performers. We've mixed our Disney magic with authentic culture so for our Lunar New Year's celebration, our Disney characters are dressed up."

And she's not kidding. Alvin and the Chipmunks, Goofy, The Three Little Pigs are part of the New Year's celebration and of course Disney's Chinese heroine, Mulan, leads the Mulan Procession with her friendly dragon guardian, Mushu, by her side.

Mulan's procession includes Asian drummers, exotic fan and ribbon dancers, martial artists, a large rippling lucky dragon, and the musical stylings of The Melody of China, a premier Chinese musical ensemble performing in the park during the Chinese New Year holidays.

Six-year-old Sophia gleefully told Xinhua, "I loved the dragon the best!" But her sister, four-year-old Jessica, protested, "No, no, I loved the dancing ribbons best."


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Brooke, a five-year-old local American kid in a red silk dress has fallen in love with all things Chinese. "I love everything! Especially my pretty dress and Chinese food."

Myra from Downy, browsing the stalls for Chinese merchandize, told Xinhua, "My Mom is a schoolteacher and she hangs these Chinese decorations up in the classroom to teach her kids about Chinese traditions and culture. She couldn't come, so I'm buying for her."

As the natural ambassadors for the Year of the Mouse, Mickey and Minnie Mouse glammed up the proceedings with their gorgeous new Chinese-style costumes, designed by haute couture award-winning designer, Guo Pei.

"Children all over the world love Mickey and Minnie. It's an opportunity for me to express and share Chinese culture to the world through my work," said Guo, an internationally-prominent Chinese fashion designer.

Carlile thinks all Disney's cultural festivals at the resort are important. "They open the doors to folks who haven't experienced these cultures. It's inclusive and open to everyone and it's fun to explore new tastes and experiences," she told Xinhua.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

Disneyland's head chef of cuisine, Jeremiah Balogh, is responsible for Disney's Park regular menus as well as the special new Asian festival menus.

"As a chef, we are in love with food and we love to see different ingredients and recipes coming together from all cultures and walks of life. "

Maggetti also feels food and culture can bring people together and create harmony, and that celebrating the Chinese New Year gives Disney's guests an opportunity to try new things.

"The feedback from our guests (about the Chinese New Year) has been very warm -- to try something different or to reinforce a family memory. It makes Chinese culture more accessible to Americans and is an invitation for Chinese visitors to come visit Disneyland too," he said with a smile.


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]


Disney's California Adventure Park celebrates Chinese New Year as "Year of the Mouse", Jan 17, 2020.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-20 09:38:00
<![CDATA[Performers who made their mark last year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474417.htm

Pu Shu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

One of the few Chinese singer-songwriters who manages to be both popular and keep a low profile. In 1999, the self-taught Pu rose to instant fame after releasing his debut album, I Went to 2000. His best-known hits, such as New Boys, The Flowers and Journey, are still popular today. In 2003, after releasing his second album, Life Like Summer Flowers, Pu withdrew from the limelight. Few artists can make a successful return after years away from the scene. But in 2018, Pu came back with a new album, Orion, which won commercial and critical acclaim. In summer last year, he toured nationwide and appeared on the popular reality television show The Big Band.


Jay Chou. [Photo provided to China Daily]

After a long wait, the Taiwan singer launched his latest single, Won't Cry, and a surprise video at 11 pm on Sept 16. By 3:30 pm the next day, the song, written by Chou and Vincent Fang, and which also features Taiwan pop-rock band Mayday's lead vocalist Ashin, had taken 20 million yuan ($2.81 million), a record for digital music sales in China, with each download costing 3 yuan. Since Chou, 40, released his debut album Jay in 2001, he has become one of Mandarin pop's biggest stars. His blend of rhythm and blues, love ballads and rap also often includes classical music and traditional Chinese instruments. In July 2016, he released his 14th studio album, Bedtime Stories.


New Pants. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Chinese indie bands used to appeal to a minority taste. But in the summer, New Pants, a punk rock outfit based in Beijing, gained a large number of new fans after appearing on The Big Band, where it performed a retro blend of disco music and electro-rock songs, wowing audiences. Peng Lei and Pang Kuan, New Pants' lead vocalist and keyboardist, both age 43, are arguably the best-known middle-aged members of the country's indie rock music scene. Classmates at middle school, they started a punk band in 1997, signing with Modern Sky Records, then a lesser-known label, but now the biggest indie music record company in the country. To support their musical ambitions, Peng works as an animator, and Pang as a designer.


Chinese singer Faye Wong performs at the CCTV 2018 Spring Festival Gala, Feb 15, 2018. [Photo/screenshot of the CCTV 2018 Spring Festival Gala]

Wong has always been a headliner. Her songs, including I'm Willing and Dream Love, have straddled the decades and genres. It is virtually impossible to think about the country's pop music scene without coming up with a few of Wong's hits. Her most recent album, To Love, was released back in 2003 and she staged her "final" tour two years later. Last year, the 50-year-old, who had been out of the limelight for years, performed the theme song for the Chinese movie My People, My Country to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. Although news of a new album and tours have been circulating on the internet, there has been no official announcement. However, it is not the first time that reports have surfaced about a comeback album.


Nine Percent. [Photo/Official Weibo account of Nine Percent]

This popular Chinese boy band broke up on Oct 9, after just 18 months together, causing many fans to voice their disappointment. The group rose to fame in 2018 on the hit reality show Idol Producer, and in November that year released its debut album To the Nines. The nine-member outfit, led by Cai Xukun, who has nearly 30 million followers on his Sina Weibo account, rocked the country's entertainment scene and saw the rise of the "fan economy". More male and female pop groups are now emerging, such as R1SE, an 11-member boy group.

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2020-01-20 07:43:21
<![CDATA['China's Woodstock' raises profile of rock]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474415.htm

Xie Tianxiao performs at the Midi Music Festival in 2017 and at the festival camp at Taihu Lake, Jiangsu province, in 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

Midi Music Festival marks 20 years of nurturing talent

Nearly 20 years ago, young musicians in 30 Chinese rock bands performed at the Midi School of Music in Shangdi, in northern Beijing's Haidian district. The school, founded in 1993, was China's first school of contemporary music.

Although the bands were relatively unknown, their performances on the first two days of May 2000 attracted about 2,000 fans, filling the 500-seat auditorium and spilling into public spaces outside, where the music could still be heard.

Shan Wei, a 26-year-old music journalist from China Radio International, was told about the shows by friends and spent three hours on the bus to join the audience.

"The shows were free and very crowded. I stood near a window outside the auditorium to watch them," said Shan, noting that one of the bands was Tongue, from the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region.

"The audience was mainly composed of students from the school, along with rock music lovers from Beijing and nearby areas," Shan said. "Between acts, free beer was provided. I soon made new friends, and we sat on the ground drinking outside the venue.

"The weather was great and the music was very loud. It felt like going to a high school reunion and being part of a huge community."

Later, the two-day event was officially named the Midi Music Festival.


Music fans cheer a band performing at the Midi Music Festival in Suzhou, Jiangsu province, in April 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

Over the past 19 years, the festival has been staged 38 times in cities including Beijing, Shanghai and Suzhou, Jiangsu province.

Known as "China's Woodstock", a reference to the legendary music festival in the United States, it has propelled many rock bands to fame. Nearly all the country's rock stars have performed at the event, including Cui Jian and Tang Dynasty, one of the first Chinese heavy metal bands.

With this year marking the festival's 20th anniversary, a number of commemorative activities are planned.

Shan, now 45, who was born and raised in Suzhou and graduated from Renmin University of China in 1997 with a degree in political science and international affairs, is now the festival director, having joined the organizing team in 2009.

This year, the event will be staged in cities including Chengdu, Sichuan province, and Shenzhen, Guangdong province. Venues in Shandong, Fujian and Hebei provinces will also hold performances, Shan said. Lineups will be announced soon.

"We will not only celebrate the Midi Music Festival's 20th anniversary, but also the country's rock music scene during the past two decades. It's a collective memory," Shan said.

He added that some of the bands who performed at the first festival in 2000 will be invited to join the celebrations, including Tongue, Miserable Faith and Muma, all of which have risen to become leading performers in China.


Xie Tianxiao performs at the Midi Music Festival in 2017 and at the festival camp at Taihu Lake, Jiangsu province, in 2018. [Photo by Yan Min/For China Daily]

In 2009, when the festival celebrated its 10th birthday, it was staged over three days in Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, a small city about three hours from Shanghai by train. It was the first time that the event had been held away from Beijing, and it attracted more than 30,000 fans.

"It was challenging to launch a large-scale music festival in a fresh city, watched by new fans. I remember that many of them traveled to Zhenjiang from Beijing and other parts of the country, making the event that year a great success," Shan said.

He added that due to this, the local government invited the festival to return to the city the following year, when it attracted audiences of 120,000 over four days.

This development saw the festival start to spread its wings further, and last year, cities staging the event included Suzhou, Chengdu and Dezhou, Shandong.


Students attend a guitar course at the Midi School of Music in Beijing. [Photo by Wang Jing/China Daily]

In 2009, Wu Shanshan, an art teacher in Beijing, attended the event when it was staged in Zhenjiang, describing it as "the best outdoor rock festival" she had ever experienced.

She traveled with a group of friends from the capital, not only to see pioneering musician Cui Jian, considered the godfather of China's rock music scene, but to watch Second Hand Rose, a band she never expected to warm to.

"I was never really a fan of Second Hand Rose, but they really rocked that day," Wu said."When they came onto the stage, their outlandish costumes lit up the night and their music featured errenzhuan (a type of folk singing and dancing from Northeast China)."

Wu, who has attended many music festivals, added: "The best thing about going to them is that you can watch your favorite artists and also be surprised by new acts. Basically, as a fan, you're paying for the diversity you're exposed to."


Gao Hu, from Miserable Faith, and other participants perform at the Midi Music Festival in 2015. [Photo by Lyv Ran/FOR CHINA DAILY]

Now, more than 100 music festivals are held nationwide every year, offering rock bands more opportunities to perform. The younger generation of music lovers is more open to different styles and can also afford to travel overseas to attend performances.

Shan said:"The rock music scene is getting better and more diverse. The Midi Music Festival is not only the oldest in China, but also injects new blood by discovering and inviting emerging bands to perform."

In 2010, an offshoot of the festival, the Midi Kids Band Competition was staged, aimed at discovering and showcasing child bands from across the country.

In 2018, Cloud, a seven-piece band formed by children from Xichang, Sichuan, with an average age of 12, stood out at the competition. Last year, the band performed reggae at the Midi Music Festival in Suzhou and also appeared at the Wild Mint Festival in Moscow, Russia, at the end of June.

Shan said the Midi Music Festival's success owes a lot to the Midi School of Music.

Now located in Changping district, northern Beijing, the school is attended by about 400 students from across the country. Founded by Zhang Fan, who is still its president, it is considered the "Whampoa (Huangpu) Military Academy of rock music", a reference to one of the country's best-known modern military institutions.


Gao Hu, from Miserable Faith, and other participants perform at the Midi Music Festival in 2015. [Photo by Lyv Ran/FOR CHINA DAILY]

Gao Hu, lead vocalist and songwriter with Miserable Faith, one of the country's most popular indie bands, said:"Many bands have been formed at the school, but 20 years ago we didn't have much opportunity to perform onstage, which was depressing. The school offered us a chance to realize our dreams."

Gao became interested in rock music during high school, teaching himself to play guitar. In 1997, he began studying at the Midi School of Music, where he met Zhang Jing, now the band's bassist. Miserable Faith was founded two years later.

"We lived in a place called Shucun, near the school, which was also home to many of the other students. Lots of bands were bursting on to the music scene. We loved different styles," Gao said, adding that the rent was 200 yuan a month.

Last summer, the popular reality show The Big Band brought Chinese indie rock into the mainstream for the first time. Acts such as Miserable Faith, The Face and New Pants appeared on the show, which has built up a large fan base.

Li Guobiao, vice-president of the Midi School of Music, said:"It takes solitude, sleepless nights and even starvation to achieve success as an indie rock band. The success of the show encourages young bands to pursue their dreams."

Roommates Huang Xiangyu and Zhu Yuanwu, both 22, have been studying electronic guitar at the Midi School of Music since 2018.


Li Guoji, deputy principle of the Midi School of Music in Beijing. [Photo by Wang Jing/China Daily]

Zhu, born and raised in Jilin province, said: "I fell in love with rock music when I was 6 years old. I went to a record store in my hometown that sold music by Cui Jian and Black Panther. I instantly loved the songs because the lyrics sounded different and the melodies were full of energy."

To study music in Beijing in the hope of becoming a full-time rock performer, he dropped out of a medical school at home.

"My parents were totally against my idea of learning music. To earn tuition fees, I worked at a local musical instrument store," Zhu said.

Huang also paid his own tuition fees, even though his parents objected to his plans. He said he learned about the Midi School of Music online and paid it a visit before applying to enroll.

Zhu added, "I enjoy the atmosphere at the school, because all the students join it due to their passion for music."

On Dec 27, the school closed for the winter vacation, but neither Zhu or Huang returned home, choosing instead to remain in Beijing to find work to pay for their tuition fees for the next semester.

"Our goal is simple. We practice at least three hours a day, in the hope of making a living from music," Zhu said.

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2020-01-20 07:26:05
<![CDATA[Happy Chinese New Year Grand Parade held in Dubai]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/20/content_1474381.htm

A parade to celebrate the upcoming Chinese New Year was held in the city center of Dubai on Friday. Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice-president and prime minister of the UAE and Ni Jian, Chinese Ambassador to the UAE, along with a number of government officials and royals in the UAE were present at the event. At the same time, tens of thousands of people, including overseas Chinese, visitors and locals attended the gathering and shared the joyously festive atmosphere for the Chinese Lunar New Year celebration.

Li Xuhang, consul general of China in Dubai, delivered a speech and said that the annual parade has become the grandest event to celebrate the Chinese Spring Festival for overseas Chinese in Dubai. He added the parade also can boost people-to-people exchanges between China and the UAE.

It is worth noting that 2019 was a momentous year as it marked the 35th anniversary of bilateral relations between China and the UAE.

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2020-01-20 11:47:33
<![CDATA[26th Int'l Dinosaur Lantern Show opens in Zigong, Sichuan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/19/content_1474330.htm

Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows illuminated lanterns themed the Belt and Road on the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened Friday night in the city of Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]


People watch the 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show in Zigong, Southwest China's Sichuan province, Jan 17, 2020. The 26th International Dinosaur Lantern Show opened here Friday night. Covering more than 33 hectares, the show, running until mid-March, consists of nine parts with themes including the Belt and Road, Chinese lanterns and dream river. Sets of huge dinosaur lanterns are also displayed at the show. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:42:07
<![CDATA[Chinese dough modelling exhibition held in Tokyo]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/19/content_1474328.htm

Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows dough-made figurines of characters in "A Dream of Red Mansions" at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]

What comes to your mind when mentioning dough?

Doughnuts? Dumpling? Or bread? Let's see what Chinese artists can make out of dough! Chinese dough modelling exhibition has kicked off at Japan-China Friendship Center Museum in Tokyo, Japan. The exhibition is held from Jan 18 to Feb 8, 2020.


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a visitor takes photos dough-made figurines of characters in Beijing Opera at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a dough-made Japanese girl at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition at in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a Chinese artist creates a dough modelling art work at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors watch a Chinese artist creating a dough modelling art work at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows a visitor enjoys dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 17, 2020 shows visitors enjoy dough modelling art works at the Chinese dough modelling exhibition in Tokyo, Japan. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:27:03
<![CDATA[Canada Post unveils Year of Rat stamps and collectibles in Toronto]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/19/content_1474326.htm

Stamp collector Walt Berry shows his collections of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. Canada Post unveiled the Year of the Rat stamps and collectibles in celebration of the upcoming Chinese Lunar Year of the Rat on Thursday. [Photo/Xinhua]


The combined photo provided by Canada Post on Jan 16, 2020 shows the samples of domestic-rate stamp (L) and international-rate stamp of the year of the Rat. [Photo/Xinhua]


Stamp collector Gary Norris shows his collections of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A staff member of Canada Post shows domestic-rate stamps of the year of the Rat at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


The Mayor of Toronto John Tory (2nd R) and one of the designers Albert Ng (1st L) attend the unveiling ceremony of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


A man takes photos of the year of the Rat stamps-themed mailbox during the unveiling ceremony of the year of the Rat stamps at Chinese Cultural Centre of Greater Toronto in Toronto, Canada, Jan 16, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-19 15:13:53
<![CDATA[Eat beat for Spring Festival dinner]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/19/content_1474324.htm

Green and red chili fish from Sifangsanchuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

1. Sifangsanchuan

To celebrate the coming Chinese Spring Festival on Jan 24, Sifangsanchuan restaurant launched three festive set menus for groups of four, six and eight to gather and enjoy the holiday. The green and red chili fish and spicy chicken with red pepper and cashew nut are the highlights, as the mild flavor of the fish and the spiciness of the chicken add a hot flavor to the feast.

2F, No 1 Nansanlitunlu, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-8588-7150


Lobster at Tian Tai Xuan. [Photo provided to China Daily]

2. Tian Tai Xuan

Tian Tai Xuan restaurant in Tianjin has created three special Chinese New Year menus to celebrate the special occasion. Singaporean chef Goh Wooi Cheat's signature dish Buddha Jumps over the Wall soup is the must-try, which includes Australian abalone, dried scallop, sea cucumber, fish maw, matsutake and quail egg.

No 167 Dagubei Road, Heping District, Tianjin. 022-5809-5098


A dish from Park Gyatt Beijing. [Photo provided to China Daily]

3. Park Hyatt Beijing

Two special set menus for Chinese New Year at Park Hyatt Beijing are only available on Jan 24. Each dish has an auspicious meaning, such as good fortune and good luck. The two-color dumplings are a must on the menu and are made with sea cucumber, scallop, shrimp and pork filling. Spicy flavored lobster is another highlight.

No 2 Jianguomeiwai Street, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-8567-1567


Poon chai from Yu. [Photo provided to China Daily]

4. Yu

From Jan 24 to Feb 8, Yu restaurant will launch a special menu with special ingredients for family reunion. From matsutake soup to black truffle mushroom with beef, and from pan-fried shrimp with special sauce to steamed fish with caviar, each dish uses the most seasonal ingredients. Poon Chai, Guangdong's famous casserole, is another specialty for Chinese New Year.

2F, No 83A, Jianguolu, Chaoyang district, Beijing. 010-5908-8111


Braised fish from Beijing Hotel Nuo. [Photo provided to China Daily]

5. Beijing Hotel Nuo

Beijing Hotel Nuo will serve a Beijing cuisine Chinese New Year Dinner on Jan 24. The dinner starts with eight cold dishes, including four meat dishes and four vegetable dishes. Peking duck is the star, which is roasted in the traditional way and served with handmade pancakes. Wok fried lobster with spring onion and rice cake are also must-try dishes.

No 33 Dongchang'anjie, Dongcheng district, Beijing. 010-8500-4171

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2020-01-19 09:45:43
<![CDATA[Footprints in the snow]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/18/content_1474322.htm

Xiluoqi maintenance crew write on the snow-covered ground "safe trip" in Chinese characters.[Photo/Xinhua]

On Jan 8, the staff of the Xiluoqi maintenance team in Tahe county, Heilongjiang province, carried out work at the 497 kilometer junction of the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway.

Affiliated to China Raiway Harbin Group's Jiagedaqi construction section, the Xiluoqi team is responsible for some of the toughest maintenance work deep inside the most frigid reaches of the Greater Khingan Mountains, where winter temperatures hover below minus 30 C. This remote section of the line can only be reached by train, and no traces of human habitation can be seen for as far as the eye can see.

The 10 staff members here are in charge of maintaining 11.2 kilometers of railway, including a 1,160-meter-long railway tunnel to the "Arctic" Mohe, Xiluoqi Ridge No 2 Tunnel, which is the entrance to the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway thoroughfare.


Workers' dormitory.[Photo/Xinhua]

The living and working conditions here are so harsh that the team can only reach their points on foot, carrying all the tools they need-hammers, shovels, pickaxes and wrenches-to clear snow banks and tunnels and to repair frost damage. Over the course of four hours, they make several trips delivering equipment and cover nearly 13 kilometers by following their own footprints in the snow beside the railway tracks. There is no mobile phone signal in the mountains. The staff have to use a railway phone in the maintenance zone to communicate with the outside world.

There are no fixed meal breaks, but instead the team grab a bite of hot food after they return to their bunks-perhaps the warmest moment of the day. In the face of steep mountains, bitter cold and heavy snow, the Xiluoqi maintenance team tenaciously guard the access to and safety of this remote stretch of rail line.


Maintenance work at the 497 kilometer junction of the Nenjiang-Greater Khingan Forest Railway.[Photo/Xinhua]


A short break in the snow.[Photo/Xinhua]


Xiluoqi Ridge No 2 Tunnel.[Photo/Xinhua]


Maintenance work at the 501 kilometer junction of the railway.[Photo/Xinhua]


Workers wait for a train to pass.[Photo/Xinhua]


De-icing operation in the tunnel.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-18 13:09:03
<![CDATA[Honored by rosewood and the printed page]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/18/content_1474320.htm

Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

In early spring of 2015 woodcarving craftsmen on both sides of the Taiwan Straits joined forces to start working on the finest rosewood. More than 20 of them adopted different woodcarving methods, including transparent and hollowed-out engravings, to reproduce Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains, one of the most famous traditional Chinese landscape paintings, in a very special way.

For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting by Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting. Today it is often referred to as one of the top 10 masterpieces of Chinese art.

In the painting the essence of the terrain and landforms on both sides of the Fuchun River are distilled in fine detail. The depiction is dynamic and wild, partly reflecting some of the painting's tumultuous history, one episode of which resulted in its being set on fire by one of its owners intent on taking it with him into the afterlife.

That attempt was thwarted and the painting was saved, but in two pieces. Eventually one half ended up in the Zhejiang Provincial Museum and the other in the Taipei Palace Museum. In June 2011, 360 years after the two pieces went their separate ways, the two scrolls, Remains of Mountains and Fellow Apprentice Wuyong, were reunited in the Taipei Palace Museum for an exhibition that lasted two months.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Though the reunion was transient, it spurred the imagination of at least one person to contemplate on how the two parts of the painting could be brought together permanently.

That person was Yao Xiangdong, director of the Oriental Rosewood Furniture Art Museum in Changshu, Jiangsu province, a county-level city under the jurisdiction of Suzhou. For Yao the best medium by which the estranged halves could be remarried was rosewood, not only because his city is known as the hometown of rosewood but also the fact that Suzhou-style woodwork has become a symbol of elegance.

"Restoring the painting in the form of a wood carving is perhaps the best name card for Changshu," he said.

Yao's idea in turn spawned an annual cross-Straits creative design competition whose central figure is Huang Gongwang, and which has now been held three times. In the many award-winning artworks, traditional Chinese cultural elements have been brought to life by young talent on both sides of the Straits, with an emphasis on the modern perspective.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

It is part of drive by Changshu to draw on its cultural resources to promote the city's growth, using talent from home and abroad, and at the same time promoting the city's cultural heritage.

On Dec 21 the first Changshu Elite Entrepreneurship Alliance Conference hosted by the Changshu Municipal Committee and the People's Government was held, with the theme "gathering wisdom and building Changshu".

The purpose of the alliance is to pool kinship, nostalgia, and friendship, and to gather talent, wisdom, and capital to build Changshu. The alliance consists of eight zones, three domestic-Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen-and five international-the Belt and Road countries, Japan and South Korea, Europe, the Americas and Australia-each of them headed by a convener.

The alliance will work hand in hand with the city government, and a conference will be held annually at which knowledge and expertise that can help promote Changshu will be pooled.


Kuncheng Lake is one of the key freshwater lakes of Changshu.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"Cultural change accounts for a big part of the city's talent project," said Chen Meilou, vice-president of Jiangsu World Overseas Chinese Entrepreneurs Association.

"Changshu can flourish with sustained commitment to more than just a healthy and friendly economic and investment environment. An effort to understand what motivates talent to stay should be carefully planned to align cultural goals too."

The opening ceremony of the Dai Yi Academic Museum was held in the south square of Changshu Library at the end of October. Dai Yi, 93, director of the National Qing Dynasty History Compilation Committee, hopes to establish a Qing history academic research base there, and Changshu, his hometown, seems to have heard his voice.

Liu Mengxi, a lifelong researcher at the China Academy of Art, said Changshu is a place of culture. The completion of the museum has added a new cultural edge to the city that will play an important role in the development of Changshu's cultural research and the spread of historical culture.


Aerial views of Changshu's downtown.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Cao Peigen, a research librarian and researcher on the culture and history of book collecting at Changshu Institute of Technology, said that during the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties more than 300 book collectors resided in Changshu, representing more than a tenth of the collectors across the country. Ye Dehui, an expert on the Qing Dynasty, paid tribute to the city in a preface to the book Changshu Gu Family Stone House Bibliography, saying: "A town's achievement in book collecting put it at the summit of the nation."

Anecdotes on collecting books, passed on through families and to others, abound in Changshu. One legend has it that a particular species of bookworm winds its way through the forest of books it inhabits looking for fairies. If it finds and devours fairies three times it gains qi (energy) and is possessed of maiwang, or grand outlook.

In the Ming Dynasty, a man named Zhao Qimei, of Changshu, had a special liking for the word maiwang, so he changed the name of his father's library "Songshi (pine and stone) Room" to "Maiwang Pavilion" to express his passion and love for books.


Shanghu Lake in Changshu is said to have been named after Jiang Shang, a Chinese noble who helped king Wu of Zhou overthrow the Shang Dynasty.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Today Maiwang Pavilion continues to bear remnants from the Ming Dynasty. This three-entry wooden building in Zhao Alley, southwest of Changshu, was listed in the sixth batch of national key cultural relics protection units in 2006.

Another noteworthy book collection relic is the Tieqintongjian (iron guqin, a seven-stringed plucked instrument, and copper sword) Building, in the town of Guli, which has survived 200 years intact.

The owner, the Qu family, collected books and spared little expense in doing so. They also read books, proofread ancient volumes and edited bibliographies allowing knowledge of history and many other things, as well as wisdom, to flourish and to be propagated.

When the Qing army was besieged during the Taiping Rebellion in Changshu in 1862 and searches were conducted house to house, the Qus put their lives at risk to safeguard the books. After New China was founded in 1949 the family, respecting their ancestors' legacy, donated all of their collections to the nation.


Maiwang Pavilion is a three-entry wooden building in Zhao Alley, southwest of Changshu, and was listed in the sixth batch of national key cultural relics protection units in 2006.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Dai Yi says he often overlooks the rapid changes taking place in his hometown. One of the main reasons for the economic growth of Changshu is its rich cultural fabric, the popularity of education and the improvement of civilization, he says.

Changshu's recent library rediscovery event encourages public readers to pay attention to libraries and book distribution points around the city where bibliophiles can borrow books.

Yuyue Study Room in Huancheng East Road is an urban public reading space that locals have nicknamed the "library next door". Sun Yangqing, a reader, says: "I was once sitting inside, with dense trees outside the large glass floor. In the study room, rows and rows of books sat safely between sofas, and with soft music wafting through the air you could only feel blessed to be part of this priceless serenity."


The Yushan Gate on the Yushan Mountain.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chen of Jiangsu World Overseas Chinese Entrepreneurs Association says: "Innovation and inheritance are not mutually exclusive, which means respecting inheritance does not mean you have to be conservative. Changshu people are well versed in the principle of opening up their minds with the rules of the ancients."

In recent years Changshu has increased investment in public services, and the focus on education has become clear. Thirty-three students from the United World Colleges Changshu have been admitted to Ivy League universities in the past three years, and Kang Chiao International School, Suzhou Education Investment Group, Suzhou Foreign Language School, the First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou University and other world-class establishments now have a presence in the city.


Shanghu Lake in Changshu is said to have been named after Jiang Shang, a Chinese noble who helped king Wu of Zhou overthrow the Shang Dynasty.[Photo provided to China Daily]

"We have turned Changshu into a hub that is integrated into the Yangtze River Delta," says the city's Party Secretary, Zhou Qindi.

"Revering culture is the foundation of our city. The skills and talent of Changshu and its people are its greatest wealth, and they represent its future."


For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainsby Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting.[Photo provided to China Daily]


For centuries Chinese academics and historians have regarded the painting Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainsby Huang Gongwang (1269-1354) of the mountains in Zhejiang province as a master specimen of traditional landscape painting.[Photo provided to China Daily]


Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountainson rosewood by artisans on both sides of the Taiwan Straits.[Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-18 12:16:25
<![CDATA[TV program attracts youngsters with traditional Chinese culture]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/17/content_1474318.htm

The CCTV youth channel invites children to celebrate the Chinese New Year with fun games. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival, has long been treasured as one of the grandest celebrations in Chinese culture. The year of 2020 marks the Year of the Rat, and this year, the CCTV youth channel has launched its seven-episode special program Let's Celebrate the Spring Festival from Saturday.

With a spotlight on traditional culture, it invites children to learn and experience through interesting games, sitcoms, contests and classes.

Zhang Jiaxuan, a 9-year-old living in Hong Kong, is among the first group of young guests on the show who come from Hong Kong and Macao. His interest in Chinese calligraphy blossomed in an early age, inspired by his parents. So the calligraphy game on set turned out to be his favorite.


Children learn Chinese martial arts during the show. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Huang Jiayu, a 12-year-old girl from Macao, also developed a passion for calligraphy. "It requires a lot of patience. You need to be very dedicated to succeed."

Li Linfei, a 6-year-old from Beijing, shared his experience in his first program recording. "As the 'conductor' of the train, my job is to lead the team through the Wild Animal World, and give out the assignments," he said. As he was looking for oracle bone inscriptions, he learned quite a lot about this ancient cultural form.

Imbuing liveliness into education, the seven episodes cover a mixture of fields, varying from Chinese idioms, cuisine and martial arts to the animal zodiac and temple fairs.


Contestants play a game about Chinese idioms. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

For instance, in the Chinese idiom solitaire contest, four children form a team using ink bushes to write down Chinese idioms according to the rules.

As a tradition of the Let's Celebrate the Spring Festival program, every year the Animation Week will be launched with two new productions for young viewers, and will also feature timeless choices such as Big-head Son and Small-head Dad and Cotton Candy and Mother Cloud.


Participants put on costumes and learn about the characters from the classic novel Journey to the West. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"We'd like to portray a Chinese style of animation," said Xu Beibei, chief director of the show. "Ink painting, paper-cutting and shadow puppetry will all be incorporated into the animations. The goal is to reveal the fun and charm of Chinese New Year."

In response to the latest media demands, the program will leap beyond traditional TV episodes, producing audio content, short videos and celebrity vlogs. Audiences have expressed great enthusiasm and curiosity about the show since last December. Many posted merry family photos for the production team ?memories of pasting Spring Festival couplets on the door, making dumplings and having family reunion dinners.


Hosts introduce the best wishes of the Spring Festival couplets to children. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Children learn Chinese martial arts during the show. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-17 16:59:13
<![CDATA[China-Brunei Tourism Year opens in Bandar Seri Begawan]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/19/content_1474287.htm

Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The opening ceremony of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 was held in the Brunei capital of Bandar Seri Begawan on Friday, attended by high-level officials from China and Brunei.

Throughout the year, the two countries will host a wide array of activities, such as exhibitions, forums and world cultural heritage presentations to further enhance cultural and tourism cooperation.

At the opening, Zhang Xu, Chinese vice-minister of Culture and Tourism, said both sides expect a new chapter in tourism cooperation and beyond via the year-long event, and to further promote people-to-people exchanges.


Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Statistics show that China is one of Brunei's largest tourist sources. Brunei received over 65,600 Chinese tourists in 2018, up more than 20 percent compared to 2017.

Haji Ali, Brunei's minister of Primary Resources and Tourism, said he believes that the scale of tourism and cultural exchanges between the two nations will further expand with the diversified events across the year.

The opening was highlighted by performances organized by China Arts and Entertainment Group. It featured artists from both countries performing classical folk tunes and dances.

The China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 is sponsored by the Chinese Ministry of Culture and Tourism, Brunei's Ministry of Primary Resources and Tourism, and the Chinese embassy in Brunei.


Dancers perform at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Attendees and performers take a group photo at the opening of the China-Brunei Year of Tourism 2020 in Bandar Seri Begawan, Jan 17, 2020. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-19 14:16:31
<![CDATA[China, Italy welcome cultural and tourism feast in 2020]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/17/content_1474270.htm

As part of the major events celebrating the 50th anniversary of the establishment of China-Italy diplomatic ties, the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism will open with a concert at the Auditorium Parco della Musica in Rome on Jan 21, said Chinese and Italian officials in Beijing on Wednesday.

The year-long event will feature nearly 100 cultural and tourism activities in both countries, ranging from performing arts and visual arts to cultural heritage, tourism and creative design.

The grand opening will consist of a star-studded concert bringing together famous Chinese and Italian artists, a China-Italy tourism forum that will convene industry leaders from both China and Italy, and a photo exhibition showcasing world heritages from both countries.

"China and Italy are two representative ancient civilizations in the East and West. We both have 55 UNESCO world heritage sites, tied for first place in the world," Zheng Hao, deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, said at the press conference on Wednesday.  

"Looking back on the past years, all the important cultural cooperation achievements were groundbreaking, such as the long-term exhibitions set up in each other's national museums, the establishment of the China-Italy Cultural Cooperation Mechanism, and the pairing of World Heritage sites from the two sides," he noted.

Zheng Hao (third from left), deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and Luca Ferrari (third from right), Italian ambassador to China, attend the press conference in Beijing, Jan 15, 2019. [Photo by Fu Rui/chinadaily.com.cn]

The two nations are promoting the twinning of UNESCO world heritage sites to promote cultural tourism. The West Lake Cultural Landscape in East China's Hangzhou, for example, has established a friendship relation with Italy's City of Verona. The two heritage sites are exploring exchanges and cooperation through co-producing films and exhibition curations.

Chinese artworks will not only be displayed at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition in Venice in the upcoming months, but also in famous Italian museums such as the National Archaeological Museum of Naples, according to Zheng.

In the cultural heritage sector, big Chinese museums such as the Palace Museum and the National Museum are working on swap exhibitions with their Italian counterparts.

Zheng Hao,deputy head of the Bureau of International Exchange and Cooperation of China's Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and Luca Ferrari, Italian ambassador to Beijing, attend the press conference in Beijing, Jan 15, 2019. [Photo by Fu Rui/chinadaily.com.cn]

Talking about Italian art that will be shown in China, Italian ambassador Luca Ferrari told China Daily, "We have some very important Italian museums like Uffizi. It will bring large exhibitions to China." 

Italy has become a popular tourism destination among Chinese tourists in recent years. Statistics show Italy received over 3 million Chinese visitors last year and that number is expected to rise to 4 million in 2020. The ambassador noted Italy appeals to Chinese people in three main areas: art and culture, local people's hospitality and its culinary delights.

"But nowadays, there is also an enormous number of Italian tourists who come to China for its countryside, for its beautiful landscape and cultural heritage," he said.

During the press conference, the event's logo was also unveiled.

Logo of the 2020 China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-17 15:32:50
<![CDATA[More than 300 pottery figurines from Ming Dynasty on display in Shaanxi]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/17/content_1474251.htm

More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]


More than 300 pottery figurines unearthed from tombs dating back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) are on display at the Shaanxi History Museum in the city of Xi'an, Northwest China's Shaanxi province, January 15, 2020. [Photo/China News Service]

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2020-01-17 14:24:44
<![CDATA[Cultural event held in Belarus to celebrate upcoming Chinese New Year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/17/content_1474249.htm

A student displays his paper-cutting artwork, in Minsk, capital of Belarus, on Jan 16, 2020. A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]


A four-day cultural event kicked off on Thursday in Minsk, capital of Belarus, to celebrate the upcoming Chinese Spring Festival, which falls on Jan 25 this year. Actors from a dance theater in East China's Jiangxi province will stage four performances during the event to help locals enjoy the annual holiday and its festive atmosphere. [Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-17 11:55:36
<![CDATA[China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism 2020 set to kick off]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/16/content_1473925.htm

The year 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic ties between China and Italy. To further consolidate Sino-Italian relations and deepen mutual understanding, the China-Italy Year of Culture and Tourism 2020 is scheduled to kick off in January. It will cover a wide range of high-level cultural and tourism events between the two countries.

Both China and Italy have a long history and a rich cultural heritage. More people-to-people exchanges between the two countries have been seen in recent years. Statistics show that Italy received over 3 million Chinese visitors last year and the number is expected to rise in 2020.

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2020-01-16 15:29:13
<![CDATA[Japanese jazz maestro Makoto Ozone to perform in Beijing]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/14/content_1473536.htm

Makoto Ozone [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

As part of the 20th "Meeting in Beijing" International Arts Festival, Japanese jazz pianist Makoto Ozone will stage a jazz concert at the National Center for the Performing Arts on Sunday.

The setlist will include both Western classical melodies and Ozone's own compositions such as Bouncing in my new shoes, Asian Dream and Three Wishes.

Majoring in jazz composition and arrangement, Ozone graduated from Berklee College of Music in 1983. The same year, he gave a solo recital at Carnegie Hall in New York City, becoming the first Japanese musician to be exclusively signed to CBS, with the worldwide release of his first album Ozone.

In 2003, he won a Grammy nomination, and has constantly been in the forefront of the international jazz scene, recording and touring with the greats of Chick Corea, Paquito D'Rivera, Branford Marsalis and others. In 2004, he formed the "No Name Horses" band in Japan and has been performing in France, Austria, the US, the UK, Singapore and Japan ever since.


[Photo provided to chinaculture.org]

In recent years, Ozone has also been focusing on works from the classical music repertoire, playing concertos by Mozart, Bernstein and Prokofiev, with major orchestras both in Japan and abroad.

Ozone has won several awards, including the 2018 Shiju-HouShyou award (The Medal of Honor with Purple Ribbon) - Japan's highest award to individuals who have made significant contributions to the nation's academic or cultural life.

If you go:
7:30 pm, Jan 19. Concert Hall, No 2,West Chang'an Avenue, Xicheng district, Beijing. 北京市西城区西长安街2? 国家大剧?
Tickets: 80-480 yuan ($10-70)

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2020-01-14 15:05:57
<![CDATA[Revitalizing village through art]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/14/content_1473516.htm

Media and fashion mogul Hung Huang will direct and narrate Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary focusing on life and people in the Xiayuan village, 50 km to the north of Beijing, where she has lived for more than 20 years. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Having lived in Xiayuan, a centuries-old village some 50 km to the north of Beijing, for more than two decades, Hung Huang, an influential media and fashion figure, admits she never thought of herself being part of it.

Until she decided to shoot Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary about her neighbors and fellow villagers whom she has had a newfound interest in.

"One day, I suddenly realized that Xiayuan is not an average village you see everywhere in northern China," Hung said at a news briefing on Jan 9 in Beijing. "It is my duty to share with the outsiders the charm and beauty of my village."

Hung also believes Xiayuan might serve as one of the models for villages nationwide. China has about 700,000 villages but many are facing almost the same problem which indicates an uncertain future -- aged villagers dying while young villagers fleeing. "To revitalize Chinese villages through art is a trend that has become ever stronger in China in recent years,?said Hung. "That brings new hope to the village, a fountainhead of culture and civilization.?/p>


Wang Wei, founder of A-Lab, a Beijing-based media company, teams up with Hung to start shooting Come Along with Xiayuan, a 90-episode documentary, to be released on social media platforms as video blogs. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The first artists?village emerged in China in 1990 when artists Ding Fang, Tian Bin, Fang Lijun and Yi Ling came together and lived in rented houses in the Fuyuanmen village near the Old Summer Palace. Now there are reportedly about 3000 artist’s villages or art zones of various sizes and types in China.

Situated in the Xingshou township of Changping district, the Xiayuan village boasts a history dating back to the Tang Dynasty (618-907) and is known as a tourist hotspot for its culture and landscape. Since late 1990s, it has attracted over 300 artists and artisans from across the country who opened their studios and settled down, renting houses from local farmers.

"When artists met villagers and learned to live together, their interaction and collaboration have since spawned a new kind of local culture, which is vital for the sustainable development a village," said Wang Wei, founder of A-Lab, a Beijing-based media company, who has teamed up with Hung to start a 90-episode documentary which will be released on social media platforms as video blogs.


Some resident-artists from the Xiayuan village attend a news briefing for Come Along with Xiayuan, a documentary which delves into the inside stories of the well-known artists village in suburban Beijing, on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

With Wang acting as the producer and Hung as the director and narrator, the documentary project will run through May when an arts festival kicks off in Xiayuan, better known as the Xiayuan Artists Village for Tourists.

"Besides my work in the media and fashion industries, I will pay visits to fellow villagers and resident-artists and dig out their interesting stories," Hung said.

The documentary project has got warm support from the villagers and the resident-artists. Some even delivered improvised music at the news briefing while some others sent warm welcome.

"Living in Xiayuan gives one inner peace," said Zhao Gang, one of the resident-artists who attended the news briefing. "Come and become a villager at least for one day and I am sure you will fall in love with our village."

Xiayuan has been welcoming visitors since 2003. Many artists open their studios every day from 2-4:30 pm since May 2003. Tourists may spend their time enjoying art, music, food and culture and talking with local farmers and artists, said Lao La, a resident-artist who creates oil paintings and operates a popular restaurant.

 

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2020-01-14 10:55:28
<![CDATA[Give rats a chance to accompany you through 2020]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/13/content_1473514.htm

By Molady [Photo/tmall.com]

Steal, bite and destroy, rats don't have a good reputation in most countries.

In 1958, the grey creatures were listed as one of the "Four Harms" in China.

However, they are more beloved in two-dimension world, as they are the first of 12 Chinese zodiac animals, and almost everyone knows Disney's Mickey Mouse and Jerry from the Tom and Jerry series.

In 2020, the Year of the Rat will fall on Jan 25, the start of another 12-year cycle.

To celebrate the Lunar New Year and bring yourself good luck, a piece of auspicious accessory is a must-have.

Gold and silver ones are good choice for cold seasons to light up your whole ensemble.


By The Beast. [Photo/thebeastshop.com]


By Chow Tai Fook. [Photo/ctfmall.com]


By Chow Tai Fook. [Photo/ctfmall.com]


By Swarovski.[Photo/tmall.com]

You can also choose cuter ones to give yourself a different look.


Mouse and cheese shaped earrings, by Say Hi. [Photo/tmall.com]


By Swarovski.[Photo/tmall.com]


By Mymiss. [Photo/tmall.com]


If you are tea lover, a rat-shaped tea pet is a good purchase.

Mouse shaped tea pets, by Heniyouyuan.[Photo/tmall.com]


Mouse shaped tea pet, by Zidian. [Photo/tmall.com]


Mouse shaped tea pet, by Cishen. [Photo/tmall.com]


Porcelain mice. [Photo/tmall.com]


Tom and Jerry candle, by The Beast. [Photo/thebeastshop.com]

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2020-01-13 15:27:07
<![CDATA['Three-Body' trilogy inspired exhibition debuts in Shanghai]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/13/content_1473512.htm

Liu Cixin, the award-winning author of the trilogy, attended the global debut. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy, China's best-selling science-fiction novels, made its global debut in Shanghai on Friday.

Hugo Award winner Liu Cixin, the trilogy's author, described the exhibition as "rendering to the audience the true feeling of being surrounded in the restored scenarios in the books."

The organizer said that the exhibition is dedicated to restoring classic scenes and science fiction stories in books with frontier technological approaches after one year's preparation, gathering the efforts of 27 curators and artists from around the world.


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"We strived to present the fabulous experience that the magic and magnificence of the trilogy rendered to its readers in a spiritual world with three-dimensional senses combining visual, audio and video interactions," said Shi Fei, board chairman of Shanghai Zun'an Tongheng Cultural and Creative Development Co Ltd, the exhibition organizer.

The exhibition covers nearly 2,000 square meters spanning three floors in Shanghai Tower, the world's second tallest building and China's tallest, in the Lujiazui Finance Area. It replicated six iconic scenarios in the trilogy, of which the first book, The Three-Body Problem, won the Hugo Award in 2015.

Liu said he was impressed by the scenarios, including water drips, the three-body planets, the severe winter and the chaotic era, in the exhibition, saying they were very close to what he had in his mind when writing the novel.


The exhibition features the scenario of water drips in the trilogy. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I was also impressed by the curators' creative and interactive ways to present the words in the books. As a writer who works with words, I felt for the first time that words are becoming alive, empowered by high technologies," he said.

The exhibition will be open until February 2021 and many other Chinese cities, such as Beijing, Shenzhen, Taiyuan, Xi'an, Wuhan, Shenyang and Ningbo, have expressed strong interest in hosting the exhibition, Shi said.  Japan's Tokyo and Osaka also are interested.

The trilogy has been published in at least 25 foreign languages and has sold over 20 million copies. Celebrity fans of the books included former US president Barack Obama and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


An immersive exhibition inspired by The Three-Body trilogy  made its global debut in Shanghai. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-13 15:00:22
<![CDATA[Exhibition of donated art to celebrate Chinese New Year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/13/content_1473510.htm

A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

Of the 110,000 artworks in the collection of the National Art Museum of China, nearly 30 percent were donated by artists, their families and private collectors with the hope of benefiting more and more members of the public.

To mark their generous contributions to enriching the national art collection, the National Art Museum will open a special exhibition, A Tribute to Donors, on Jan 19. The show will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations it has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019.

The exhibition through March 28 is meant to offer visitors a visual treat during Chinese New Year celebrations.

Works on show will include classic Chinese ink paintings and calligraphy, oil works, lithographs, sculptures and photographs.

The exhibition will offer a glimpse of the brilliance of ancient Chinese art, trace the evolution of Chinese art in the 20th century and review the cultural exchanges between China and the world.


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]


A Tribute to Donors will present a selection of more than 850 works from the donations National Art Museum of China has received, from as early as 1961 and throughout 2019. [Photo by Jiang Dong/China Daily]

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2020-01-13 11:28:00
<![CDATA[Beijing exhibition reviews artist's sensitivity and diligence]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/09/content_1473506.htm

Autumn Moon In The Sky, 260x170x80cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]

Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006 with a display of his signature installations and sculptures of momentum, as well as sketches, photos and videos to show the cultural roots of his works, tracing back to his hometown in South China's Fujian province.

The exhibition, held at Beijing Minsheng Art Museum, shows Chen's sensitivity to the dramatic social changes over the past four decades, during which he evolved from a village boy and art student to one of the leading figures of China's contemporary art community.

His works, which often depict surrealist scenes, reflect individual experiences and also a collective feeling of social developments while addressing emerging issues such as overconsumption.

The exhibition also celebrates Chen's productivity at work, trying on various mediums and styles and bringing his imposing art to not only art museums but also public spaces.


Ark of Transcendence, 512×400× 420 cm, stainless steel, 2012 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Inheritance, 236x118x80cm, stainless steel, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Walking Man, 390x150x260cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Sitting Meditation, 192x120x82cm, mixed materials, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Another Wonderland, 386x250x330cm, 2017 [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Chen Wenling and two dancers pose before one of Chen's works. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Fable of Duration, a contemporary art exhibition through Feb 28 in Beijing, examines Chen Wenling's creations since 2006. [Photo provided to China Daily]


Noted sculptor Sui Jianguo at the exhibition opening. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-09 15:48:27
<![CDATA[Chinese spinoff drama on royal affairs debuts on Netflix]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/09/content_1473504.htm

Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31.

In the summer of 2018, Story of Yanxi Palace garnered more than 18 billion "clicks" to top all online Chinese dramas that year.

Its producer and scriptwriter Yu Zheng tells China Daily the latest spinoff has subtitles in 23 foreign languages, including English, Thai and Hindi, and is the first such Chinese series to be streamed on a foreign platform before being released in China.

The new tale takes place around 15 years after the end of the first one, which unfolds through 70 episodes to chronicle the rise of Wei Yingluo, a low-born royal maid who overcomes palace intrigue to be crowned the "imperial noble consort" to Emperor Qianlong (1711-99) of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911).


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

As the hostess of Forbidden City, China's imperial palace, and the most powerful woman in the king's harem, Wei ?a role reprised by actress Wu Jinyan ?is seen encountering a new crisis in the latest series: Her princess daughter is urged by a Mongolian prince to cancel their engagement, as he believes the rumor that the young woman is spoiled and willful.

To clear her reputation and win back her love, the princess sneaks out of the palace to embark on an adventure, discovering that the situation is more complicated than she had estimated.


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

"I have had the Princess Adventures story in my mind for a long time. It's sort of a tale that is more relatable for modern youngsters. The title's protagonist is an adorable and straightforward woman. When she falls for someone, she takes action without hesitation," says Yu, 41.

The statistics from the television market company CSM Media Research show that Chinese TV series ran an average of 42 episodes per production in 2018.

Considering that dramas on Netflix are much shorter, Princess Adventures recounts "a comparatively simple story" to be told in just six episodes, Yu adds.

"Most domestic production companies are still exploring how to better sell Chinese stories abroad. I hope this drama demonstrates the beauty of Chinese culture to foreign audiences," Yu says.


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]


Yanxi Palace: Princess Adventures, a six-episode spinoff of a 2018 runaway hit, is being shown on Netflix since Dec 31. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-09 14:49:56
<![CDATA[Contemporary art show looks for 'a stitch in time']]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/13/content_1473240.htm

The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Today's Documents, a major exhibition of international contemporary art held every three years by Beijing's Today Art Museum, has committed to presenting the experimental advances of Chinese art and also the evolution of global works.

Co-curated by Huang Du and Jonathan Harris, the fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently.

The exhibition, first held in 2007, teams up 37 artists from across the world whose works on show are grounded on topics such as the global imbalance of economic development, refugee crisis, terrorism, cyber attacks and environmental deterioration which are threatening human society.

The exhibition will run until March 15.


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]


The fourth Today's Documents exhibition is themed on "a stitch in time" to address the complications of global social, political, economic and cultural changes recently. [Photo provided to China Daily]

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2020-01-13 09:48:09
<![CDATA[Dance drama featuring Silk Road love story makes US debut]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1473238.htm

Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

A Chinese dance drama featuring a sad yet beautiful love story on the ancient Silk Road made its US debut in Lincoln Center on Thursday.

Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.

The young couple, artist Mogao and his beloved Yueya, could not stay together because of the objection from Yueya's father, the Great General of Dunhuang. During a violent confrontation between the couple and the general, Yueya sacrificed her own life to save Mogao, and her body then transformed into an eternal spring running through the desert.

With great grief, Mogao carried on with his artistic journey and finished a marvelous mural on the wall of Mogao Caves, a treasure house of Buddhist art which is listed as a UNESCO world heritage site now.


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

Apart from the story itself and the dancers' excellent skills, the stage setting and costumes have made the drama more eye-catching and convincing, as Dunhuang is bestowed with a unique landscape and social convention at a crossroads of trade, culture and religion.

"If some American people feel like traveling to Dunhuang after seeing our show, it would mean we have done a good job in cultural exchanges," said Chen Weiya, chief director of the drama.

The Tales of the Silk Road was created in 2000 by the renowned Lanzhou Song & Dance Theatre from northwestern China's Gansu province, where Dunhuang is located.

During the past 19 years, it has toured around China and more than 10 countries with a total of over 1,300 performances.

Produced by the China Arts and Entertainment Group (CAEG), the drama will be performed in Lincoln Center on Jan 9-12.


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]


Set in the northwestern Chinese city of Dunhuang, an oasis located at the edge of the Takla Makan Desert, Tales of the Silk Road tells an ancient story that resembles the ageless western classic Romeo and Juliet.[Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-10 16:27:41
<![CDATA[Colorful lanterns displayed in Jiangsu]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1473236.htm

Tourists view colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 8, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns in Nantong, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Aerial photo taken on Jan 8, 2020 shows colorful lanterns in Nantong, East China's Jiangsu province. [Photo/Xinhua]


Tourists view colorful lanterns at the Baota Park in Nanjing, East China's Jiangsu province, Jan 8, 2020. [Photo/Xinhua]

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2020-01-10 15:57:15
<![CDATA[<EM>Three Phantoms</EM> musical debuts in China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1473234.htm

The musical Three Phantoms, which features Broadway musical stars Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

The musical Three Phantoms, which features three top actors from Broadway ?Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb ?who have played the phantom in the The Phantom of the Opera, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9.

The concert, in which the three stars perform a series of popular and classical songs from the repertoires of The Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables and Beauty and the Beast, will run on a nightly basis in the Shanghai theatre through Jan 12.

First introduced in 2009, the concert has been watched by more than 120,000 audiences around the world.

The musical Three Phantoms, which features Broadway musical stars Earl Carpenter, John Owen-Jones and Jeremy Secomb, made its China debut at the FANCL Arts Center in Shanghai on Jan 9. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

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2020-01-10 12:52:48
<![CDATA[Photographer reveals wintry world of white in NE China]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1473232.htm

An "Armed" Man, at the Huifa River, Jilin province, January 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]

Heilongjiang River Valley in Northeast China is the most bitterly cold region in China, with long and frigid winters. The rivers and lakes start to freeze in November each year and begin to melt in April the next year. Though the lakes and rivers lose their vitality during this time, people get the chance to become closer to them.

Meanwhile, a more harsh reality is that the economy and population here keep declining, resulting in cities which appear silent and lonely.

This series of photos taken by Zhao Zhi, who now lives and works as a teacher at a college in Harbin city of Heilongjiang province, conveys the photographer's nostalgia. Zhao started creating the photo series in December 2015.


Central Island, at the Songhuajiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Wedding on Snowfield, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Kite Festival at Snowfield, at Lianhuan Lake, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


People enjoy snow and ice at the Songhuajiang River, Huachuan county, Heilongjiang province, February 2016. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Pouring Water Froze into Ice Instantly, at the Heilongjiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Ice Climbing, at Linjiang city, Jilin province, January 2019. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Winter Swimming, at the Nenjiang River, Heilongjiang province, February 2018. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Dog Pulling the Sled, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2019. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Herder and Cattle, at the Muleng River, Heilongjiang province, February 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Fisherman, at the Songhuajiang River, Harbin city, Heilongjiang province, December 2015. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]


Snow Town, at the Songhuajiang River, Jilin province, January 2017. [Photo by Zhao Zhi/cpanet.org.cn]

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2020-01-10 10:43:38
<![CDATA[Actors perform at celebration of Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1473230.htm

Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]


Actors perform at the celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year in Athens, Greece, on Jan 8, 2020. Greeks and Chinese flocked on Wednesday to the Technopolis city of Athens to celebrate together the forthcoming Chinese Lunar New Year which falls on Jan 25 this year.[Photo/Xinhua]

 

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2020-01-10 10:35:42
<![CDATA[Shanghai Ballet to bring its Swan Lake on tour in US]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/09/content_1473228.htm

Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19.

The 108-piece touring team left Shanghai for its US tour on Jan 10. After New York, the company will head to Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky to present four shows of an original Chinese ballet production, The Butterfly Lovers.

In New York, the orchestra of the New York City Ballet will play live music accompaniment for the performance of Swan Lake.

Choreographed by Derek Deane, Shanghai Ballet's Swan Lake features 48 swans compared to the usual 16 or 28. Since its premiere in 2015, the ballet has been shown dozens of times in Europe.


Shanghai Ballet will make its debut at the Lincoln Center in New York with four performances of Swan Lake from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]

Presenting a repertoire of classical ballet and an original production of a Chinese tale, Shanghai Ballet hopes to "present the strong capabilities and artistic style of our company to the sophisticated audiences in the US," according to Xin lili, director of Shanghai Ballet.

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2020-01-09 18:21:40
<![CDATA[2020 Happy Chinese New Year]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/10/content_1472741.htm ]]> 2020-01-10 15:38:02 <![CDATA[Olympic theme highlighted at 2020 'Meet in Beijing' arts festival]]> http://www.k6ed0adm.top/2020-01/09/content_1472554.htm

Chinese and Japanese musicians perform under the baton of Japanese conductor Michiyoshi Inoue in Beijing on Jan 6, 2019. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

With the chorus of Ode to Joy echoing in the concert hall of the National Center for the Performing Arts, the opening concert of the 2020 Meet in Beijing Arts Festival reached its climax on Monday night, kicking off a month-long extravaganza of music, plays, art and cultural activities in the capital.

Through Feb 4, theatergoers and art lovers in Beijing will be exposed to more than 60 performances and three theme exhibitions presented by more than 700 artists from 12 countries and regions. From music and art exhibitions to plays, dance shows and gourmet festivals, the 20th edition of the annual "Meet in Beijing" event will have classical and contemporary cultural elements, as well as Olympic-themed activities, on offer.

The opening concert was jointly staged by the Beijing Symphony Orchestra and Tokyo Opera Singers. Under the baton of Japanese conductor Michiyoshi Inoue, Chinese tenor Shi Yijie, Chinese mezzo-soprano Zhu Huiling, Japanese baritone Takaoki Onishi and Japanese soprano Eri Takahashi joined together to perform the choral finale. Ludwig van Beethoven's Symphony No 9 was one of the masterworks played at the concert to celebrate Beethoven's 250th birthday.


All-female musical theater troupe Takarazuka Revue's The Light of Sword and Love - The Women Who Loved Napoleon will be staged at the Beijing Tianqiao Performing Arts Center from Jan 10 to 12. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Japan, host of the 2020 Summer Olympics, is the featured country for this year's Meet in Beijing. A wide array of Japanese shows as well as food festivals will be held across the Chinese capital, including shamisen musician Hiromitsu Agatsuma's crossover concert on Jan 18, jazz pianist Makoto Ozone's jazz concert on Jan 19 and all-female musical theater troupe Takarazuka Revue's The Light of Sword and Love - The Women Who Loved Napoleon from Jan 10 to 12.

In addition to Japanese arts, other foreign highlights include French pianist Richard Clayderman's New Year concert on Jan 18, Spanish dancer and choreographer Maria Pages' An Ode to Time from Jan 1 to 3 and Joyful Siberia by Russia's State Academic Dance Company of Siberia from Jan 6 to 8.


The Nutcracker will be staged at the National Center for the Performing Arts from Jan 17 to 19. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Among the Chinese shows that will also grace stages during the festival are The Nutcracker by the National Ballet of China, contemporary dance So Low by Hong Kong dance troupe Lai Tak-wai and the drama Blessed Family by artists from Beijing People's Art Theater.


[Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]

Elements of the 2020 Winter Olympics are a major draw for this year's festival, which will feature snow and ice activities and lantern shows in Beijing and Zhangjiakou.

The 2020 Meet in Beijing arts festival is sponsored by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, State Administration of Radio and Television, the Beijing municipal government, and the Beijing Organizing Committee for the 2022 Winter Olympics. It's organized by the China Arts and Entertainment Group and the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Culture and Tourism.


Joyful Siberia by Russia's State Academic Dance Company of Siberia was staged at the National Center for the Performing Arts from Jan 6 to 8. [Photo provided to Chinaculture.org]